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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I just had a revelation today that made me feel pretty dumb (unfortunately this is more common then I would like to admit!) My 02' Turbo S; has always as far as I can remember... has had a noisy serpentine belt; made, squeals, chirps, had a "wonka, wonka, wonka" sound, tensioner moved quite a bit and eventually, slippage that forced me to replace belts somewhat often. This would fix the problem for awhile; until the squealing and slipping problem would come back. My waterpump failed @ 30K and I was out of warranty; so, I replaced everything in the belt path... but still had the same issue. When it was under warranty; I kept telling the dealer about it and it was never resolved but they kept replacing the belt.

Fast forward to now; I just realized that these alternator pulleys have a clutch in them and all this time, this sucker has been seized; I almost have 70k on the clock! Almost 40k with a siezed pulley, ugh! Its all coming clear why all the noises were there; why the car kept eating belts et al... so! The alternator pulley was one of the few things I didn't replace!

Question: What brand are you guys buying that you are finding perform the best and last the longest? Right now the going rates from the "usual suspects" seems to be in the $50-$70 range. My factory pulley was Valeo; my local parts place has Gates (over $100), german online places are carrying "INA" and online genuine VW parts say about $71 or so.. I have the 120 amp alternator... I'm willing to even spend more on something like the Gates; if in fact its superior to OEM or whatever the latest revision is from the dealer (I don't know who the oem is at this point).

If you guys have any insight into the different brands and what you would recommend; please let me know; thanks, from a long time confused and now truly humbled squealy sounding Beetle owner! :) (I can't wait to get this fixed; I have been stumped for years!)

Lastly, it looks like this pulley can be swapped in the car; any experienced with that? Looks like enough room... :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
UPDATE: looks like after doing some research; the INA looks pretty good; look @ page 24 of their propaganda! Looks like these pulleys have been improved since 2002! :)
(Turns out the Schaeffler group is the parent company of some of Germany's finest automotive parts brands:: LUK, INA, ***, RUVILLE)

http://www.apra-europe.org/dateien/downloads/presentation_INA_OAP_APRA_REMATEC_June_9th_2009_.pdf

From what I am seeing: warranty wise: INA has 12-month or 12,000-mile warranty and Gates has a limited lifetime warranty; maybe another reason for the disparity in price (over $50)!

(con't)
Called all over town; definitely, not a typical part that people have in stock (at least not in my area, aside from the dealer) and finally did some digging with our commercial parts people.I I wanted to get it fast; so other vendors like ecs/mjm were out of the running. I ended up ordering the INA unit from Autozone through my brothers commercial account through the third party IMC: IMC Your Quality Source.... came out to $51.00 plus tax... special order coming out of pennsylvania with express next day shipping (gotta love the benefits of a commercial parts account!). I'm swapping it out tomorrow... will update and discuss the difference! :)

Tried to swap in the car; broke a bit socket in the process; looks I'm gonna have to remove the alternator, put it in a vise or a quick zap with a impact! Looks like this is going into next week to complete!

