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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This DIY is for Replacing the LuK Dual Mass Clutch with a Sachs VR6 Upgrade Single-Mass Clutch.

If you are interested in an Estimate a Competent/Skilled Mechanic would charge, read this post; it is an AEG-O2J using the same clutch kit.

If you are unsure if your problem is the Clutch here are two other threads that you might want to take into consideration.
The Clutch Master Cylinder DIY Thread is here ...
The Clutch Slave Cylinder DIY Thread is here ...

DISCLAIMER: The author(s) assume that you (the reader) are reasonably capable with the automotive tools necessary to get the job accomplished, which means that you won’t glue your fingers together or use a cutting torch to get the bad part out and are smart enough to know not to try to blame or post ranting about anyone else if something goes horribly wrong ... AGREED?

These instructions were developed using the following NB...

1) 2000 APH 1.8T Liter, 5 speed, O2J-EBQ Transmission

The O2J Transmission DIY Thread is here ...

As always, just remember to offer a simple thank you and credit to the original author (D2Beetle) when you tell all of your BUG buddies!!

TIME NEEDED: 1 Hour, as it is understood that the transmission has already been removed.

ITEMS NEEDED: An eBahn Bentley DVD or Haynes Manual. Torque Wrench, Depth Guage and possibly a Triple Square Bit Set (6mm thru 12mm).

PROJECT COST: Varies by the brand and type (Single or Dual Mass) of clutch you choose to install. Price range would be $250 to $600.

SPECIAL TOOLS: SPECIAL TOOLS: Volkswagen Special Tools and Equipment Program ... Clutch Centering Mandrel 3190A ($52), Clutch Fly Wheel Lock Adapter VW558 ($22) and Clutch Flywheel Retainer 3067 ($21).

TECHNICAL NOTES: Some Fly Wheels (Drive Plates) may require shims to mount properly which is used to maintain the 19.5mm to 21.2mm depth for the Starter Gear to engage fly wheel properly. Not all Fly Wheels (Drive Plates) require use of the Fly Wheel Lock Adapter.

WARNING: All Mounting bolts and screws are one time use; i.e. they are "Stretch Bolts" ...

Some clutch manufactures may have pre-installation requirements; here are the only requirements from Sachs for the kit that I am installing ...

Hello Mr. D2Beetle,

You can use brake clean to clean off the surfaces or any other cleaner that will not leave a residue (no mineral spirits). Make sure to thoroughly clean off the surfaces and only touch the edges of the clutch disc othwerise this can result in a chattering clutch or even a slipping clutch.

Best Regards,

Kashif Rizvi
National Service Manager
Automotive Technology Group


WARNINGS: The correct depth of the Fly Wheel (Drive Plate) and, the facing and centering of the clutch plate is a necessity; improper depth, placement and/or centering results in another clutch job.

CAUTIONS: Improper bolt tightening of the pressure plate may warp it.

So let’s begin ...
 

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No NB Yellow Trifecta :(
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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Step One: Remove the Transmission; the O2J DIY is here...

Step Two: Remove the Pressure Plate [APHC DIY 001] and Clutch Plate. Insert the Centering Mandrel [APHC DIY 001-13] and set the Fly Wheel Retainer [APHC DIY 001-14] to the pressure plate "loosening position". Loosen the pressure plate bolts using a star pattern (1 thru 12), so it does not warp. The pressure plate and clutch plate will slide off together.

Technical Note: Be prepared, when the centering mandrel comes out of the crank shaft you will feel the weight of the clutch/pressure plate assembly, so do not drop it.

The Pressure Plate (6mm Triple Square) Bolts seen in the pics below are specific to this brand (I do not know the brand) of fly wheel/pressure plate/clutch and yours may be different.
 

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No NB Yellow Trifecta :(
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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Step Three: Remove the [APHC DIY 003] Flywheel. Use the same "star pattern" bolt loosing procedure. Ensure that the Fly Wheel Retainer is still in place and set the Fly Wheel Lock Adapter to the loosen position. Remove all bolts except one [APHC DIY 004]; the last bolt should be finger loose. Using two hands firmly grab (it is heavy) the fly wheel and pull to pop it loose; remove the last bolt and pull the fly wheel off the crank.

Some fly wheels may not slide off easily and will require more force.

:scared: "Danger Will Robinson, Danger..." :scared: If your fly wheel seems to be stuck you will need to use a prying tool to get it to "pop" loose; remember you are prying against the oil pan and you do not want to crack it. I used a large screw driver [APHC DIY 005], gently pull the handle up and away from the motor and the fly wheel will pop loose. I then removed the last bolt and pulled the fly wheel off of the crank.

