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No NB Yellow Trifecta :(
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Well, I finally got around to working on my recently acquired NB; it had a bad timing belt and before I start taking it apart I decided to try and start it. We checked the timing marks and they were dead on and no it did not start; I was not expecting it to start, just thought I would try it. Here is the You Tube Link if you want to see the attempt. FYI it is getting gas; what is the easy way to check for spark on an APH?

The only warning notice that I did get was a low oil warning light and tone; however we did check it before the restart and oil was added. So I'm not certain if the oil pump, pumps when the motor is not running on its own. Something to research. It does need a new oil tube as it is broken.

I'll be posting my progress as I go as I plan to do my own DIY, but if anyone out there has a DIY on APH cylinder head removal I would be interested in reading it.

If I know the the true name and/or the alias/slang name of a particular part I will put them in these instructions as it might aid the search function if someone wants to know where to find a particular part. So if any of Org'ers know any that I do not please let me know.
 

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No NB Yellow Trifecta :(
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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
Well I started the tear down of "Cowboy" today and did not get very far as the phone rang... :confused:

It was my cousin and she was wondering if I wanted to buy their NB? :confused: Apparently it is stuck in Hamilton, Alabama. When ask what was meant by stuck, she said the engine was "froze"; I'm thinking another bad timing belt. Anyway her husband is going to call me back with the particulars and if it is just a bad timing belt I might be getting my fifth NB tonight for $500; that would be so cool... :cool: :D

Anyway I always take pictures of what I am doing for my reference which makes putting it back together somewhat easier and in some cases I have had no parts left over. So this time I chose to create a text/pictorial DIY for those who might be willing, but have an :eek:hnoes: anxiety :scared: about doing it.

Step Zero: [CCH DIY 000] I use two electrical jack/stands and I always remove both front tires and place underneath the doors just behind the jacks for safety. I also remove the three sound panels (sometimes referred to as skid plates) so I have unfetter access to the lower crank pulley and the radiator drain.

Step One: [CCH DIY 001 & 002] Align the cam and crank timing marks so you are set at TDC.

Step Two: [CCH DIY 003 & 004] Unsnap the washer tube/wiring sleeve that is on the right hood hinge and disconnect the heated washer nozzle connector. The plastic sleeve that holds the wires and washer nozzle tube can be snapped back on to the hood hinge afterward. Remove the hood/hinge bolts; you will need assistance to remove the hood.

Step Three: [CCH DIY 005] Remove the secondary air pump. Disconnect hose #7 which goes from the SAP (#6) to the air breather and then remove allen head bolt #3 which holds a separate mounting bracket that the hose routes through. Disconnect hose #8 which goes from the SAP (#5) to the solenoid valve that is on the exhaust manifold (out of view). Once the hoses are out of the way you will be able to get the pump out. Remove allen head bolts 1,2 and 4 then you can take the pump out. It will take some twisting/rotating to get it out so be careful.

Step Four: [CCH DIY 007 & 008] Remove the coolant expansion tank lid and drain the coolant from the radiator, then remove the temp sensor #2 and disconnect one of the oil cooler hoses #1 to drain the coolant from the cylinder head. Reconnect the oil cooler hose, temp sensor and put the cap back on the coolant expansion tank.
 

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No NB Yellow Trifecta :(
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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Well it is a Black 2001 2.0 GLS, Automatic, Leather and they drove it with the oil light on :( and it shut down. :mad: They said they were trying to get to Wal-Mart to get more oil.

It is in Hamilton, Alabama and the wrecker yard that picked it up is going to part it out if my cousin accepts their $500 offer.

Oh by the way you might want to remove the serpentine belt, I forgot to mention it. The serpentine tensioner has a large rectangular block (01-1) protruding from it. You will need a large wrench (02) with a long handle for leverage. Pull the handle toward the front of the car to release the tension; remove the belt and gently let the tensioner return to its original position.
 

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No NB Yellow Trifecta :(
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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
So I'm at the point where the book says to disconnect all the vacuum hoses, water hoses and fuel lines; to prevent contaminants from getting into the water and fuel hoses, I cut the fingers off of latex gloves and use them as caps and clamp them off.

So here is what I got done today...

Step Five: [CCH DIY 009] Remove the air breather to get access to the water flange (aka Heart Valve); disconnect the breather hose #1A and the MAF #2, remove screws #3 and #4, and the air intake cover will come off. Remove screws #5 and #6 and remove the bottom of the air breather; it is not necessary to remove the filter unless you want to.

