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Everett Street in May
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Ok, ok, sooooooooo, what "brand" are they and where did you two get them???

Thanks.........TechnoTrix'd....:wave3:
 

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It isn't that easy. You really need a friend to help or have a brake bleeder tool. If you have never done it, have someone do it for you and watch what they do. You probably will be the one to pump the brake pedal!!
 

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Everett Street in May
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3,204 Posts
Correct, if you don't have a bleeder tool or "speed bleeder" :D valves in your calipers, a friend is a definate necessity.

Other than that, it really is straight forward. Just make sure you keep filling the reservoir as you go..:wink:

Soooooo, where did you'all get them??

TechnoTrix'd...:wave3:
 

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5,793 Posts
I got mine used from a friend of psalm. :) They're Goodridge. I believe Tire Rack sells this brand. Neuspeed also has a decent set. 'bout $100 I imagine.

Not sure if you can use Golf/Jetta parts on this one or not. If they're 4 line kits I would imagine you could though.

To bleed the brakes 1 person pump pump pumps up the brakes; 5-10 pumps and you should feel the pressure build up some... apply SOME pressure to the pedal and tell the person working the bleeder screw 'open'. They'll open the screw (w/vac line attached to drain into a glass jar) and as soon as the pedal pushers foot hits the floor, they should yell 'close'. Person closes the valve; pedal pusher ... pushes a number of times... builds pressure, tells screw operator 'open'... repeat about 40-20 times.... Start at the rear passenger wheel. Then the rear driver wheel. Then front passenger; and finally front driver. Don't ever let the resevoir run dry or you'll suck in air and have to START ALL OVER. I suggest you scoop out some of the old fluid from the resevoir so you don't have to pump pump pump pump your way through the whole tank. The trick is to not have the screw open w/o pressure on the brakes. So get a full pedal press.. but stop as soon as that thing hits the floor.

Bleeding just takes like a 10mm?14mm? wrench, a short fuel/vacuum line, a container, and a liter of fluid. It's not hard, but can be tedious. I've even bled the brakes w/the wheels still on the car.
 

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98 Posts
Stainless steel brake lines...

I have heard how easy they are to install and all the advice regarding bleeding the brake system starting at the caliper that is the most distance away from the master cylinder fluid reservoir, ect. But, no one has mentioned anything about any improved brake action or pedal feel, ect. Did it make that much difference for the money??? JK
 

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20V GTRS
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1,120 Posts
I noticed that the pedal felt firmer and the braking a little better. IMHO it was worth it. I tend to drive sprited so I need a little bit better braking. But tomorrow I am about to change all that as I am upgrading to the TT 225 fornt brake kit and hopefuly soon to also do either 337 or TT rear brake conversion.
 
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