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Discussion Starter #1
Ok so this has probably been asked before but I couldn't find it. So working all the bugs outta this beetle and up next is radiator replacement due to the green death antifreeze previous owner had put in I don't know how many miles ago. So my question is is there a drain plug in the block I can remove to flush it out good, or is there a good method that works that I don't know about?
 

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Here is a good overview; of a coolant flush:

https://www.pelicanparts.com/techarticles/Volkswagen_Golf_GTI_Mk_IV/36-WATER-Coolant_Flush_and_Replacement/36-WATER-Coolant_Flush_and_Replacement.htm

I typically, remove the thermostat and replace it and this give you another area, to spray water into, to flush and clean out the system/block area.

Use distilled water for the final fill with a 50 water/50 vw spec coolant mix; I use Pentosin Pentofrost SF VW spec coolant or get some coolant from your local VW dealer; Pentosin is typically available, from most auto parts stores.

PENTOFROST SF

Pentosin - Antifreeze

http://www.pentosin.net/specsheets/Pentofrost_SF.pdf

This is also, a good opportunity; to replace common plastic failure parts, that plague these cars.

The aftermarket, has started reproducing the plastic coolant flanges with the coolant temp sensor (off the head) and the thermostat plastic flange/pipe with cast aluminum copies, which would be the last ones you would have to buy, probably forever.

cast aluminium coolant flange 06A121132C

VW New Beetle All 2.0 1998-2005

Cooling Hose Flange (Cast Aluminum)

and

VW Aluminum Cast Thermostat Coolant Flange 06A121121C

https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_trksid=m570.l1313&_nkw=cast+aluminium+coolant+flange+06A121132C+&_sacat=0

Replacing those two plastic flanges alone; would eliminate, a good portion of the typically leaks, plastic part failure points on the new beetle 2.0L, until the rubber o-ring fails and things eventually, start leaking again.

Lastly, if you are going this deep; into repairing and replacing parts on your 2.0L cooling system, you might consider doing the timing and waterpump, if they are due or you don't know, the last time they have been replaced. Check out www.blauparts.com, for high quality oem kits and the deluxe plus versions of the kit, come with vw spec coolant as well. This way, your cars cooling sytem/timing belt, will be fully serviced and all the common failure parts, will be replaced, you will be set for many miles to come! :)

PS: currently, blauparts; has a 15% off sale going on right now.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the info Billy, already did water pump,t-stat and timing belt. Now to finish it off, thanks again.
 

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Ok so still having issues,thinking still have air in the system. Small return hose to tank getting hot, both radiator hoses hot and radiator core hot,cooling fans coming on and cycling off but still pushing coolant out of tank. Used a mighty vac to pull coolant through small hose to reservoir thinking it would pull all air out but I guess it didnt. Any thoughts? Gonna hit up my Matco guy Tuesday since they have a vacuum tool on special right now. Ahh the headaches lol.
 

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Hmmm, based upon your indications/description; of hot coolant, hoses and the heater working, fans coming on... that is a good sign, things are working, coolant is in the system and it is circulating. Most of the time, when there is air in the system; the heater intermittently works, some of the coolant hoses are cold, the thermostat won't open and the fans won't come on. That isn't the case with you; I'm unsure, why the car is overheating but remaing air in the system, is a strong possibility.

What is the current coolant temps and how exactly, is the coolant bottle acting (boiling coolant, overly hot, coolant coming out of the system, etc)? To confirm correct operation of the cooling system: I use a scan tool; like VCDS or a typical OBD II type scanner, to observe the coolant temps and confirm, everything is working as it should and with the use a vacuum filler tool, the air purging/coolant filling process, is a snap, job done. After the vacuum fill; you can rule that out as a possibility and move on to other reasons; the cooling system, is malfunctioning. Until, you have confirmed; all air is out of the system, it is hard to pinpoint, the cause of the problem. The exovcds videos, are very good; in giving you pointers, on what to check and things to look for. Everything, you have mentioned; sounds like, a system, that is similar to a normal working cooling system, aside from the overheating issue.