Step Six: [CCH DIY 011, 012 & 013] Remove the cylinder head water flange (aka Heart Valve). Disconnect the following hoses; #1 (which is SAP hose #5 from CCH DIY 005), coolant hoses #2, #3, #4 and #5. It is not necessary to remove the #6 vacuum hose connection as the metal tube can be disconnected from the head #6A and #6B. Remove the temp sensor #011-10. The water flange is held on by two bolts #8 and #9. Be sure and check the inner seal as they have a tendency to erode away [CCH DIY 012] which is a common problem for all NB's. It is not necessary to disconnect hoses #013-10 and #013-11 at this time.

Step Seven: [CCH DIY 014] Remove the fuel lines.
 

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No NB Yellow Trifecta :(
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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Ok, I did not plan on working on my NB tonight, but my... :stupid: ... got the better of me.

I wanted to take pictures of the odometer display for the mileage thread. Well my NB is on jacks so I have to be careful when getting in and out; which you are not supposed to do anyway. So when I got in I grab the steering wheel and it moved and locked... dang! :banghead:

So I got the key and turned the ignition to release the lock and got two surprises; one of which did not cause any problems, but I did have to disconnect the battery to make it stop. Apparently there is a electric water pump somewhere.

Under the right circumstances the other could have started a fire. :eek:hnoes: The latex finger cap that I used to cap the fuel line popped because the fuel pump starts when you insert the key! Gas went everywhere! :scared:
 

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No NB Yellow Trifecta :(
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5,634 Posts
Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Well I got some work done this past Saturday and as soon as I get the photos annotated I'll be posting my progress.

I'm to the point now where I'm ready to remove the valve cover and gasket... so I thought.
 

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Northeast Auto Service
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SIR tools or tool aid makes a spark tester for the 1.8 that makes it very east to get to the spark plug. dont understand why you are pulling head if timing is correct. the alabama beetle, tell your ousin to get in touch with me. the wrecker co is going to make a killing if they let them part it out. im needing a nb for my little sister.
 

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No NB Yellow Trifecta :(
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5,634 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
SIR tools or tool aid makes a spark tester for the 1.8 that makes it very east to get to the spark plug...
Thanks I'll take a look at the tester.


... dont understand why you are pulling head if timing is correct...
Previous owner let the timing belt go; hopefully only the valves are bent.


... the alabama beetle, tell your ousin to get in touch with me. the wrecker co is going to make a killing if they let them part it out. im needing a nb for my little sister.
Too late, sorry. :(
 

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No NB Yellow Trifecta :(
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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Saturdays instructional pictorial...

Step Eight: [CCH DIY 015] Removing the fuel injector wiring harness #2, 2A, 2B and 2C. Before you can remove the fuel injector wiring harness you will have to disconnect seven sensors which are part of the same wiring harness (#1) which goes under the intake manifold to four separate sensors.

Step Nine: [CCH DIY 016 and 017] First remove the intake manifold tube #4 and vacuum hose #2 then disconnect related air intake sensors #1 and #3. My first surprise is noted in pic 017 by the ? box. What it indicated I did not know at the time, I just annotated it and kept going.

Step Ten: [CCH DIY 018] Disconnect cam timing sensor #5.

Step Eleven: [CCH DIY 020] Disconnect the two crank sensors #7 and #8. I do not know the names of sensors #6 and #9, but disconnect them anyway. Ensure that you disconnect any positional/routing clamps and try not to break them as wiring is routed to keep it protected and away from heated surfaces. Now you have to pull/push/twist the #1 wiring harness through the slot between intakes one and two; you will have to do it one sensor connector at a time as there is just enough space, so do it gently as you do not want to crack any of the sensor connectors or pull out the wires.

Step Twelve: [CCH DIY 023, 024 and 025] Remove "this thing" that is on top of the valve cover. It has two sensor connectors #6 and #8. BE REALLY CAREFUL HERE AS THE VACUUM HOSE CONNECTIONS ARE PLASTIC AND BREAK EASILY. Disconnect the vacuum hoses #1, #7 and #9. Remove mounting bolts #2, #3, #4 and #5 and the entire assembly can be removed. The cloth braiding on the vacuum hose will probably fray and come off and there is nothing that you can do about. I will be replacing all vacuum hoses during re-installation.

