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Discussion Starter #1
Well I have been for my drive and everything seems A-OK and my heat was hotter than crap. Here are a few of my mistakes and or obstacles I encountered.

1.) I could not remove the cooling hose from the oil cooler to drain the block, so once the radiator was emptied via the drain port I thought all was well and stopped there. When I removed the water pump I had a huge rush of coolant all over the place. Lesson learned.

2.) The part of the engine mounting system that actually bolts to the engine is a PITA to remove. It's relatively easy to remove the bolts but actually removing it from the engine bay was very hard for me. I was raising and lower the engine to try to find room. In the end, it finally just sort of fell out though the rear of the engine bay. It looked so easy, but I really struggled for a while. Also, when replacing this piece, I could not get my torque wrench on the center bolt. I have one with a 1/2" drive and it would not fit. The only 3/8" drive ones I could find around here were in inch pounds. So you may want to try to find a smaller torque wrench for that bolt. I just torqued the other two and got that one nice and tight with my regular 3/8" wrench.

3.) Tensioner, the verdict is you do not need the little tool you can buy. You can easily clamp a medium sized pair of vice-grips on the little cam part, and put your open end wrench in the middle to tighten the nut. I wasted about 20 minutes on this stupid thing. When I first put it on, and locked it into place I was trying to figure out what was the best way to set the tension. Without the belt on there yet I had my vice-grips on there and was trying to align the little markers, but they would not line up. I then realized that you must have the belt tension on the pulley before the markers will move. Don't waste time doing this too.

4.) The vibration dampener/ribbed belt pulley on the bottom. When I was removing it I noticed a little hole in one spot with a protruding teet like thing, which to me was to make sure you re-align the pulley correctly since it has your timing mark on it. Once removed and I could see it more easily, there are two holes in it which means it can actually be put on two different ways, one in which the timing mark does not line up. Do your self a favor and throw a little white out over one of those holes to be sure you have it correct. It can be done other ways, I used the timing mark on the flywheel also to make sure it was correct. I would suggest this anyways to be safe. But is makes replacing the pulley that much easier and means one less trip to the floor and back up.

5.) Prepare to have someone with EXTREMELY small hands to remove the lower bolt on the thermostat. Or I guess you could remove the alternator. I chose to suffer through turning it about 1/16 turn at a time with my two fingers.

6.) I stripped out the threads on one of the bolts for the bottom timing belt cover. It still tightens up slightly, but will continue turning. I gooped loctite on it and put it in as tight as I could, it should stay there. You may want a smaller and more precise torque wrench for this too. I have the great big one from Oreilly's which evidently isn't good for 7 ft/lbs.

7.) Finally, in testing. I read my Bentley manual and used my advice from you guys on filling the coolant back up. I removed the temp sensor to let it burp but then coolant started pouring out of it. I replaced the temp sensor filled the tank to the max spot then sat in my car and waited for it to cycle the fans like then manual says, keeping very close tabs on that temp light. I bet I sat there for 45 minutes waiting for the stupid thing to cycle. It never did. I felt the lower rad. hose and it was still cold so the thermostat had not opened according to the manual. I realized that with the cooler weather it needed the top engine cover on and the hood shut to build up any heat. Which did in a few minutes with those two things done. Save yourself some time there too.

A couple of things I did not have in my arsenal of tools:
1.) A 6mm allen socket for the lower ribbed belt pulley. I used allen wrenches to remove it, but needed a socket to retorque it.

2.) Small torque wrench with ft/lbs, for the center bolt on the engine mount, engine side.

Overall the job was pretty easy, just very tedious, and time consuming. Imagine an obsessive compulsive person checking timing marks. I probably wasted a lot of time checking and rechecking but I guess you kind of have one shot to get it right. I started Thursday night and worked a few hours both nights, and finished up this morn. Total time wasted, about 8-9 hours. Total money saved, about $650. Thanks for all of your help.
 

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Awesome. :) You survived :)

Sorry about #1; we should probably try to get some kinda how-to together that really explains things like that. I don't know what all I did personally, but I took alot of things off that didn't need to be (like the radiator).

#2; that piece is such a pita. I feel your pain man; that was the worst part of my install. Well that or the thermostat; I was doin' that barely turn it thing too.

Somewhere in there I had no room and had to put a socket on the bolt w/o the wrench before I had room for the wrench.

In the end... you survived, the bug survived, and you won't have to do this for another 70K or so; right? :) Congratulations.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah, I meant to take pictures during but got so wrapped up in getting finished correctly I kind-of forgot. But I did take a few of my parts replaced. My H20 pump looks good, but is cracked in two spots, but still whole. My timing belt looks terrible I think. Lot's of brown dust all over it and it just looks really worn. Perfect timing...
 
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