I ended up using a torx plus bit socket; my alternator is a Velao 120 Amp unit; anyone know if this is the correct bit or size? I also put a torx T50 in the shaft and it looked like it might work but didn't use it, for fear of stripping it out. I guess using a impact would eliminate the need for the bit during removal but still need it to tighten! I feel less worried about using the impact to REMOVE the pulley but don't want to use it... during installation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
UPDATE and repair completion: I got the new pulley; I had to remove the alternator to get the pulley off, local shop had the special tool so they put it on for me. They just used a 3/8" impact with the special splined tool from Hazet. With the impact; just zapped right off; they used a the impact again to install this, kinda made me nervous about damaging the alternator (very expensive) but I had it tested before re-installing it and it tested fine (thank god!). Another note; these alternators have a unique feature; the regulator and brushes can be replaced off the back of the alternator. This can save you some money; if the bearings are still good, at about 70k my bearings sounded fine! Of course this begs the question; if you replace the brushes/regulator are the bearing then going to go out in the alternator body? If you can afford it; maybe buying a new on and not having to go through the replacement process again maybe worth the extra money! As mentioned in other "how to's"; you cannot get the alternator out; through the removal of the headlight assembly. Once that is out;; it comes out easily! My alternator was a Veleo unit and interestingly enough; the new and old clutched pulley were made by the same company INA. I hope this newer one lasts longer! We will see! :)
While I was "in there" I went ahead and cleaned the throttle body and adapted it using VCDS and all went well. At 70k, it needed cleaning and it did make a difference, along with the cleaning of the throttle body temp sensor. The pulley and new belt made a great difference and the whole belt path is much quieter, even the car has better power... because the belt was slipping all the time under load. Overall, the new pulley and clean throttle body/temp sensor, have turned my beetle into a "new" car; super quiet, smooth idle (can't hardly hear, feel the engine idling at a stop light, smooth power and the tires break loose easily! Now, I just need to find the issues with a two codes that have been plaguing me for years:

2 Faults Found:
16711 - Knock Sensor 1 (G61): Signal too Low
P0327 - 35-10 - - - Intermittent
17978 - Engine Start Blocked by Immobilizer
P1570 - 35-10 - - - Intermittent

I have taken the knock sensor out; cleaned the contacts but need to do some wiring, sensor testing. Have been doing research online; seems could be: sensor failure, incorrect torque to the mounting bolt or wiring problems. I have been having immobilizer no start (start, quick stall, key icon in speedo flashing) for years.... I hope to conquer these two tough gremlins and be free of them popping up! The love affair and dysfunctional relationship; with the New Beetle continues.... :)

Special Alternator Pulley Removal Tool info:

[I]For mounting the V belt pulley (slip clutch pulley) at the alternator (manuals call it a generator),
especially for T.D.I. VW Golf III, Vento, Passat and AUDI A 3
17MM outside dia. Length 30mm.
Also for Boxster. (See repair Group 27 (Porsche Bulletins) Boxster Alternators with free wheeling Pulleys. High Quality Tool
Made in Germany.
This 3400 is Hazet number 2592.


Hazet also makes a combo set with the bit and the serrated removal socket:


Alternator Pulley Tools
Item: HAZET 46412

Combination Socket
Set 2 parts consisting of the Adapter with internal serration
and Screwdriver Socket for mounting and dismounting the alternator pulley at the generator.
VW, AUDI, PORSCHE, MERCEDES, FORD, etc.


UPDATE: 2013 tool availability.

As these OAPs are becoming more and more popular; there are many tool options for these now. On the high end; INA, GATES and other OEM, aftermarket suppliers are selling tool sets in nice plastic cases for pretty much any application you might run across. Then, there are Chinese repro sets that pretty much are the same but are cheaper, I can only imagine not as durable but maybe fine for occasional use. For VW specific repairs for the New Beetle and VAG cars, in general; the bit and special socket are probably all you need, as opposed to a whole set. These are available online; in Chinese cheap quality levels (ecs tuning etc.), mid level through metalnerd, other VW parts shops and the high end through Snapon, Mac, Matco and the German tool world through Hazet, Stahlwille, and many others. Hope this helps; google "vw alternator removal tools" for the correct tools! :)
 

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I have a new role, I had to remove the alternator to the disc from, local shop had the special tool so that it is at for me. They used a 3/8 "impact wrench with the special tool from Hazet toothed at the effects;. Only zapped right away, they used a impact again to install this somehow made me nervous about damaging the alternator (very expensive) but I had tested it before installing it again and it (thank God!) tested fine Another note,. these generators have a unique feature, the regulator and brushes can be replaced at the back of the alternator To save some money ,., if the bearings are still good, at about 70k my camp sounded fine, of course, the question arises;! when the brushes / regulator are the camp then go out in the alternator body to replace, if you can afford it;? maybe buying a new on and not going through the replacement process again maybe the extra money go worth as in other "how to's" mentioned, is you can not get the alternator out, by removing the headlight assembly Once out! ,., it comes out easily My alternator was a Veleo unit and interestingly enough, the new and old clutched pulley from the same company INA I have hope that we will see newer longer.! Overall, the new role and clean throttle / temp sensor, my beetle in a "new" car spun, super quiet, smooth idle (not hardly hear the engine feel idling at a traffic light, smooth performance and the tires! Break loose easily Now I just need to find the problems with two codes that have plagued me for
 

