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The genuine Volkswagen fuel pump was made by VDO; as is the case with many of these, the fuel tank level sending unit, was separate and so I had to transfer the old one to the new fuel pump.

After reassembly, I checked the fuel pressure and it was in spec; the long turnover issue disappeared and the car seems to be running well. After that I replace the fuel line and replaced the unique fuel filter; that has the integrated internal fuel pressure regulator. I have come to the conclusion that Volkswagen did this when they went to the return-less type of fuel system; as they deleted the fuel pressure regulator from the fuel rail.
 

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After that, I checked the spark plugs and it turns out they installed, some really dirt cheap Motorcraft, standard old school copper spark plugs in the engine and they had the wrong gap or the out of spec gap, was caused by electrode wear? I went ahead and got the correct NGK double platinum oem plugs, bought at a great price off of Amazon and installed those with the correct gap spec. As you can see there is a trend here; whoever owned the car before, use the cheapest or incorrect parts available and this really caused a lot of performance problems, in the long run. I always, wonder why people do this; for some reason, people do these types of things to Volkswagens, from what I find and the cars, are terribly neglected, show signs of poor repair attempts.
 

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Another issue that we had ran across was the car was not shifting correctly; the owner stated that it had some hard shifts, when it was cold , first thing in the morning and so I was concerned of about whether or not the transmission was bad or the throttle body was defective with the typical solenoid sticking issue. I ran a scan with VCDS by Ross Tech and found the tiptronic gear selector assembly; was "short a ground". We went ahead and pulled the console and found that the gear shift selector assembly magnets were missing and somebody had went ahead and removed them. The owner purchased another similar 2003 new beetle convertible as a parts car and so it had a good used part intact; we installed the good used tiptronic selector assembly; cleaned the contacts/circuit board with CRC electronic contact cleaner, lubricated it, the black plastic moving parts were smooth and after resetting the kick down settings with the VCDS, the car now (thankfully) shifts normally and the issue with shifting is finally, resolved! After that I ordered a Blauparts transmission service kit and i went ahead, replaced the filter and fluid.

There are many, more things to do with this car but currently that's where I am at. Today I hope to get it back on the road, try to finish off the other small odds and ends that need to be addressed. The repair bill keeps getting higher: the owner put a limit of $2000 total (parts/labor), so we probably need to stop soon and there are so many other issues that still need to be handled; including a right side CV axle with a splint boot on the inner tripod joint.

To say that this car was neglected is an understatement; the back window, has the typical issues with shrinkage, of the top material pulling away from it and the resulting the gaps of the convertible top. However, since we live in the desert; it doesn't rain often, so it probably can be something that can be put on the back burner, until the owner decides to replace it.

Overall, I am pretty happy with the work we have done so far; the primary major concern, was the 09G six speed auto transmission shifting problems and that was able to be fixed with the replacement of the tiptronic selector assembly swap. In my view this made the car viable at that point and worth keeping; if it had a bad transmission it probably wasn't worth fixing and would be a parts car or just sent to the junkyard. I am sure by the time he fixes everything it will be much more than what the car is worth but he seems to have decided to keep it and use it as a commuter car. The goal at this point, is to make it a safe and reliable daily driver; that he could take on a trip and be secure in it with the idea of being able to go wherever he wants to and theoretically not break down or left stranded somewhere! :) We still have a lot of work to do and parts that need replaced. However, I think it will be pretty reliable, after we have gone through it and (hopefully) a good commuter car for him to drive.

So that was a short culmination of "what's next"; for this project 2005 new beetle convertible with a 2.0 L with the six speed tiptronic transmission! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Very interesting - you've become a VW detective. It's hard to believe what people will do to "fix " things, when the correct parts are available.
Thanks for the photos. Here, I hope to get my engine back together again today and do a test run - hope all goes well.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
I would really appreciate your advice regarding my situation with the '98 engine here. As I've told you I did the timing belt job, water pump, fuel injectors, fuel filter , fuel pump regulator, plugs, wires, and also a new coil. I used as many top name brand items as I could.

