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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a Turbo Bug now and I bought it with the knowledge that I would have to put some work into it. I will ask about it in a few treads but lets start with the one problem that is bugging me at the moment !

How does one take out the rear muffler ? From the looks of things it will not come out unless you drop that rear suspension cross bar some how AM I CORRECT?!!:confused:

I have it separated from the Cat but had to stop obviously. Anyone have trick to doing this?
 

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Do not need to remove the exhaust to deal with water in the exhaust.

And how did water get into the exhaust?

I have seen condensation build up in mufflers and freeze over the years, but even in this situaiton we never removed the exhaust.
 

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Also scratching my noggin...How does a large amount of water make it into the muffler? Yeah a little from condensation is expected.....

At any rate. Most mufflers have a weep hole or a small drilled hole that is the drain. If you have water sloshing around? Might be better off just drilling a small drain hole. You're talking about doing some major damage to it with a sawzall. If the muffler is still in good shape? I'd just drill a hole or two for drainage.

S-
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Well he's the story...
I bought this car with the understanding that it overheated ! So like the mechanic that I am I figured it was a head gasket. The guy I bought it from was tired of trowing money into it. He just dropped a used engine in it and a trany a few months prior to that.
I took it home and found that the bottom hose came off because that retainer ring was not installed properly ( happened on my wifes BMW also after a trip to the dealer)
I reinstalled the hose correctly and proceeded to add water into the bottle to find out if there are any other leaks ! sure enough I find a leak in the back coming from the EXHAUST MANIFOLD ? :eek:.
I kept hearing water dripping into something so I continued the diag and found that when I put water into the bottle it goes into the engine filling the cylinders up and then it goes down the exhaust pipe into the cat..resonator..and lastly muffler :cuss:
SO anyone else experience that one ?
Did I mention that I don't think that this 1.8T engine belongs to a Beetle (it has a cam electric tensioner, but I don't have a plug for it)
 

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I can't speak to much of the turbo engines, as I'm still learning about our 2.0.

Does this style of turbo use a cooler? I know it should have oil supplied to the bearing to keep it from blowing apart--but we had a mazda engine with a turbo and it used a tube setup from the cooling system to the turbo charger. Now if that section of a turbo became damaged or had a bad seal or the like?

Just saying.... This is not my area by any stretch...Just guessing..

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Water in the exhaust is the least of your problems, it will blow out/evaporate if you ever get the engine running. I woul not worry about removing the exhaust due to water in it.

So the question is the problem with the turbo and the water coolant or is the water leaking into a cylinder(s) due to a blown head gasket or a damaged head because of a jumped timing belt?

Also there were a LOT of different engine configurations for the VW Beetle and other models. I think some had variable cam timing and you need the correct wiring if the engine has variable cam timing.

As cheap as these cars are/should be, not sure I would have purchased someone else's project.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Projects I'm not afraid of ! I once took a job were the customer had an IS300 where the previous mechanic just left the car after taking the head apart. He handed me a box of bolts and stuff. I had it running in about 8 hours. But that was on an engine that I'm familiar with. Like I said VW's are not my forte.

In regards to my problems, the timing belt is not an issue because that was the first thing I checked before I bought it (since it's really easy) so I'm thinking that the head gasket is bad, but to what extent that is yet to be determined ?!

The engine in my 2000 is an AWP which either is from a 2002 Beetle S or 2002+ Golf/Jetta :confused: so I may have to find the correct engine or get another AWP.
 

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I'll go one step more. Do a cylinder leak down test. Pretty easy to do with an adapter to an air compressor. Pull the valve cover, rotate the engine until both valves are closed (compression stroke) And apply air pressure. Do this with the expansion tank cap/cover off.


If you believe the cylinder is filling with coolant/water? You should have a bubble fest in the expansion tank.

All things are fixable. Just depends on how far you want to take things.

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
A quick starting point to find out if an engine is good, is a compression test. Autozone, or your local parts store will usually loan out the tools you need to do this test.

Sent from AutoGuide.com App
I have a compression tester, but I have water in the cylinders so I think I'll have to suck it out somehow ( maybe a baster and some tubing ?)
 

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If you have a Harbor Freight Tools near by? Pick up a fluid transfer pump for about ten bucks or so. The hose should fit into the spark plug hole.

Actually if you're going to do a compression test? All the plugs have to come out, and the throttle plate gets blocked open for a realistic test.

Pull all the plugs, unplug your coil packs... With all the plugs pulled? Be ready with a towel. Cause it's gonna spew up and out with a couple of cranks. Can't hydrolock an engine with the plugs out. But it'll make a messy.

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Pull plugs just crank engine over and get most of the water out of the cylinders, if needed, then get a blow gun and blow as much water out of the cylinders as you can.

Put a compression tester on and see what happens.

You either have to pull the cylinder head anyway or have an issue with the turbo leaking water and it is getting pulled back into engine.

Was this likely a flood car or do you know that the water/coolant is coming from the cooling system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
No..It's not a flood car because I live in socal. Not to many paces around here get flooded, PLUS we'd need rain for that HuH:p
(Man I wish it would rain)
Anyways..I know that the water is in there because when I put it in the bottle and then I could hear it travel around and eventually go into the exhaust.
I've ordered the tool to remove the head so I'm hoping for a bad head gasket?! I've already have to replace a cracked exhaust manifold.
Since Lexus/Toyota and Honda almost never had a Turbo I have to ask the question..Should I take out the Turbo ( Since water may have gotten in there thru the manifold) and rebuild it once I figure out the other stuff? :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Took off the head finally and found what I was expecting..water in the cylinders and some rust , so at some point I'll have to address that. For now I have to take the head over to be checked , but I know for sure that one of the exhaust valves is sitting lower than the others. I can see that the valve seal has slipped down so that will have to be Looked at.
So How hard is it to remove the valve seals on these heads ? is there a write up here , has anyone tackled it before? I'm kinda leery on messing with that chain tensioner so I'm not going to attempt it since I don't know my way around VW mechanics.
The other option is just to find a used AWP or APH head and just swap them out. :D
 
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