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I have two 2004 New Beetles. One is a parts car with a 2.0 engine and a four speed auto.tranny. It was a rollover total wreck, but the engine and transmission are good. The other is a convertible. It has a 1.8 turbo and a six speed tranny which won't shift past third gear. I am trying to decide on a course of action.
1)Should I replace the valve body/solenoids in the six speed and see if that fixes the tranny?
2)Can I swap the four speed tranny into the turbo 1.8 convertible? I have the computer and tranny controler box from the 2.0 donor car. Can this be done?
3) Should I swap the 2.0 engine and tranny together into the convertible with the 1.8? There might be axle shaft, exhaust, etc. compatibility issues in replacing the turbo 1.8 with the 2.0.
 

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As a long time 1.8T owner; I would always, go with a 1.8T powered car and comparing the 01M 4 speed to the 09G six speed, the six speed is believed to be more robust. The 1.8T convertible sounds like, it has a good high end spec from the factory and would be a more enjoyable car to drive, compared to a 2.0L with a 01M 4 speed. Swaps can be done but at this point; you can buy these cars for really cheap, I don't see the benefit of the swap and in this case, you would actually be "upgrading down" in my opinion. If you were wanting to create a "monster beetle" with all kinds of performance parts and possibly a VR6, all wheel drive, aka: RSI clone, I would understand but swapping in anemic parts, from a base level new beetle donesn't make sense to me. This is just my opinion but I always would choose, the best performing engine and running gear, sold in the particular year new beetle, your is spec'd out nicely, you are willing to live with the issues inherent in the convertible top and if you want to spend the time, money, to get it back in good shape, that would be the one to work with.

Now, when it comes to the 09G transmission; you should do some troubleshooting first, before thowing parts at the tranmission (even though the valve body is a common failure point). It would be a good first step; to scan the car with a vw scan tool, like VCDS by Ross Tech and see, what trouble codes, related to the transmisson, are pulled from the transmission. We have seen, the tiptonic selector failure, sensors not working right, wiring harness, and then, the typical sticking solinoids in the valve body being a issue. Lastly, internal issues; can cause problems as well but we have had good luck with many members, fixing the above noted problems and gotten their transmissions to shift normally, once again. As always, there are no guarentees but we see, these issues all the time and you have a high probablility, based upon what we can seen around here, that you maybe able to fix things without requireing a full rebuild or dropping the tranmission.

So, I would start troubleshooting the transmission; in a methodical manner, start with a vw scan tool, post any codes you find and we can go from there. Thanks.
 
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