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I am current working on some more info on the AOP/OAP, Alternator Overrun Pulley. Once I get some more time I will post this info here in the 1.8l section and cross post in the 2.0l section as well.

A few things.

1. I went with an INA pulley, purchased on Amazon.com for a decent price and quick delivery.

2. I originally purchased a pulley tool from Metalnerd?s VW TDI Engine Tools, Tools for VW Beetles, Jetta, Passat Golfs, Audi what to allow pulley replacement when the alternator was still mounted in the car. I happened to purchase when the proprietor was on vacation and when checking on shipping, realized it would be about 10 days before the tool was to be shipped.

3. I ended up purchasing a tool on Amazon for $15 and received it is 2 days.

4. I tried to replace the pulley while the alternator was still mounted in the car. This went nowhere. I used a 1/2" breaker bar and even a 4 foot pipe on my 17mm wrench. I finally bailed on this as I was convinced something was going to break before the pulley came loose. There was NO way this pulley was coming loose without an impact. I was a bit concerned even with the impact that the alternator rotor would spin and give me difficulties. But I was also hopeful that the alternator rotor mass would work in my favor. Well just 3 short burst of the impact, after each burst let the rotor stop, pulley can loose without issue. Being generally lazy I decided to use the impact to reinstall the pulley. More on that when I post the final info.

5. Luckily I have a number of impact tools, both electric and air powered, so I removed the alternator from the mounting location, however, I did not removed the alternator from the car. I was able to rotate the alternator while still in the cavity below the intake/throttle body and allow access with the impact.

6. I also found that in the short time the alternator pulley was seized, or at least I think the pulley was seized, my serpentine belt and idler pulley that had less than 8k miles on them were not too happy. The belt was starting to crack in a number of places and the idler bearing sounded kind of ratty so I just went ahead an replaced both the belt and the idler pulley again, but the actual tensioner appeared to be in good shape as it only had 8k miles of a sized alternator pulley.

Just so everyone is aware, check the pictures below. If your alternator pulley has a round plastic cover on the front, your car has an AOP. If you car has an AOP, a quick visual inspection to verify it is working correctly is to watch the serpentine belt tensioner for movement with the car idling. With my seized pulley my tensioner would constantly walk back and forth at engine idle, not violently, but methodically. I also noticed that during cold start if the A/C was turned when when the car was stated I had a NASTY belt/tensioner rattle. Much better without A/C on at cold start and not so obvious at other times.

Once I replace the AOP the tensioner was rock steady at idle and no more nose with A/C on at cold start.

The engine appears to idle smoother and in general the car is much happier. I have an automatic transmission, it appears to shift a bit better, however, this may be a placebo effect??

So I hope to have a specific thread in the next few days with more details on what is an AOP and why it is important to New Beetle owners!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Hey, I would say shifting and acceleration; are NOT a placebo effect, because the belt would slip/spin on the locked OAP pulley! I noticed this; immediately, it just shows how much the system really stops working when the pulley seizes! The videos on youtube; definitely, make it clear... how the pulley stops and freewheels, depending on acceleration and deceleration. I'm no engineer but the difference was remarkable, as you have related! Its always a great feeling; to finally fix something that was an anathema to me for so long! Luckily, for you; it sounds like it wasn't terribly long, since yours failed! :cool:

Depending on whether others have the time and access to a scan tool like VCDS; I would also recommend the following when removing the alternator.

1. remove headlight and remove alternator through that "hole". Remove throttle body for more room to work in.