I would vacuum fill the system; when you draw a vacuum, you can also, use that to see if there are any leaks and confirm, the is sealed and note, if the vacuum, doesn't drop (after holding vacuum; for a number of minutes).

As for a vacuum fill, which is always what I use; as noted, I use the UView vacuum filter tool and like many vacuum based tools, requires the used of compressed/shop air, to work.

The UView 55000 version, which is also sold relabeled; under a number of different truck brands (snapon, mac, etc), is about $120 from amazon (snapon charges $215 and Matco charges $250; for the same relabled UView tool).

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=uview+55000&atb=v140-1&ia=videos

I got mine around the 2007 time frame; when my original waterpump failed and I had to do a timing belt/waterpump swap and ended up needing to purge the cooling system, when I refilled everything after the needed repairs were done on the cooling system. At the time, the UView was one of the few vacuum filter tools available; now, there are many others but the UView tool, is a high quality, fully made of brass unit and I have had it for over 12 years and it still works great.

Having said that, there are many other brands these days; as many modern vehicles, require the use of a vacuum filler tool, to get the air out of the cooling system. Some of the other units; are a combination of cooling system pressure tester and vacuum filler; the UView system, uses vacuum, to test for leaks and does not use pressure, to do that procedure. You may prefer, a combination style design; I cannot vouch, for other tools, as I use UView vacuum filler and a cooling system, pressure tester, to check for leaks, when the coolant is in the car and the pressure testers, tend to cause the coolant to leak out at the source, which can be helpful, in pinpointing the source of coolant leaks.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Gonna pick up an airlift tool from the Matco dude tomorrow. Won't be till this weekend when I have time to get it to my shop and run it through it's paces. Will monitor temps on scanner at that time and let you know what I see. Thanks Billy.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Also just to mention no leaks just boiling out the reservoir like air pushing coolant out. Out of curiosity does cap have to be on reservoir to pressurize system properly. I know some syatems won't work properly untill they are sealed,just not real familiar with VW to be honest.
 

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If it is boiling out; something, is definitely wrong and the system is certainly overheating! :mad: The vacuum fill; is definitely, the first thing I do and you can rule air in the system, being a issue, DONE! Then, if it STILL overheats; you can, move on to other issues (waterpump, blocked radiator, plugged hoses, etc.).

To go over the factory service manual and see the flow chart, to see how the system circulates and other service info:

download the file: aeg_19_nb_cooling.pdf (second link: from the top):

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=volkswagen+2.0L+cooling+system+flow+diagram&atb=v140-1&ia=web

Overview of burping the system; I found, air in my system which is a 1.8T, I always end up using the UView AirLift and it fixes the issue, very quickly, JOB DONE! :)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JnTUr0SEJBw

Like any cooling system; the tank cap, should seal fully and allow the system to work correctly.
 

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Coolant

Remove both hoses coming off the heater core by the fire wall and also disconnect off the coolant flange usually more coolant comes out when u remove those.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ok bought the Matco vacuum tool today. Gonna take it to my shop Saturday and hopefully fix this issue this weekend. Will keep you all posted.
 

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Okay just posting an update used the vacuum tool and now all good at this time,no boiling and temps running about 212 and all seems to be good. Also no the Matco tool is different then the airlift tool at least according to my tool guy. The air lift he said you have to change the hoses on the tool from vac to fill,the Matco tool has both hoses hooked to a central body with valves to switch between. Works great shoulda bought it a long time ago.
 

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That is great news; obviously, getting all rhe air out of the cooling system, makes all the difference! ;)

If you get a chance, post up some photos of your Matco vacuum filler and the model #, that way, others can see the tool and know, what tool, to possibly buy in the future.

For my Uview Airlift 55000; the need to change the hose for vacuuming and then, swap in the other attachment to fill the coolant, is one of the annoyances, when using the tool. It sounds like the Matco version; maybe a improvement in that case, i look forward to seeing the photos of the tool. Thanks! :)
 
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