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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My Beetle is a 2017 1.8 TSI S - U.S. spec Gen3 engine

Any owners having such issues on any version of TSI engines?

I have read many accounts of issues with direct injection engines developing carbon buildup on the intake valves due to no cleansing of fuel flowing through them. The problem develops due to small, normal amounts of oil coming down the valve stem and also introduction of oil into the manifold by suction of the PCV system and hot gases via the EGR.

It is interesting that German-made Gen3 engines have two injection systems; direct injection and manifold (port) injection that solves the problem. But the engines made in Mexico for U.S. sales (vehicles made in the U.S. and Mexico) only have direct injection.

One local VW agency service manager states they have only had a few Gen1 and Gen2 engines requiring intake valve cleaning; no Gen3 versions as yet, but 2017 is only the third model year with the new engine.

Seems I have purchased the wrong car again. However, the problem is also reported on BMW, Mercedes, and some other makes, but VAG vehicles, mostly of VW and Audi manufacture have seen the issue most. It is reported that Snap-On Tool even makes a flange that is bolted to the cylinder head (manifold removed) of BMW engines to assist in valve cleaning.

There is nothing that can be accomplished by additives placed in the fuel tank as no fuel ever flows through the intake valve of a direct injection engine.
 

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Your description of the problem, seems to be in line with what i have heard of the issue; like many new engine technologies, there can be unintended consequenes, that are only realized, when the cars are used long term. As noted direct injection carbon issues are not specific to Volkswagen; living with the problem, I guess you would just view it as another "scheduled maintenace" procedure and following a typical interval, you should be ok. There are a number of videos. (e.g: humble mechanic, dap, etc) and articles online discussing the problem; you might watch/read those for more info, recommendations on preventing the problem (catch cans, cleaners, preventative maintenance, etc).

https://www.google.com/search?q=hum...d+up&ie=UTF-8&oe=UTF-8&hl=en-us&client=safari

Ultimately, it maybe another maintenace procedure owners will have to live with until VW addresses the issue with the direct injwction design and eliminates the cause of the problem, by adding extra injectors to keep things clean or redesign the fuel delievery system, to address the issue. As noted, here in the USA we VW owners, tend to not get many things, that German or European spec vehicles get, hopefully VW will eventually address the problem soon or maybe electric vehicles will make the issue a moot point? This is just one of many historical problems with VW engines, it is best, if you decide to live with a vehicle with the problem; to do your best to follow a preventative maintence routine and service things that are known to contribute ti the problem. Aside from agonizing over inherent problems with a car , I think that is the best you can do with the carbon issue or get another vehicle or automotive brand that is known, to not have the problem. It seems this can be the price is owners pay, when German engineers attempt newer cutting edge engine technologies and we are stuck with the teething problems, these new designs end up having.
 
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