2. check alternator for wear
a. bearings; should be smooth without any binding or too noisy.
b. regulator/carbon brushes; check for length, clean cam and brushes with electrical contact cleaner.
c. if bearings/regulator; one or both are gone, maybe more cost effective to replace the whole alternator, check online and around town for prices. OAP seems to be around $50 is typical plus shipping, tax etc.

3. r/r OAP
a. if you don't have access to a impact wrench; try putting it in a vise, remove with special socket and bit socket with hand tools.
b. take it to a shop for a quick swap for most likely a minimal charge.
c. zip on/off with impact: a 3/8" probably would have a lower torque range; that hopefully wouldn't go past the torque spec when in stalling it. Needless, to say; using a torque wrench would be the correct way to go. Look on youtube for a "how to" for replacement. (torque setting I believe is 65 ft. pounds)

4. clean throttle body
a. clean inner portion of intake with cleaner/rag.
c. after reassembly; adapt throttle body with vcds.

5. clean IAT sensor (Intake Air Temperature Sensor; located on the intake, right after the throttle body); I used a soft tooth brush and a throttle body/maf cleaner (e.g.: CRC 05078 Throttle Body and Air-Intake Cleaner), very gently clean it and it helps make the car run better, idle smoother. This gets more accurate info to the ecm; to adjust things correctly for the engine to run its best! From what I have read online; the IAT sensor is important to the ecm's adjustment of timing and boost, so it is a good idea to clean it! :)

Here is a pretty good DIY; the covers the basics, even though it for a Jetta/Golf:

http://forums.vwvortex.com/showthread.php?2553089

On the Metalnerd tool situation; I've looked at their tools a bunch of times and have never understood about their long ship and fulfillment times! Most of us; need the tool "now" to get the job done. I have never tried or seen their tools; I tend to go with pro brands if I can or cheaper stuff for occasional special use. Got any pics of your tools and the part numbers; what you thought about them? Thanks! :)

I am also; interested in the Gates "upgraded" pulley; I'm wondering if it is actually better or would create a overall smoother and longer lasting serpentine belt path. We should contact Gates for a sample "evaluation unit" to try out in the newbeetle.org testing labs! LOL! :) A video; showing the comparison of the two; would be cool!
 

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I used my 1/2" drive pneumatic impact, however, I also have a Dewalt 18 Volt 1/2" impact and a Dewalt 18 Volt impact hex driver which I could have used a hex bit to 1/2" adapter which I also have.

I just went with the tried and true solution. There was a slight bit of rust under the pulley on the alternator mating surface, nothing heavy, but I took a stainless steel brush and cleaned the rear pulley mating surface on the alternator, then used a small amount of anti-seize compound on the face and thread so if I am ever unlucky enough to have to replace the pulley again, I might be able to get the pulley off with the alternator in place??

As for the Gates device, I saw that, it was more expensive and not knowing how it is build and what happens if the spring breaks, I went with the INA clutch pulley as it is more of a known quantity.

After seeing how ROCK stable my tensioner is now, I do not think the Gates pulley is needed.

I will try to upload a small video of how stable my tensioner is now. It really does not move with the new pulley.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Did you ever take any videos of the "before, after"; aspect of how the tensioner was acting? I would be interested in seeing those; its been awhile and it would be cool to see! :) Also, showing the difference; using your flashlight "strobe" would really make it obvious! :)
 

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Unfortunately I was not able to get a video before I replaced the pulley and even after I replaced the pulley is it hard to really get a decent shot of the tensioner in operation.

All I can tell anyone is to do this simple test.

Start the engine and watch the tensioer for movement, likely you will need a flashlight as it is pretty deep in the side of the engine without a lot of light.

If the tensioner is not rock stable, you likely have a seized AOP.

The best description I can come up with the tensioner movement was that it "walked" back and forth at idle. Nothing violent, just a methodical back and forth that seemed likely it occurred every full revolution of the belt, almost like the belt had a problem in a specific spot.

