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Discussion Starter #1
is excessive on my mother's 2002 NB.

Goes a solid 5 inches before the pedal tightens up. Once you encounter resistance the pedal feel is good. The brakes work properly. Does not seem to be an internal master leak, as the pedal gets hard after the initial overtravel and the brakes work.

So, it's an 02 with about 30K miles on it. We decided to go ahead and do pads/rotors and give the brake system an overall look.

Had a local mechanic do the pads/rotors, as we didn't feel like buying/renting the special caliper reset tool.
They did the work, car is still there with a pedal travel issue. I looked up some more info and gave them the proper procedure to adjust the e-brake/take up for the rear calipers, and have yet to see the results. Hopefully that fixes it. Dad said that whereas the e-brake used to only come up a few clicks and engage it now takes several.

So, I'm looking for other suggestions. I searched and saw a thread similar a few weeks ago, but there's no resolution.

Cliffs notes:
Tons of pedal travel before it gets firm
replaced pads/rotors
adjusting e-brake @ rear calipers
No leaks or squishiness that would indicate air in the system or a master cyl problem.
I should also note that after new pads the fluid level in the master cylinder is right back to the full mark, so there's definitely not been any leakage.
 

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Jitterbug
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"Dad said that whereas the e-brake used to only come up a few clicks and engage it now takes several."

That is the key to it, the e-brake has more travel too so it is a rear caliper issue. In my experience the e-brake and hydraulics can get out of step when the pistons are wound back in. Good news is that normal use will resolve it but you can improve it by having someone apply the brakes while someone else works the e-brake lever on each caliper to make sure all slack is taken out of the e-brake mechanism inside the rear caliper. A combination of apply the footbrake and working the e-brake levers, then applying the e-brake fully and working the footbrake did it for me... then over the next 100miles the pedal came fully back to how it was before the pad change.

If not...

Did they definitely change the rear rotors? - if you put new pads in with old rotors sometimes you can end up with more travel until they have bedded in (worn to the shape of the old rotor).

Check all the rotors for run-out, excessive on 1 or more rotors will add up to more travel in use but seem fine when stationary.

If you pump the pedal is there any change?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
thanks for hte response.
The rear rotors were turned.

We tried the e-brake trick and it was much improved, but still eccessive. Going to drive it and see if the pedal continues to come up.
 
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