Technical Notes: Some fly wheels may not need the use of the Fly Wheel Lock Adapter [APHC DIY 004 A]; the one in this DIY does not. This fly wheel has a raised lip (green line) between the gear teeth and the pressure plate post; so there is no way to use the Fly Wheel Lock Adapter. So to prevent the fly wheel from rotating the Fly Wheel Retainer [APHC DIY 004 B] must be used.

The Pressure Plate (12mm Triple Square) Bolts seen in the pics below are specific to this brand (I do not know the brand) of fly wheel/pressure plate/clutch and yours may be different.
 

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No NB Yellow Trifecta :(
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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Step Four: Remove the fly wheel back guard [APHC DIY 006]. The back guard is flimsy so try not to bend it out of shape; simply lift up from behind the retaining stud.

Pic [APHC DIY 007] shows you what the block looks like without the clutch assembly and transmission.

You are Done! :D

Well sort of ...

Normally I simply state that reassembly is the reverse of the removal; it is, but it is not. Clutches are such wonderful things ... :rolleyes:

Step Five: This step is required prior to installing any brand clutch. Reinstall the transmission back guard. Install your flywheel, but do not torque the bolts beyond 30Nm (22 ft lbs). You need to measure (Gap Measurement tool [APHC DIY 007]) the distance from the block machined surface to the inside flywheel surface; this is to ensure that it will line up with the starter gear. The Minimum distance is 19.5mm and the maximum distance is 21.1mm.

Technical Notes: There must be a hole thru the flywheel to make this measurement correctly. The replacement clutch noted in this DIY does not, so I had to improvise. Also there may be some reassembly instructions you need to be aware of which are specific to the replacement clutch that you are installing; so ask the parts store or clutch manufacture of the clutch what they are or you will be performing yet another clutch job. Also take note that the centering mandrel is in place when installing the clutch plate and pressure plate. This is to ensure that the clutch plate stays aligned when bolting down the pressure plate; if it is not you will not be able to get the transmission back on.

Pic [APHC DIY 008] shows you the unorthodox method I used to determine if my flywheel is within the measurement tolerances noted above. I used two Correll bowls placed upside down on the garage floor. I wanted to ensure that both mounting surfaces were at the same point and level.

Pic [APHC DIY 009] shows a close up of the alignments between the two clutches. The old dual mass clutch is on the left and the starter gear engaged the old flywheel on the top edge, as noted by the wear on the flywheel gear; which is what the red line denotes. So from the red line up is where the starter gear engaged the old flywheel. The new flywheel gear is within the tolerances noted above.

It is also recommended that you use Loctite [APHC DIY 010] or similar substance on the flywheel bolts. Also just for no particular reason, you may or may not have noticed that flywheel bolt #2 [APHC DIY 011] is off center; the reason for this is to ensure that the timing marks [APHC DIY 009] on the flywheel are correct. Flywheel bolt torque is 60 Nm or 44 ft lbs. Depending on the type of stretch bolts that came with your clutch, an additional 90 degree (i.e. 1/4 turn) might be required after the flywheel bolts have been torqued to 60 Nm.

Pic [APHC DIY 012] shows you the clutch plate installed; note that one side of the clutch plate is raised (yellow circle) and the other side is not. The flat side goes toward the flywheel and the raised side toward the pressure plate.

Pic [APHC DIY 013] shows you the three pressure plate alignment pins; the alignment pins on this brand of clutch are slightly off center, so the pressure plate can only be installed in one position. Not certain why this is; perhaps for spin balance.

Technical Note: The pressure plate surface (where the clutch plate touches) comes coated with an anti-rust material that must cleaned off prior to installation.

Pic [APHC DIY 014] Shows you the position of flywheel lock adapter for tightening the pressure plate bolts; be sure and use a star pattern tightening sequence so you do not warp the pressure plate. Pressure Plate Bolt Torque is 30nm or 22 ft lbs.

Now reassembly is the reverse of the removal ... :D

Technical Note: Do not forget to lube the transmission spline before putting it back on.
 

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Daughters 1.8l Turbo
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Ya, sorry, kinda feel silly now, the first line you wrote was replacing the dual mass clutch. oh well, Thanks soo much for the thread though it's AWESOME!! now I feel more confident about doing my daughters bug.
 

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clutch diy

GREAT DIY!!!!!!!! I hadn't seen it till today. Great job Mr D2beetle. I hope this diy is still available by the end of this year when I do my clutch I'm gonna need all the help I can get.
 

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clutch diy

I plan on doing my clutch in the near future and after talking to a mechanic friend he specify that most likely I would only need to replace the clutch/pressure plate/throw out bearing and that the flywheel most likely would not need to be replaced what do you think about that? or you did the flywheel becuase it came with the kit or because you wanted to upgrade?
let me know when you get a chance.
 

