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Hi Every body,
I recently bought a brand new 2019 beetle dune. 2ltr turbo engine. I took it on a 4000 klm trip and was impressed with the performance of this car. It had plenty of passing power and would sit you back in the seat if you really pushed on it. It has the 6 spd DSG transmission. Any way when I got back home I took it in to what I thought was a reputable garage and had the oil changed which seemed to be taking a long time. They finished and I got the car back and noticed very limited performance, it no longer had the zap that it had previous to the oil change. So I went back a week later and asked what they did and complained about it not having any power. They said all they did was an oil change, now I am a little suspicious of what they may have done. They take it back into the garage and I notice one of the mechanics sitting in the drivers seat with some sort of computer, he said he checked the boost pressure and it was 1.8 bar ? I have no idea what it is supposed to be. Any way I get the car back and take it out on the highway, this time it has more power but still not like it was when I first bought the car. This car had lots of zap when you stepped in it even around town. But seems half dead ever since. What is going on ?

Last year I got a 2013 vw beetle as a loaner while VolksWagon was waiting for parts on a Tiguan that I had bought. Again the loaner beetle had all kinds of power and zap around town and on the highway and I believe the engine in that one was a 1.8 ltr with and automatic. So again I wonder what they did to my 2019 beetle. Can some one help ?

I think that they must have dumbed down the boost pressure but I could be wrong ?

Thanks.
 

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5/23/10 <3
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Not sure how he was checking boost pressure without driving the car around. And what that even was supposed to tell you. 1.8 bar is 26psi. But again, that doesn't really tell you anything.

An oil change isn't hard. There is zero reason you should be having issues with power after one. I would be avoiding this shop at all costs. I would get it to another shop, maybe even the dealer. I guess they could have done something and there could be a hose or something that came undone. But otherwise, its hard to say what the problem is without codes or knowing what all was done to the car.
 

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I agree, there was some thing else done while it was in for an oil change. I live in Medicine Hat Alberta, population around 60,000. I did later take it to our VW dealer where I bought the car and the head mechanic checked it out and couldn't find anything wrong ? They haven't got a very good reputation, so was just a waste of time. I have a OBD II code reader, Brand is BlueDriver. When I connect it to the port it takes 15 to 20 minutes to finish reading and then basically tells me nothing, no information about sensors or values. I contacted BlueDriver.com and they tell me it is fully compatible with my 2019 vw. So I have a funny feeling something has been disconnected or a fuse pulled somewhere as I have used this code reader on a previous VW and it didn't take near the time to read the codes and show results. But am at lose to where to start looking as there isn't much on the internet on these cars yet.
Anyways, thanks for your input Smileybug.
 

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Since, the car is under factory warranty; I would say take it back to the vw dealer for service but it sounds like, you already did that. I cannot think, of what a independent shop; could have done, to affect the car so much. If something was "undone"; I would assume, you would get a check engine light or a trouble code. I have heard the blue driver brand OBD II scan tool, is supposed to be better then a generic scan tool but I don't know, if they are as compatible, as say VCDS by Ross Tech, which is specific to Volkswagens, basically a clone of the factory scan tool, they use at the VW dealership. If you decide to keep the car long term and possibly; do your own work on it someday, the $199 investment; will pay off and save you money in the long run (a cheaper option is OBDEleven).

You might discuss things with your local VW dealership; talk to the manager of the service dept. have him or the vw tech that is working on the car, drive the car with you and discuss, specifically the issue you are experiencing, replicate things during the test drive, so he for sure, knows what the problem is, that you are dealing with. I am convinced, many of my under warranty problems; were never resolved, as my dealership wouldn't allow the vw techs to communicate with the customer (me) and never did a test drive with me, to show them the issues I was dealing with. You might also ask, if you can drive; another car, of the same vintage and spec (engine, trans, etc); so, you can compare, how they feel and accelerate. I don't know, the current situation with the latest Beetle models but at one point, there were ecu/transmission software updates and this, seemed to affect how the cars ran, accelerated and even, possibly the gas mileage (a independent shop; typically, would not do this or have access to a scan tool, that would do updates like this).

