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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, first post. My daughter has a 2004 New Beetle Turbo and it has developed an oil leak from the EVAP system. There is oil on a small black box that is located right next to and slightly behind the coolant resavour that appears to have oil coming from it and there is a rather large pool of oil on the garage floor just ahead of the right rear wheel.
The black box looks like the four lines that attach to the tp have been blown out. Most of the connector are broken and the connectors are protruding above the box and can't be pushed back in.
It started last week when she got a TC that said that it was running lean at idle. The code was cleared and didn't come back right away. She then called me a few days later saying that her oil light came on while she was leaving her place. I asked her to drop it off at my place because it was time for an oil change and I could them take a look at the TC it was throwing. When I got home I could see that there was a lot of oil running from the underside along the drivers side. Some from the engine compartment from that black box, but the greatest quantity seems to be coming from right in front of the right rear wheel. Upon pulling the dip stick there was oil only showing on the very tip. We had checked it about two weeks before and it was in the middle of the range.

So my question is what is causing this and what do I need to fix/replace to stop the oil leak?

Coincidentally I noticed that the buss bar on top of the battery looked warped and when I pulled the cover it was very burned inside. Most of the damage was centered around the fuse that supplies the cooling fans. the fuse appears relatively unscathed, the buss bar however is totaled and will need to be replaced. Funny how a 50 dollar part will sacrifice its self to save a .17 cent fuse. It was the OEM 30 amp fuse by the way.
 

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Oil leaks; can be tough to find, there are a number of dye based kits, that help you pinpoint where the leak is coming from. The conventional way; would be to take the car to a pressure wash bay and thoroughly degrease everything and then check for leaks, afterwards. Hopefully, this would make things easier and be a more objective way, to find the leak. If you used a dye based testing system; it would be even easier.

Dye based leak detection kits (should be available at most auto parts stores):

https://www.google.com/search?q=oil...es_sm=119&ie=UTF-8#q=engine+oil+leak+test+kit

I do know; having replaced the turbo feed/return line on a 1.8T, that hose goes in the area you are referring to. It is possible; that line could be leaking or it could be another common issue; the cam seals (similar area I think), they seem to leak allot when they fail. The turbo feed hoses; typically leak, right where the metal/rubber "crimp" is and the hose next to the crimp, deteriorates over time (usually cracks/leaks).

If you have some pictures; post them up and you might consider, degreasing the engine around the area where the oil is, then things should be easier to see. If you are willing to try a dye based kit; that would probably makes things very easy, I have never tried one but they look like a great way to find leaks!

Post up some pics and keep us informed; as your troubleshooting and repair process progresses! Lets get this thing fixed! :)
 

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billymade has offered some good suggestions, however, be careful about using high water pressure, you do not want introduce water into the oiling system.

The black box behind the expansion tank is primarily fuel related so the oil is not likely coming from there.

The oil light is probably coming on due to the resulting low oil pressure condition and/or the loss of pressure resulting from the leak, I caution you on driving the car until the problem is found and repaired.

For the oil to reach that high, it is probably not a cam seal, the timing cover would almost certainly prevent this.

As billymade has mentioned, it is likely a damaged turbo oil line or even a leaking turbo charger case, with that much leakage it should be reasonably easy to find the culprit.

This is engine damage waiting to happen.

Incidentally, the oil level should always be maintained at the full line on the dip stick, wait at least ten minutes after the car has been turned off before checking it so that the oil at the top of the engine can drain into the pan for a more accurate reading.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks

Thanks for the replies. I will have to do some more checking tomorrow.

It seems that something else is at play here. When I checked the coolant res, it was full of milk shake.

My best guess for the cause of this is a leaking head gasket. Is there anything else that can cause the mixing of coolant and oil, like a water oil cooler?
 

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Remember the turbo has coolant and oil running through it, it's possibly the turbo is internally damaged allowing coolant and oil to mix.

You may have a broken line as well hence the external oil leak.
 

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If the turbo charger is damaged inside and coolant and oil find a way to meet in there then that would mean they have access to each others pathways, coolant from the engine and radiator circulate and often return back to the expansion tank, this is one way oil might get into the expansion tank.

You might want to drain your radiator into a container so that you can see the extent of the contamination.

 
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