Step Thirteen: [CCH DIY 031 & 032] Remove the coil packs; disconnect the wiring harness connections #3 first. I always have a problem pushing the "connector release" to get any wiring harness off, so I made my own tool to do it. I used a piece of a cotter pin which are strong but flexible and if I put too much force on it the cotter pin bends instead of breaking the plastic. This tool works on any size connector. Put the "L" shaped tool in the connector as shown in #3 and with a little twist of the wrist the connector release will "release". Use your other hand to slide the connector off of the coil pack. The coil pack wiring harness is held down by two plastic stoppers #4, simply use a flat head screw driver to pry them up. Remove bolts #1 and #2 and pull out the coil pack; they might be a little difficult to get out if it has been long since their last removal. Lastly #5 is a support bolt for another vacuum hose, remove it.

Step Fourteen: [CCH DIY 036 & 037] Shows what it looks like when all of the items noted above are removed.
 

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No NB Yellow Trifecta :(
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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
I got some work done this past weekend and I'll post the pics a soon as I get them annotated.

I also had some surprises and my parts list is growing.

Also whom ever the previous owners mechanic was did not put the clamps back on the turbo intake hoses; one was there but not clamped on the hose and the other was missing. The heat shield was not on correctly and the clamp there cut through it; also the mount bolt for the big flat metal tube was missing and it was hanging freely [CCH DIY 044].

So when I took these items off, engine oil drained :eek:hnoes: from the intercooler; this is my first turbo, but I do think :confused: that this is normal. So I poked my finger in the intercooler intake tube and there is a substantial pool of oil in it! :scared: [CCH DIY 047]

Also the turbo itself is coated in oil, as it looks wet and shiny; so I'm thinking it might have a bad head gasket as well.

So another surprise was that the oil pan took a hit and big one as it has been sealed buy something that looks like brown tinted glass; so I'll need a new oil pan [CCH DIY OIL PAN].

Yet another surprise was the coolant pipe that follows the frame on the passenger side and loops around to the back was rusting so badly where the plastic clamps hold it to the frame that the clamps are misshapen. Also this pipe connects to the auxiliary water pump at the bottom of the radiator and it has pink crusty residue all around it, so all of that will need to be replaced [CCH DIY RUSTY TUBE] & [CCH DIY 044-A & 044-B].

Step Fifteen: [CCH DIY 039, 041, 042 & 043] Remove Turbo Air Intake tube; disconnect sensor #1 and vacuum tubes #2 and #3. Take care as the vacuum connector is plastic and the intake tube is rubber, so getting it off without breaking something is a challenge. Getting the turbo retaining clip 043-1 off is definitely challenging; be careful not to lose the retaining clip. You will also need to disconnect hose 013-10 and 048-1 and with a little twist the turbo intake tube will come out.

Step Sixteen: [CCH DIY 044, 045 and 047] Remove the Lower Intercooler Pipe, which goes from the turbo (049-2) to the intercooler (047-1) and consists of two metal pipes (upper & lower) with rubber tube connectors. #044-1 is the upper clamp protruding from the heat shield. The heat shield has two snaps that you unsnap so you can slide it down to get to the upper clamp. #3 Is the lower clamp, which mine did not have, nor did it have the bolt #4 which secures the metal tube to the frame, nor did it have the #047-2 for the intercooler connection. So I simply remove intercooler clamp #047-1 and remove the tubing in its entirety. I then slid the heat shield off of the upper tube and removed the #1 clamp. Be gentle with the heat shield or you will rip the seam #045-2, like I did; another part to add to the list! :banghead:

Step Seventeen: [CCH DIY 046, 049 and 050] Remove the Upper Intercooler Pipe, which connects to the lower intercooler pipe on the backside of the cylinder head. The upper intercooler pipe has a heat shield (no picture); this heat shield has several snaps to unsnap and it will come off; take great care or like the lower heat shield you will rip the seam. Then unbolt the two clamp bolts #046-1, #049-1 and the turbo clamp #049-2 and the upper intercooler pipe will come out.
 

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No NB Yellow Trifecta :(
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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Well I got the last parts off of it and I'm ready to remove the head, which I will do this weekend and I have the 16 valve version. I can say that taking a 2.0 head off is a walk in the park compared to a 1.8T! I also found that the use of a mirror very helpful at this point. I just used one of those bathroom cosmetic ones, with an adjustable handle.

Step Eighteen: [CCH DIY 051] Coolant hose/tube connection. There is no need to disconnect this hose as the tube and its heat shield are bolted to the block, not the head.