Again, if the car was started first thing in the morning, with the higher idle you could hear something was not right under the hood. If the A/C was turned on when first started in the morning, as soon as you put the car it reverse to back out of the driveway or a parking spot there was a very bad rattling sound. Unfortunately I was never able to have someone start the engine from cold with the A/C on and have my head under the hood to see exactly what was happening. With a manual transmission car you likely might not have quite as much noise as with an automatic with the RPM drop and continuous load on the ending with backing up??

Anyway, the tensioner is now ROCK stable at idle with the new AOP, no movement at all. No back and forth methodical movement, no vibration, just almost like a mechanical fixed idler pulley. Night and day difference, however, when the tensioner was moving at idle before the AOP was replaced, the amount of tensioner movement was more puzzling than of concern as at idle it did not move rapidly or violently.

Never checked it at higher RPM, just at idle as I many times did not have "help" when I had a few spare minutes. With 2 teenagers, multiple schedules, seems we are always on a schedule to be somewhere and rarely have a few minutes to just chill out. Also since my daughter is the primary driver of this car, I try to do all the shake down runs and identify the next project, she actually is working 2 jobs this summer and has had some 11 hour days so a lot of them time I did not have access to the car.

Yes crazy as it sounds, my 16 year old daughter actually has 3 jobs and one of them sometimes required her to open at 5 am and the other has her close at 10 pm. She even works multiple jobs the same day pushing her hours into the 11-12 window at times.

All her jobs she works with 20-29 year old staff members that she is actually pulling more hours then them and the managers claim my daughter is far more reliable than the 20-29 year old employees!! Go figure?? Hopefully I have done something right to instill a sense of responsibility and pride in her work ethic.

She is off at a pre-college program for 2 weeks so I have been trying to get the car sorted for the road trips to and from as this car gets way better fuel economy than my full size GMC Yukon and is a bit more fun to drive in the hills with the turbo. Also when the weather is good time to drop the top. Will run from 5-8 am with the top down if the weather permits before the sun comes up fully. This is one of the best time of the day for the drop top in the Summer without a lot of other traffic on the road and the sun coming up.

My next trip I will clock in about 800 miles in the car next week. 650 will be the same day with only about 1 1/2 hour break at the halfway point.
 

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jfoj
I admire your devotion to continuously contribute to the forum with great knowledge and lots of your valuable time.
God bless you !
hknippi :violinba:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
jfoj, your daughter sounds like she is making her Dad, PROUD! I hope that you can get her Beetle in great shape; before she takes it! It sounds like you have made some pretty major headway with all the repairs; you have done lately! Here is hoping for a trouble free shake down! Thanks, for all your time contributing to these threads and discussing these NB issues, that we all need to be aware of and fix! :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Good article over at FCP euro:

http://blog.fcpeuro.com/2014/03/16/diagnosing-alternator-failure-repair-vs-replace/

BY ALEX FIEHL •
Diagnosing Alternator Failure: Repair vs. Replace


Sometimes auto repair involves more than just replacing the part that failed. We tend to replace larger assemblies rather than individual parts because it’s usually easier, even if it’s less cost effective and more wasteful.

If you think your alternator might have failed, step back and consider your options, as it may be cheaper to replace your alternator’s overrun pulley, commonly called an OAP (Overrunning Alternator Pulley). Many European manufacturers have been utilizing these pulleys for over 15 years, including VW, Audi, Volvo, and BMW.

What’s an Overrunning Alternator Pulley?Clutched Alternator Pulley

An alternator is often the source of the greatest load on a car’s serpentine belt system. (When the A/C is turned off) It contains a heavy magnet that spins within wound copper wiring to generate electricity, with more rotational inertia than a water pump or an idler pulley. This means that the alternator tends to want to maintain its RPM level, not change it abruptly. Clutched alternator pulleys offer the ability to provide a disconnect between the serpentine system and the alternator, as well as soften the input on the alternator, caused by normal internal combustion vibrations.

