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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Notes on Auxiliary Water Pump Bypass (3 Years)

Just a follow on to this. Did this modification after having a pump split in half on 08-22-2012. Wanted to let people know how it's worked out for me. Just to provide some information on the environment we operated it in.

Temperature range: 30 degrees to 105 degrees.
Driving Enviroment: Mixed highway (65-75MPH), and low-speed city driving usually with a lot of standing traffic.
Miles w/Modification: 20k miles.
Precautions taken: Allow 30 second idle period

Issues: In three years we only experienced one failure with it, and that is one of the factory plastic clamps holding the metal coolant line on the right support rail failing. Likely due to a combination of increased stress on already brittle 15 year old plastic. This this ultimately resulted in damage to metal and rubber line

Solution: Replace plastic clamps with metal ones with rubber bushing. When doing this.

Drawbacks noted: None. No oil issues, no coolant bleeding issues, no overheating.

Precautions taken: Operated in manner similar to older turbo cars. Allowed 30 second idle period prior to shutoff to allow for additional cooling. This is done when parking immediately after highway, hilly driving, or anything under boost.





Below, is the original post I put in regard to this. If I get time I'll release a proper write-up. Obviously VW put this part in for a reason, so do this at your own risk. That said we've had no issues beside the retaining clamp failure with the car now being around 120k miles.



Beetle decided it didn't like coolant in it anymore. Ended up doing a bypass of the auxillary water pump as part of it broke off. Should anyone need a part number for a good fitting molded hose here is the information on it.

Part #: 80404
Desc #:1998 Acura Integra Heater Hose
Note: Will need about 1 inch trimmed off each end. I ended up replacing the clamps with worm gear style clamps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Part broke, we needed it fixed soon as possible. It got us home during a particularlly hot summer, in a pinch. Found no issues with it and decided to leave it that way. No reason, just one less part to fail. Could it lessen the potential life of the turbo, perhaps. But adhering to a proper cooldown interval should mitigate the risk. I just want to pass the info along, with some long-term observations. Who knows might be useful to someone down the road.
 

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turbo no no

It's a good Idea and I'm always ready to learn new stuff on how to save $$ but In this case I think your Turbo is gonna fail in the long run. To each his own ,,,good luck man.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It certainly could in the long term. Worst case, we coke the bearings on the turbo and we find a perfect excuse to install a better turbo with required supporting mods.

Best case nothing happens, and perhaps it helps a fellow .org'er get home should they end up in a similar situation. That being in the middle of nowhere with no replacement part available for days.

Either way I'll keep following this up annually, providing what valid data I can.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Just posting an update as it's been over 3 years since we deleted the pump, no further issues to note since it was done. Same driving environment of mixed city/highway driving in higher ambient temperatures, everything is still stock. Adhering to an idle cool-down period prior to shutting down after highway or aggressive driving under boost seems to work well enough.

No signs of abnormal oil consumption/loss from the 16 year old engine/turbo after running it for 20k miles like this.
 

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