So, after topping off the coolant ( knowing I'd have to add more several times ) I unplugged the coil and turned over the engine a few times. I did that so I could make double sure I didn't hear any noises that sounded like valves banging into pistons !!! I also thought it would get fuel pumped all the way up to where needed. All seemed normal. So, I plugged in the coil, got my fire extinguisher at the ready, and decided to try start #1. She fired right off, and seemed as normal as could be - except for a really rough idle. It didn't have that before.

Soon, the check engine light came on. As I went to plug in my OBD II scanner, it was then I found that a past mechanic had broken off one of the two mount tabs holding the socket into the dash ! My push with my scanner plug naturally broke off the 2nd mount tab ! I used several, old Air Force words I save for just such occasions. It's a separate flight line language that old B 52 Crew Chiefs know well !!!!!! So, I had to take time to repair that item before I could plug in the scanner

Once plugged in, and on the VW page , it displayed the code P1035 , and said NOX sensor : range/ performance problems.
Do you have any ideas that might help me ? If I rev the engine it seems smooth, but at idle it is very rough.
Thanks for any help.
 

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Hey, always look up your trouble codes; on the Ross Tech Wiki, as it has code definitions and offers advice, that is VW specific, which can really help you narrow down the related problem.


It looks like you could look at "live data"; to see, if the sensor is working, they reference using a VW factory type scan tool, like the Ross Tech VCDS and/or, they recommend, the replacement of the defective part? Looking online, it seems a "NOX sensor", maybe AKA: a 02 sensor, possibly Bank 1 Sensor 1 which is the 02 sensor, before the catalytic converter or Bank 1 Sensor 2, after the catalyst. You could see, if there is any activity; from it with a scan tool and looking at live data; might help determine which sensor, is possibly at fault?

02 sensor locations:



Here are pages; going over testing procedures, using a generic scan tool and a multimeter (keep advancing; to the "next page", as there are many following pages, going over the testing steps):


17443/P1035 - Sensor for Nox (G295): Signal Implausible

I haven't seen this trouble code before or the "NOX Sensor" G295 mentioned; on these earlier cars or know, where the G295 could be and the sensor location diagrams, do not show this sensor either.

Let us know, which scan tool you are using; sometimes, we have seen, some scan tools give erroneous info or generic info, that may or may not be accurate or misleading. This seems to be particularly the case with some of the cheaper Chinese knockoff scan tools and their software definitions info, can be misleading or incorrect. This is just speculation on my part; if anyone, has seen the G295 before or if I am giviing the wrong info here, PLEASE give us correct info! :)

I hope, this gets you going with your diagnostics; give us some info, on your scan tool, its live data capbility and the results of your testing, we can go from there! Thanks! :)
 

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PS: after some digging in the free online service manuals; I found a reference, to the "G295" in a exploded view for a Mark IV Golf, which is essentially the same car, as our New Beetle's:

NOTE: #8 in the digram: NOx sender G295:

8 - NOx sender -G295-


This seems to be showing a "direct injection engine"; which I can only assume, is a Diesel/TDI engine and not your 2.0L gasoline engine. So, there seems to be some odd info or the scan tool software; is giving us, wrong or erroneous code definitions?


Regardless, viewing live data and testing; may reveal, which sensors, possibly 02 sensors are malfunctioning or defective? Lastly, I have heard, the early first 1998 VW New Beetle models; were a odd bird, as they were a transitional model from the Mark III and Mark IV platforms, having some odd parts, that were not on the later models, so it maybe possible, they have a Nox G295 and the 2000 on models didn't? Again, all speculation on my parts; hopefully, your digging, testing and visual inspections, reveal the cause of your trouble codes and issues. Thanks! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #28
I am most grateful for your assistance, and I can tell you that your knowledge of these VW's is way over my head ! But I'll keep up as best I can, so please excuse me if I have to ask for something a couple times !
OK - My scanner is not a high $$$ one, but is a new model that can get updates via a computer link. It's a OBDSpace , model OS5100, OBD II / EOBD made by Obdspace Technology Co, Ltd. , and yes it is a China product.