An Overrunning Alternator Pulley has two main benefits.

1) It is sprung in the direction of rotation. This means that sudden inputs in speed are smoothed out and don’t stress the serpentine pulley or tensioner as much as if the alternator’s shaft was directly connected to the belt.

2) It can freewheel when the engine suddenly decreases its speed. If you accelerate to 6000rpm then abruptly press the clutch, the engine will spin down to idle faster than the alternator, which can now slowly freewheel down rather than be forced to decelerate rapidly. Think of it like the freewheel hub on a bicycle. You (the engine) can stop pedaling, but the rear wheel will click away as you roll down the street. The belt will only serve a purpose of driving the alternator, not slow it down.

Because of these benefits, belt and tensioner life is increased, and overall serpentine system noise is decreased. The OAP essentially reduces the overall impact of running an alternator on the serpentine system over the life of the belt.

Symptoms of a bad OAP

A bad OAP should be immediately noticeable through sight, sound, or charging faults. A few common indications of failure include:

A serpentine belt or tensioner that appear to be “hopping.” This may indicate seizure of the OAP, eliminating the dampening and freewheel functionality they are designed to provide.
A battery light illuminated on the dash, indicating a possible complete failure of the OAP that doesn’t transmit rotation into the alternator. This would mean the pulley is in freewheel mode, except in the wrong direction.
Terrible, awful, howling noises.
“Missing pulley syndrome.” In some cases, an OAP can completely self-destruct and fall off.
With the belt removed, you can test it by hand quickly and easily. Hold the inner portion of the pulley with your thumb and index finger, and try to rotate the pulley in either direction. It should smoothly resist movement in one direction, but still spin. This is the freewheel direction. It should not spin in the opposite direction. Now, verify the direction the vehicle’s serpentine belt spins. Does it spin in the same direction as the pulley’s “locked” direction? If so, you’re golden.

If the pulley’s freewheel functionality feels extremely gritty, you may want to consider replacing it.

Can I replace the pulley myself?

Replacing the pulley is only one extra step after the removal of your alternator, and sometimes the alternator doesn’t even need to be removed. They require a special alternator pulley tool for removal and installation, but it’s definitely something the home mechanic can tackle in an afternoon. Use only trusted brands such as Genuine BMW or INA, for your alternator decoupler pulley as generic “parts store” versions usually don’t stand the test of time. Most alternators outlast their clutched pulleys – this is a great way to save some money and get more life out of your alternator and serpentine system.


 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well, my 120 AMP/14 Volt, Valeo alternator (part # 038903023s); finally, gave up that ghost @ 92k and 15 years or so. I think that is pretty good! :) I did some research and for a quality oem part; there are brand new Valeo units or the same Valeo part, remanufactured by Bosch. I went with Bosch and it should be here tomorrow; we will see, how the install goes. So, it seems, that your clutch pulley will go out; before, your whole alternator does. I replaced my clutch pulley with a oem INA unit; as far as I know, it is still in good shape. I will inspect it tomorrow; when I pull the alternator and see if it is still working ok.

The new Valeo alternator has a 1 year warranty and the rebuilt Bosch, comes with a 2 year warranty.

Part #'s:

Valeo (new) 439312
Bosch (rebuilt) AL0189X
VW (rebuilt) 038903018QX
 

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I replaced the regulator/brush unit in my Bosch alternator about a year ago 13 years/95k miles just as a PM. Unfortunately the Valeo regulator/brush assemblies are EXPENSIVE and usually not cost effective to replace.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Bosch alternator install went ok, for the most part (I broke the plastic headlight lock; not the first time!); functionally, it was fine but it is in a Bosch alternator, NOT a remanufactured Valeo unit. I noted a number of differences, between the two:

1. the body of the alternator is a totally different design; it has the classic Bosch replaceable regulator on the back. This should be a more cost effective unit; to service in the future and easier to work on, than the Valeo.