If you get nowhere, you might contact vw customer care and see, if they can help or seek another opinion, at another local vw dealership but working with your local vw dealership, might be a good thing. Long term, if you don't get things resolved; you may need to seek legal advice on the lemon laws in your area; talk to the regional vw service rep and possibly, go through a buy back or lemon laws, to get out of the vehicle. This maybe getting ahead of things but if there is defintiely a problem and it doesn't get resolved, I would pursue getting it handled NOW; rather then, when it is out of warranty and VW maybe less inclined to help, as the vehicle ages, slips out of the factory warranty. I had a transmission issue that was never resolved; after two years of fighting with things, never getting anywhere; I ended up getting a buyback through VW but I got less money back, as the longer you keep the vehicle, the more miles and depreciation, will accrue on the car. Keep us in the loop and let us know, how things go and if you get things resolved, Thanks! :)
 

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Thanks for your input billymade, I did take it back to the VW dealer that I bought it from but was just a waste of time with these guys, they are not very reputable at all and I should have bought else where. I live in Canada where we don't have any lemon laws here. I spent some time with my bluedriver OBD II code reader and think that there are issues scanning for codes as it took 13 minutes to do the scan and basically didn't show much of anything. I had a 2018 Atlas and it would read the codes and give results within seconds, was also used on a 2019 Honda pilot and there again give results quickly. I did take screen shots of the results on the Beetle and will forward them to BlueDriver.com and see what they have to say. I had taken the Beetle on a trip through the mountain to Vancouver Island and back home here and had all kinds of get up and go. So only leads me to think that the place where I had the oil change done had changed some thing in the ECU which is limiting the performance. I sat and waited for an hour and half for the oil change, the car went in as soon as I arrived and 1.5 hours later it was done which is a little longer then normal for an oil change. The car now has less then 9000 klms on it. I can only think that this garage did some thing for what ever reason. I also check for loose hoses and find nothing there ?
 

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5/23/10 <3
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Can you post the scan results here as well?
 

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X2 please post any trouble codes; that you have gotten with the bluedriver scan tool. I cannot see, why a oil change; would require any scanning or physical changes to the car, aside from removal of the drain plugs, replacement of the oil filter and possibly, the clearing of the oil change service light? The problems you are having may or may not; have anything to do with the oil change and might be a coincidence? Regardless, if in fact; there really is something wrong with the car, you should get it handled and call VW Customer Car and/or find a VW dealership, that can diagnose and repair the issue, to your satisfaction. Of course, you need to figure out/diagnose a problem; to be able to fix it, which in the case of a intermittent problem; can be a challenge, for a technician, if they cannot replicate the issue or do not actually know, what problem you are referring to (thus, the recommendation; of a service manager/vw tech that will do the work, drive with you and you can point out the drivability issue, as you or he/she drive the car aka: "real life" test drive). My dealership, would blow me off; constantly and just tell me on the service order/receipt, "car working according to manufacturers specifications", which ultimately, means nothing. Yeah, I have a pretty worthless VW dealer as well; until you can demonstrate the problem or they can replicate it, you will have a tough time; getting things fixed and dealt with. Persistence, pays off; don't give up and ignore the problem, if you continue to have the issue. I learned allot with my buyback experience with VW; I'm a low key person, do not enjoy confrontations but one has to be firm, escalate the issue to those with authority and if you decide, you need to get out of the vehicle, make that plainly known and move forward with ejecting the car from your life. You may not be at that point but I would move forward; contact VW Customer Care, so the issue is documented with them and get the service manager/vw tech; to drive with you and try to replicate the issue, in their physical presence in the car and that way, they know, for sure the issue. In this age of cell phones; being able to video things, you might video the problem and post it to youtube, then, they can watch it and it will be documented there as well. Be persistent, firm (not rude), document with vw customer car and provide proof of the issue (test drive, video, etc.). Keep us in the loop and lets hope; you get things handled soon! Thanks.
 

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I have used this blue driver before without any issues on a 2018 vw Atlas and also a 2019 Honda Pilot, both of these vehicles give full results but for some strange reason this 2019 vw beetle is not giving much information at all as you can see.
 

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So, i guess one immobilize code? This maybe a case, where the car is so new; the app needs ti be updated, to work better with it? It would be preferable to use a vw specific scan tool; like vcds by ross tech or obdeleven, etc. The better tools, like vcds; allow "logging" of things like turbo boost levels; which is essentially a "recording" of the data pids, which when viewed after a drive, could be used to see if there are any indicators of low boost. True testing needs to be backed up by verifiable data and not just how you "feel" the car is boosting; if you find the boost is low or other problems, this could be brought to the attention of the vw dealership and could help get the car repaired. It maybe a case, where the vw tech could no replicate the same boost issue, you experienced and thus, did not make any changes or repairs to the car. This can be frustrating but with quality vw scan tools with logging capability, you can provide verifiable data to help narrow down the problem. This is way beyond what a normal customer should be required to get a fix handled but this can help, confirm your problem and finally, get things fixed.

Now, aside from scanning the car; how, is the car currently running and has anything changed or problems popped up, from the recent drives you have been on?
 
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