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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
2003 1.8T Timing Belt Broke Head Removal Help

2003 1.8T Engine
Hi all I need help as follows: I had just tuned up the bug for the wife, but had not done the timing belt yet at about 109K. While at home we were going to go drive it to town and when she cranked it up it started then died and it would not start back up. I removed all I could to get into the belt area since I could tell the cam was not turning. After I got in of course I found pieces of rubber from the belt which had spun the teeth apart. I am told this is a zero tolerance engine and the valves are bent for sure. I need a good reference on how to remove and re install the turbo and head so I can have the head repaired as needed. It seems almost better to remove the engine an do the work outside of the car??? Is engine removable from the top or does it have to come out the bottom??? Someone please advise on a good repair manual or CD and any thoughts or pointers.
Gene:(
 

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5/23/10 <3
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Is this a 2.0 or a 1.8T? Or 2.0 with an aftermarket turbo?

And really, just start by pulling the head. Its not a zero tolerance, but it is an interference engine. No need to pull the whole engine unless there is some really serious damage. Its likely just the head, but make sure you check on the pistons too.
 

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My advice is to put a new belt on it first. it would not be the first time I have saved myself the time and trouble of removing the head.

Chances are you have done at least one valve but who knows :)

Suck it and see, could save you a whole heap of trouble.
 

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Putting on a new belt could also cause more damage. I would never recommend not pulling the head. I'd rather spend the time doing that and nothing being damaged, than putting a belt on a damaged engine, causing more problems...
 

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The engine cover probably says "20V Turbo", meaning it's a 1.8t, 20 Valve turbo, not a 2.0 Turbo. ;)
 

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Is this a 2.0 or a 1.8T? Or 2.0 with an aftermarket turbo?
This question is key. If it's a 1.8T (5-valve, factory turbo), pull the head. At least the center intake valve in all 4 holes is toast, guaranteed. The pistons must also be inspected after head removal.

However, if it is a 2.0 with aftermarket turbo, put a belt on it and see what happens.

Putting on a new belt could also cause more damage. I would never recommend not pulling the head. I'd rather spend the time doing that and nothing being damaged, than putting a belt on a damaged engine, causing more problems...
How do you figure that setting up the timing and installing a new belt will cause more damage? That's completely false.

I've been through this dozens of times. With the older ABA engines, you can get lucky more often than not. With AEG/AVH/BEV, it's more rare, but still possible. Installing just a belt is always the first step. If it runs nice after you install the belt, you're done. If it has a new misfire, then do a compression check. I've found that the 2.0's generally just barely kiss valves, only enough to cause a miss (and sometimes only one or two of the 8). The 1.8T's on the other hand, annihilate valves every time and sometimes even take pistons with them.
 

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... However, if it is a 2.0 with aftermarket turbo, put a belt on it and see what happens.



How do you figure that setting up the timing and installing a new belt will cause more damage? That's completely false.

I've been through this dozens of times. With the older ABA engines, you can get lucky more often than not. With AEG/AVH/BEV, it's more rare, but still possible. Installing just a belt is always the first step. If it runs nice after you install the belt, you're done. If it has a new misfire, then do a compression check. I've found that the 2.0's generally just barely kiss valves, only enough to cause a miss (and sometimes only one or two of the 8). The 1.8T's on the other hand, annihilate valves every time and sometimes even take pistons with them.
I would not recommend starting it; you can do the same check by putting a belt on it and hand crank it; if you do not have to put any muscle into it, then you know you have no compression.

If it were me I would pull the head and get it reworked.
 

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I would not recommend starting it; you can do the same check by putting a belt on it and hand crank it; if you do not have to put any muscle into it, then you know you have no compression.

If it were me I would pull the head and get it reworked.
What are you afraid will happen if you start it?

With a 2.0, you've got to start it. In my experiences, even if the valves have hit, you'll still have some compression. I've seen it numerous times. The last AEG I worked on with a broken timing belt only had 1 bad valve out of 8, and with a new belt, it ran only with a slight stumble. A compression check after the belt replacement revealed only a slight loss in cylinder #2.

If the valves have contacted the pistons, they've contacted pistons. Installing a belt and starting it cannot possibly cause more damage. The worst that can happen is it won't start, the best is that it'll purr like a kitten and you won't have to deal with R&R the head. It's one of those everything-to-gain and nothing-to-lose situations.
 

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And not replacing a bent valve means more wear on the valve seat,improper air fuel mix with bad combustion and possibly more engine damage as microcracks in the valve stem propagate until the valve head staps off at speed falling in the combustion cylinder breaking the other valve head off bashing the piston top maybe breaking it and nicking uo the cylinder walls.

Do a cylinder leak down test to find out which valve is bent and repair it correctly.
 

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5/23/10 <3
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Yup. Sometimes there is just a little damage that doesn't show itself on startup. But you can end up causing more problems in the long run. Opening it up and checking the head and valves will ensure that everything is in the shape it should be. I would never have a timing belt failure and not take the head off to check things first.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Smileybug I made a mistake on the post it should have been 1.8T. I do need to pull the head just never done it on one of these new bugs and need a good R&R guide. I found one on myturbodiesel.com but of course for the TDI but cannot seem to find much help with step by step with pictures which help on a gas 1.8T??? You have anything that may help me?
 
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