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Frank replaced a dual mass flywheel( if you look at the 1st picture in the dyi the clutch disc under the pressure plate has no springs in it. The springs for damping the vibrations are in the flywheel. Less vibrations travel through the drive train to the car smoother ride for the passengers at least thats the theory.)

Dual mass flyweels are expensive and if the fail all these pieces of flying shapnel come out through the bell housing. Since these are transaxle cars the bell housing is part of the case, So you need a new (case Mega Bucks)

So most people replace it all with a single mass flywheel set up just a solid flywheel with some springs in the clutch plate. Cheaper and works good.
 

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single mass flywheel

Frank replaced a dual mass flywheel( if you look at the 1st picture in the dyi the clutch disc under the pressure plate has no springs in it. The springs for damping the vibrations are in the flywheel. Less vibrations travel through the drive train to the car smoother ride for the passengers at least thats the theory.)

Dual mass flyweels are expensive and if the fail all these pieces of flying shapnel come out through the bell housing. Since these are transaxle cars the bell housing is part of the case, So you need a new (case Mega Bucks)

So most people replace it all with a single mass flywheel set up just a solid flywheel with some springs in the clutch plate. Cheaper and works good.
oh, okay thanks for the good info. I might want to do that also than. I'm still in the learning curve of the new beetle transmission.
 

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In picture 13 reference the number 3 dowl pin. See the two tangs sticking out from the pressure plate? Anyone know what those are? I had a problem with them hitting the bell housing. I had to bend them in bit to get them to clear. Well, if anyone else does this clutch conversion, I highly recomend bending them in from the get go because you won't find out if they hit till after the transmission is back in the car and bolted up.
 

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No NB Yellow Trifecta :(
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Discussion Starter #17
I plan on doing my clutch in the near future and after talking to a mechanic friend he specify that most likely I would only need to replace the clutch/pressure plate/throw out bearing and that the flywheel most likely would not need to be replaced what do you think about that? or you did the flywheel becuase it came with the kit or because you wanted to upgrade?
let me know when you get a chance.
Frank replaced a dual mass flywheel( if you look at the 1st picture in the dyi the clutch disc under the pressure plate has no springs in it. The springs for damping the vibrations are in the flywheel. Less vibrations travel through the drive train to the car smoother ride for the passengers at least thats the theory.)

Dual mass flyweels are expensive and if the fail all these pieces of flying shapnel come out through the bell housing. Since these are transaxle cars the bell housing is part of the case, So you need a new (case Mega Bucks)

So most people replace it all with a single mass flywheel set up just a solid flywheel with some springs in the clutch plate. Cheaper and works good.
esse10, VDubYah is right, but my reasoning was very simple, seeing how I was going from a Dual Mass to a Single Mass; get a single mass clutch kit with all of the parts and replace it all; sort of like trying to anticipate the unexpected.


In picture 13 reference the number 3 dowl pin. See the two tangs sticking out from the pressure plate? Anyone know what those are? I had a problem with them hitting the bell housing. I had to bend them in bit to get them to clear. Well, if anyone else does this clutch conversion, I highly recomend bending them in from the get go because you won't find out if they hit till after the transmission is back in the car and bolted up.
Those are for the pressure plate internal spring connections; I did not have any issues with them during my installation.
 

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I couldn't see that they had anything connected to the tangs and appeared that just bending them in a bit wouldn't cause a problem.
As far as my clutch condition...my sister was the original owner and drove the car with great care and never abused the clutch. I bought the car from her at 59k miles and now it has 86k. I also drive the care pretty easy. I was very surprised at the poor condition of the clutch components. The throw out bearing was notchy and loose. The clutch plate still had about 25% of life left on it. Both the pressure plate and flywheel had quite a few hotspots on them and obvious uneven wear. The clutch had developed a small amount of juttering when it got warmed up. The clutch rattled when cold but quieted down a little bit when warmed up. As many a clutch replacements I have done, I would rank this on low on the durability scale for the amount of miles on the car. I have read some people saying they have 200k+ on the original clutch but they must be doing 90% highway driving to pull that off.
The 14lb flywheel I used was a wise decision. I haven't noticed any drivability change in the few miles I have driven it. The power gain is noticable. More then anything, I suspect fuel economy will go up. The throttle input to get the car moving seems greatly reduced. I get a solid 28.8 mpg with mixed driving. I will see on this tank of gas if there is any effect.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
If what you did works and is not interfering with anything, then all should be OK. Regarding clutch life, I changed my first one around 130K; however every vehicle that I have owned has been a manual transmission and it has been my experience that the "average" life of a clutch is 7-8 years or 75k to 100k miles.
 
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