2. the plastic back cover; has a different position indentation, for the positive charge cable connector. While I got it to work, it puts the harness in a more stressed position and will make access to the coolant thermostat, more of a challenge (back cover sticks out more than the original Valeo). I can only assume this model, is made to work with a number of different engines and models, thus the harness isn't quite made specifically for it.

As for the clutch pulley, my replacement INA was still in good shape and was functional. The Bosch, has a new INA pulley as well and it was made in Germany. On the box, the sticker said that the alternator is remanufactured in GERMANY! I was surprised to see that and hopefully, that bodes well for the future life of the part! :) This was a nice thing to see, even with Bosch, I am seeing that many of their parts are of Chinese origin and many parts, are not from Germany anymore.

For removal of the alternator; there was not room to get it out, when just removing the throttle body and so, I went through the head light. This works easily and is the best way to go; I have seen other diy's, where they disconnect the fuel rail to remove it that way but I did not want to disturb the fuel injector seals. I can only assume, after 15 years, that seals would be hard and require replacement, if I reused them they probably would leak. So, I went with the headlight access route but not I need to order a new headlight lock (three torx bolts and the metal bracket comes out).

Upon startup, the alternator was charging a 14.1 V and things seemed to be working ok. I used a tester on the battery and it failed; so, I will do more testing on that tomorrow, I may need to replace the battery as well. After driving home, the car start up but turned over a little on the slow side. We will see, I will have Autozone test the charging system again; when I take my alternator core back for credit.

So, I would say, that the Bosch alternators are a ok replacement for the original Valeo's but they are more bulky and can make things tighter in the engine compartment. As noted the harness is kinda jammed with the new angle on the back cover and access to the thermostat is tighter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Well, turns out my battery is bad as well; it had gone totally dead and I recharged it a number of times, to no avail. I ordered a Autozone Duralast Platinum; we will see how it goes. I had the charging system checked and the alternator was putting out 14 plus volts; so, that part of the system, seems to be working fine. :)
 

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Can Someone Tell Me What the Seized AOP Sounds Like Under Load?

I am curious as I have been researching my noise problem on my 03 Turbo S 1.8T 6 Speed Manual and have come to the conclusion that this is my culprit, however, because all the videos I have found only show the car when its sitting at an idle, I am not sure if the AOP would make louder noises under load, ie: When shifting from gear to gear...? Reasonably speaking I would think it would based upon simple physics and the RPMs increasing the pulley rotation...right...? It seems to me that in 3rd, 4th and 5th gears I can no longer hear the noise, but I know that it could simply be because the road noise is drowning it out at those speeds...Can anyone help me shed some light? I was going to go down and pick up this damn "Special" pulley and realized that it could NOT be my problem and that is when the paranoia with regards to my tranny began to creep into my thoughts...PLEASE HELP...Much appreciation for everyone and all they post. If it was not for all of you I would not have conquered my sludge problem, fuel pump issue, and a number of other "VW" common fails. I thank you all!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
Well, we have discussed the problem; pretty thoroughly and noted the noises, situations, when the pully makes noises. What exactly are the noises you are dealing with and when do they happen. When the clutch pulley wears out, it siezes up, makes screeching, squealing noises under acceleration noises and chirping noises at idle. Belt life is severly reduced, the belt gets glazed from the slipping and the belt vibrates much more,and is pretty noisy.

You might pull the belt and check the clutch pulley; to confirm it is siezed. Check out these videos; for the check procedure and replacement process.

If it is bad, i would recommend replacing the clutch pulley, belt and possibly he belt tensioner, if it is worn, eapecially if it is the original one. Many videos shown the pulley being removed on the car; i ended up removing the alternator and taking it to a local import auto shop, having them install the new pulley, as i did not have the special tool kit/sockets to remove it correctly without damaging the alternator. I was under time constraints and didn't want to wait for special ordering of the tools online; this was awhile ago and now, it maybe possible to rent these from auto parts stores, check around, to diy.
 
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