Your last sentence above made me start thinking that I had done many things to the motor, and while doing so, my large hands in that space space bumped many things, as well as I had disconnected many items. So, this morning I started by doing a visual inspection , and hand "wiggle" of every part I touched or bumped. WELL - I concluded that the secondary air pump would probably work a lot better if it was plugged in !!! Yup, I had overlooked connection that item. Pushing on, I didn't see anything else that I had goofed on .

I started the car, and the terrible rough idle is no more, but there is still a rough idle that was not there before. Connecting the scanner again now produces a code P3035
Throttle Control Module 2 ( J544 ) Mechanical Malfunction.

I an now going to the Ross Tech Wiki as per your suggestion - Thanks for your help - again.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
PROBLEMS SOLVED !!!😊 After checking the function of the mechanical part of the throttle control module, I sure couldn't notice anything wrong. I also checked all the wiring harnesses, etc. All seemed to be in order. So since our snow had melted, and it was the warmest day we'd had in quite awhile, I decided to take the Beetle out for a drive.

We live on a small farm, so I have a long driveway to get to the hiway, and as I was stepping on the brake pedal, it sure seemed to be a "hard" pedal to me . What ? Power brakes and a hard pedal has to = vacuum hose off the booster. I went for the ride anyway, and was thinking that if the hose was off the booster, that could also = my rough running at idle.

Back in the shop, and a quick inspection showed that the preformed plastic hose to the booster had cracked, and was off the fitting ! I cleaned the hose end, wrapped it with some rubber self stick tape. Then I used a large piece of black electrical shrink tube and heated it to snug it all nice and tight. The hose pushed back on the fitting just like a new hose would. I took the car out again, and I have power brakes at 100 % , plus the engine idles just as it should - it's a happy engine now !
 

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Took your advice, and the hose is now on order ! Thanks so much. This car has always been outside since new, and a hard plastic hose is bound to be subject to cracking .
I'm pleased that now I can push on with other parts, and stop being concerned about the engine and it's rough running problem ! Going to do all new hoses next, a new thermostat, new brake hoses, and new new brake hard lines on the rear axle. It should be pretty much done at that point. Thanks again for the help.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
On a different issue , I'd like to once again tap your vast VW Beetle knowledge, if you don't mind. This time I'm talking about the brake master cylinder fluid reservoir, and in particular the place that VW chose for it's location. On all the car & trucks I've worked on over the years, there seems to be one item that the factory places somewhere that is darn near impossible to access. I always joke that they hung one item in mid air, and built the rest of the vehicle around it !! For this '98 Beetle, I'm thinking that master cylinder fluid reservoir must have been that item.

After I change all the brake hoses and brake lines that I plan to, I will be doing a complete fluid flush job, and getting to that fluid container is going to be a bugger.
So my question for you today is this ; Do you know of any company that has developed a remote fill reservoir kit for this vehicle ? It sure would be nice to have the brake reservoir located in a place that I could easily get to and pour in brake fluid without making a mess.

Thanks for your thoughts and tips ! Cheers,
 

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Something like this? These work great to do a flush.


You can also remove the tray under the wipers that will allow a lot more room to access the rear of the engine from the top. However to just top up some brake fluid a funnel with a long neck would be preferable.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
This Bleeder would probably be great for my total flush job, after I replace all the parts I plan to do. Thanks for the info and suggestion.
I am still holding out hope that someone has a kit for adding a 2nd reservoir in a more convenient location. Years ago, when the master cylinder was located under the floorboards, we'd drill & tap a hole in the side of the cylinder wall, then run a line up to a safe spot in the engine bay, and connect it to a reservoir that we bought at a swap meet, or from Ebay. Now, even Summitt and Jegs sell kits for this purpose. However I see that our VW's have wiring connected to the filler cap, so my guess is that it's a float of some sort. Like a low fluid warning type deal.

Great idea about removing the tray under the wipers - - guess you've been there before a couple times. Thanks again
 
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