Step Nineteen: [CCH DIY 052 thru 054] Disconnect the turbo exhaust manifold from the exhaust manifold. Bolt #052-1 cannot be accessed until you remove the heat shield. These bolts are torqued down so it will take some effort to loosen them. There are two bolts that hold the coolant heat shield on; #053-1 can be removed easily; however #054-1 can only be loosened, as it comes in contact with the air intake #042-1 and cannot be removed, so the heat shield cannot be removed.

Tech Note: Bracket #049-1 & 2 is held on by #053-1.

Step Twenty: [CCH DIY 056 thru 062] Remove the valve cover. #056-8 shows you a valve cover bolt that is on the backside out of view. I could not find any instructions for a bolt pattern removal for the valve cover so pic #057 shows the removal pattern that I used. Pic #058 shows the underside of the valve cover. Pic #061 shows the valve train with a cam cover and pic #062 shows the same, except the cam cover has been removed. Is there only supposed to be one cam cover? I thought there should be two.

The only thing left to do now is remove the timing belt and the cylinder head bolts; which is set for this Saturday and it is about time!
 

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No NB Yellow Trifecta :(
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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Well I got a little closer to my objective of removing the cylinder head, with emphasis on little and not because I was not trying.

:stupid: First let me say that I made an assumption; which is something you should never do. :banghead:

My assumption was that the tensioner [CCH DIY 063] is the same as is on the 2.0 NB and this is not the case. Apparently there are two more special tools required, a T10092 (which is a bolt/stud of some type 063-2) and a T40011 (which is a retaining pin 063-3). Also I noticed the white mark on the tensioner and I "assume" it is an alignment mark of some sort. Must have been done by a previous mechanic.

Of course my younger brother had the solution in hand, the exacto knife! :eek: I said, "Dude your :crazy: that is a perfectly good timing belt and I'm not cutting it off!"

However I did manage to do everything else; which amounted to the steps required to do a TB/WP change, without actually making any changes.

The motor must be supported by some alternate means before removing the motor mount. The VW special tools for motor support is expensive, so I opted for the jack with an 18" 2x12 [CCH DIY 067] under the oil pan. Not a recommended method, but it works. Be careful using this method or the oil pan and/or dog bone mount can be damaged; afterwards the motor will move when loosing any bolts that are torqued down.

The pics for these steps are out of work sequence, sorry about that.

Step Twenty-One: [CCH DIY 067] Remove the coolant tube, to give yourself room to get the motor mount out. Disconnecting the rubber hoses, 066-1 and 067-2 (out of view), it will be difficult as they are in awkward positions. I choose to disconnect the tube from the frame clamps, 067-3 and 067-4, it helped a little.

Step Twenty-Two: [CCH DIY 068 and 069] (Danger Will Robinson, Danger...) Removing the lower crank pulley. 068-1 is the serpentine belt, if you have not already removed it, now would be a good time. 068-2 is the Crank Bolt and you will need a 12 point socket for it. The only concern here is not to move the crank out of alignment that was set at the beginning. Some movement is to be expected, so place close attention to it or all of your work will be for naught. 068-3 is the crank pulley alignment mark, which is to ensure that you put the pulley back on the crank gear correctly. To get the pulley bolts 068-4 through 068-7 off, put your 12 point socket wrench on the crank bolt 068-2 and hold it, with the other hand loosen bolts 068-4 through 068-7. The crank pulley is an exact fit on the crank bolt, so some wiggle/wobble of the pulley will be needed to get it off; DO NOT TURN THE PULLEY AND DO NOT FORGET ABOUT THE TIMING MARKS while you are doing it.

Step Twenty-Three: [CCH DIY 069 and 069-A] Removing the lower timing belt cover plates. The notable item here is 069-6, which is the block timing mark; there is a matching alignment mark on the crank pulley.

Step Twenty-Four: [CCH DIY 064, 065, 066 and 067] Removing the frame motor mount; bolts 064-1, 065-2, 065-3, 066-1 and 066-2. 065-3 will be difficult as it is under the coolant/expansion tank; mine was already done as the previous mechanic did not bolt it back down.

Step Twenty-Five: [CCH DIY 064, 065, 066, 066-A, 066-B and 067] Removing the motor mount; bolts 066-3, 066-4 and 066-5. Bolts 066-4 and 066-5 cannot be removed from the motor mount until it itself has been removed. Removing this part of the motor mount is difficult as it will take some twisting and rotating to get it out. I had to adjust the motor support jack to get mine out.

