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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello All,

Looking for some advice.
My daughter has a 2005 Beetle 1.8 turbo gas (140k+ miles) and just recently started to have issues where car is starving for gas. At times it doesn't die just like you popped the clutch feeling. Sputtering.
It starts at times then dies after a while.
No codes have come up when scanned and have changed the fuel filter and fuel pump, yesterday and not resolved. Fuel pump fuse (28) is good.
No engine light or other lights have come up but the usual lights.

I've had a couple friends tell me 1) temperature sensor or 2) condenser. But not sure...

Any thoughts on what it could be?
Let me know if I could provide more information.

Thanks for looking!!
 

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With the 1.8t; it could be a number of things, typically dying and drivability issues,!come diwn to ignition or fuel delivery issues.

Fuel system: have you tested the fuel pressure; before and after replacement? What brand fuel pump; did you buy? We have seen non oem fuel pumps; cause all kinds of problems, even brand new out of the box, they cannot seem to maintain the needed volume inder load. The oem pumps, that work correctly; are Bosch or VDO. Another part of the fuel system; that gets overlooked for replacement; is the fuel pressure regulator, after 140k, i would definitely replace it as part if your fuel system repair.

Here are the fuel pressure testing procedures; including, the fpr:

http://workshop-manuals.com/volkswagen/new_beetle/l4-1.8l_turbo_(bnu)/maintenance/tune-up_and_engine_performance_checks/fuel_pressure/system_information/specifications/

Another part of the fuel system; that has caused starting possibly stalling issues; especially, when the fuel tank is full, is the purge valve.

Crank position sensors; can also intermittantly work and stop sending a signal, when the engine is hot.

Many fuel delievery problems; will not, throw trouble codes and so, testing procedures, are important to find any clues to the problem.

Fuel trims, are another thing to check and this can help observe, the tune of the engine.

http://wiki.ross-tech.com/wiki/index.php/Fuel_Trim_Info

Lastly, a dirty throttle body or the loss if its settings; can cause a hard start, rough idle or stalling. A clean and throttle body alignment procedure; is the fix for that.

There are many other possibilities but you might start with the above checks and testing, see if you find anything and we can go from there. Thanks!
 

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Since it is your daughters car and you probably do not want this problem to linger, I would suggest you replace the fuel pump, fuel filter and fuel pump relay. While you may think this may not be the correct approach, fuel pumps are not lifetime items which can and will cause strange problems as they wear as well as leave the car stranded.

Hopefully the pump or relay are the primary problems, but if not you have ruled these out and have increased the overall reliability of the vehicle. Make sure you get a fuel pump relay from VW and not some questionable 3rd party source. Save the original relay and leave it in the trunk with the spare tire.

Also keep in mind the ignition switches can be problematic in these cars as well.
 

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fuel pump relay

when it's your fuel pump relay you'll get a bunch of DTC codes saying that those devices are shorted to ground. I just recently replaced my fuel pump relay and it fixed the problem.
 

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My wife has the same car. We found hers died at less than 1/4 tank. We expected fuel pump overheating some years ago based on data then. Since then she hasn't gone below a 1/4 tank and has never had a recurrence. Below 1/4 it is repeatable. Anyway, something to think about if it is a similar situation.

Here is the post from 2011:

"This is the exact same symptom that our 2001 GLX had when the fuel pump was going out. The battery light comes on because the engine is not running. You may find that the problem only happens when the fuel tank is low - gasoline is not covering the pump so it heats up and then trips the relay. After it sits for a few minutes and cools down it works. Eventually the time between episodes will shorten until the pump fails completely. Ours never threw any codes. Replacing the pump (which includes the fuel gauge sending unit) is not that difficult - access is under the back seat. Be sure and replace the relay at the same time as the higher current draw of a failing pump can damage it. If you are in the habit of driving with a low fuel level in the tank, it can hasten the fuel pump failure. Some people recommend never letting the tank get below 1/4 full."

To be clear, we didn't replace anything...we just refuel more often and in the 6-7 years since it has not happened again.
 

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Sure, we thought about it. But in the seven years of daily driving since we have not had a recurrence while maintaining gas at a higher level than 1/4 tank. I suspect not a failing pump, but another system design issue. If it is the pump being uncovered and heating up, then don't allow it to become uncovered and heat up...that is our thinking.
 

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fuel pump.

You should replace it yourself it's very simple. There are a few how to videos on the web showing ya step by step how to do it. I replaced mine a few months back and it's been running great, I replaced my fuel pump relay also.
 

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My thinking is that the pump is malfunctioning, regardless of the conditions it is in and it should be replaced. The last thing I would want; is to be stranded somewhere and more so with loved ones driving it. Thermal issues, that I have seen; indicate a worn/weak pump and it is defective. It is only a matter of time; when it will fail, typically in the worst time for you and replacing it, elminates that moment, when you get stranded, requiring a tow, adding extra cost to your needed repairs.

As noted, swapping it out yourself; is not hard and typically, it can improve the running, drivability and gas milage of your car. If you do it, replace the fuel filter and fuel pressure regulator at the same time.

We have seen oem VDO and BOSCH to be the best quality and work as they should, stay away from aftermarket pumps, that are sold at most auto parts stores. The Bosch, tends to be better priced, has a integrated fuel level sending unit and includes a fuel tank rubber seal, to complete the repair. Amazon, tends to have some of the best prices with free shipping.

You can look up the correct part number for your car here:

https://www.boschautoparts.com/en/
 
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