FYI [CCH DIY 070] Shows the water pump and the lower portion of the timing and serpentine belt tensioners.
 

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No NB Yellow Trifecta :(
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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Well I'm headed over to the hardware store to see if I can find a suitable 5X55mm bolt/washer to make a T10092.

The T40011 will be easy; a cotter pin and key ring will work their, just have to get the right size.

I was amazed how expensive these "tools" are; the T10092 varied from $12 to $30 dollars for a single bolt and the T40011 was a similar cost for a set of three.
 

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Returning senior member
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Water pump...

If you mentioned replacing the water pump I appologize... Just don't forget to replace it... Your pics looked like there has been coolant or just plain water leaking from the front of this engine... Also that coolant pump you mentioned is for cooling down the turbo after you shut down the engine if it is still too hot. Allowing the turbo engine to idle after a high speed run will usually cool everything down enough. This engine was an oil leaker so beware of a bad oil pump and a leak coming from the oil pan, rear seal, etc... Good luck with this lofty repair... beware of a warped head if the donor engine was over heated... One advantage to a 5 valve head is that the exhaust valves are sodium filled for better heat dispersion with the added heat of a turbo... JK
 

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No NB Yellow Trifecta :(
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Discussion Starter #17
Thanks for the info, and yes I plan to a WP/TB, oil cooler and the oil pan upgrade. There are several areas where the coolant has been leaking and I'll be replacing all of those tubes/hoses. I figure by the time I'm done only the block and pistons will be original parts.

I regards to the head, I'll know more once I get it off.
 

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No NB Yellow Trifecta :(
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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
Well I believe that I finally found a compatible bolt/washer for the T10092. I have spent the last two or so weeks educating myself on bolts and washers... talk about OCD... anyway, with aid of Fastenal they had an M5x60mm allen head bolt and washer in stock; I bought the bolt and three washers which cost me $0.58 tax included.

I used these for a test to ensure that the bolt threads and washers (pic attached) were the right size; I was able to thread the bolt with my fingers, so it worked! :cool: :D However there is no room to get an allen head wrench in so I ordered its 8mm hex head equivalent.

I ordered two different size 8mm Hex Head bolts, an M5x50mm (Fastenal P/N# 0121793 $0.24 each) and an M5x60mm (Fastenal P/N# 0122019 $ 0.27 each); also three washers for each (Fastenal P/N# 1133203 $0.14 each).

Fastenal did have an 8mm M5x55 bolt spec, but it is discontinued and cannot be ordered; I wonder why that is :dunno: :confused:

I'll have pics of the other two bolts posted after I pick them up. The tool pics that I found on the internet are very deceptive, as I thought I was looking for a much larger bolt with really coarse threading. I was surprised how small this bolt/washer tool actually is.
 

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No NB Yellow Trifecta :(
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Discussion Starter #19 (Edited)
First let me say that the bolt and washer noted in the above post, I lost at lunch last Friday. An ex-coworker and I meet for lunch every Friday to share our maintenance experiences; he rebuilds early '70's Honda motorcycles. Anyway I performed a Show-n-Tell and left the bolt and washer on the table when we left. The place was packed so the moment we got up from the table they cleaned it and there went my bolt/tool! :banghead:

Well I picked up my version of a T10092 tool and the bolt I lost, along with six washers this morning, the whole thing cost me a $1.59, tax included. So this afternoon I'll have the timing belt off and I'm using a 2MM Allen Wrench as my version of the T40011; more pics to follow...
 

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No NB Yellow Trifecta :(
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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Step Twenty-Six: [CCH DIY 071, 072 and 072A] Remove the timing belt. Make note of the position of the T10092 (bolt/washer) and T40011 (allen wrench) tools 071. Thread T10092 into place with your fingers before putting a wrench to it; if you strip it out you are S.O.L.. While you are threading in T10092 you should be applying slight inward pressure on T40011, because at some point it will go in; this will lock the tensioner piston in place 072 and 072A. Remove T10092 and the tensioner will release the timing belt.

TECH NOTE: The T10092 and T4001 work together to release the tensioner; it is a matched set. I noticed that the M5x60mm did release the tensioner, but just enough, as I still had to struggle to get the timing belt off the CAM. So I'm going to get another M5x60mm and grind it down to 55mm for the reinstall as I do not want to stretch the new belt improperly to get it back on.

Pic CCH DIY 072A shows you what T10092 and T40011 look like when the cylinder head is removed.

Next step is the cylinder head removal.
 

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