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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 1999 Beetle 1.8T has thrown the DTC P1355. I have replaced all four ignition coils and all four spark plugs, to no avail. I cleared the code after the repair was complete, but the CEL went back on the next day after I started the car up.

I have read about the ground wire repair for VW 2002 - 2004 Golf/Jetta/Beetle (A4) cars but that does not apply to the 1999 Beetle 1.8T since there is no 6-pin ignition coil connector.

Has anyone experienced this issue? Any suggestions for fixing it would be appreciated.

Cheers!
 

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17763/P1355 - Ross-Tech Wiki

What brand coils; did you buy to replace them with? The genuine vw oem Bremi (push in) or Hitachi (bolt down); depending on your application is crucial, to get the best performance needed for the 1.8T to run correctly. VW has had a number of coil pack recalls; the current version, seems to be much better and less failure prone (VW part #06A905115D). Here are some examples of 1.8T VW coils available these days:

https://www.ecstuning.com/Volkswagen-Golf_IV--1.8T/News/MKIV18t_CoilpackOptions/

When removing coils; take particular care with them as they can be damaged. It is not recommended to pry them out with a pry bar or screwdriver. They sell removal tools but using some spare wire or tie wraps; can be a no stress tool, to help you pull them out straight without damaging them. It is recommended to use dialectic ignition grease; to the spark plug connector/boots, to make removal easier and keep them from fusing to the plugs.

As for your particular situation; that seems to be cylinder #1 specifically. There are a number of common problems with the 1.8T in particular:

1. bad or poor quality coils; you can change the coil position and see if the misfire "travels" to the new location. DO NOT purchase; aftermarket brand coils, that are typically available from most local auto parts stores.

2. plugs/wiring: many of the wires can deteriorate and cause grounding out and misfire issues.

a. inspect the wires for the the insulation coming off, cracks and any visible damage to the harness.

b. check the plastic coil plugs/connectors; broken locking clips or cracked housings, can cause the connection to not be secure and a misfire will result. You can use a tie wrap to secure the coil/plug; as a temporary fix, until you replace the plug.

c. testing of the wiring harness to the ecu and possibly a bad ecu, would be the worst case scenario.

3. fuel injector

a. check for power from the ecu; at the plug and you can use a "noid" light to confirm this diagnosis.

b. see if there is fuel flow from the injector; you can use the "swap" method as well, to determine if the injector isn't working and if the misfire "travels" to the new location.

4. compression loss or damaged cylinder (e.g. valves, rings or head gasket)

a. compressor leak down test; would confirm whether there is a problem or not.

b. fouled or damaged spark plug; remove and inspect, replace or move to another location to confirm issue.

5. vacuum leaks or fuel pressure issues

a. fuel pressure gauge would confirm fuel pressure is to spec

b. vacuum leaks; can be tested with smoke testing, checking all the connections, isolating audible sounds (with a mechanic's stethoscope) or spraying fluid like carb cleaner to see if the engine changes rpm to find the source of the leak.

SERVICE MANUAL INFO:

coil packs; testing and replacement:

http://workshop-manuals.com/volkswa...ation/locations/component_locations_overview/

fuel injector; testing and replacement:

http://workshop-manuals.com/volkswa...ion/specifications/electrical_specifications/

testing fuel pressure:

http://workshop-manuals.com/volkswa...essure_vacuum_and_temperature_specifications/

As for repairing the wiring harness or a bad plug; you can get a whole wiring harness replacement from VW or just purchase a plug/wire kit, to splice into the existing harness. The other option for a bad plug; is to just replace the plug itself and you can get those from your local VW dealer or online.

Here are examples of what I am referring to:

Electrical Connector Housing - 4 Pin Does not come with terminals or wires:
VW part #: 4B0973724

https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=4B0973724

IGNITION COIL PACK CONNECTOR REPAIR KIT:
Bremi part #: 2011340

https://www.google.com/search?q=Bre...=91&ie=UTF-8#q=1.8T+coil+connector+repair+kit

Genuine VW Coil Pack Wiring Harness Replacement
VW part #: 1J0971658L

https://www.google.com/search?q=1J0...rome..69i57&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=91&ie=UTF-8

Good VWVORTEX thread; about options and solutions to coil pack harness/plugs problems:

http://forums.vwvortex.com/showthre...cement-Repair-and-Heat-Shields&highlight=coil

install and tech bulletin:

http://www.uspmotorsports.com/downloads/vw.tb.97-04-02.pdf

Here is some good information; from STI/KARLYN a major Bremi distributor in the USA:

Coil on Plug (COP) Warranty and Diagnosis
Karlyn Industries/STI distributes high quality COP components. We utilize independent engineers to
monitor our coils and test warranties. Most coils that are returned DO NOT have a problem.
Rough running engines that set misfire codes can have multiple causes. It is the responsibility of the
dealer/installer of our products to verify that the following items of inspection have been performed,
in order to comply with warranty replacement.
General misfire codes are most likely due to an intake vacuum leak or fuel delivery problem. Misfire
codes identifying a particular cylinder are usually due to a fouled spark plug, dirty or dead fuel injector
or loss of compression in the cylinder (burned or bent valve, weak or broken valve spring or leaky
head gasket.)
If the crankshaft position sensor fails, the loss of the basic timing signal will prevent the system from
generating a spark and the engine will not start or run. A failed driver circuit within the powertrain
control module (PCM) can kill an individual coil and prevent that cylinder from firing. Replacing the coil
without addressing the cause will only result in another damaged coil.
Misfire codes can also be triggered from a damaged wire harness due to poor grounds. Inspect the
wire harness carefully. You may have to cut back the insulation to verify that there is no corrosion or
melting of the wire harness due to poor grounds. A faulty harness can cause the coil to fail. If you
simply install a new COP it may seem like you have corrected the problem but, merely replacing the
coil without repairing the grounding problem may result in future coil failures.
In summary, it is important to remember that ignition misfire can also be caused by other factors such
as worn or fouled spark plugs, loose or damaged coil connectors or terminals, dirty fuel injectors,
low fuel pressure, intake vacuum leaks, loss of compression in a cylinder, even a tank full of "bad" gas
contaminated with water. These other possibilities should all be ruled out before a COP unit is
replaced. (Note: A fouled spark plug can damage the COP. We recommend that you always replace
the spark plugs when you replace the COP units & that all the ignition coils be replaced at the same
time. As a form of preventive maintenance we suggest this be done every 60,000 miles).
We warranty our coils free from factory defect (12 months or 12,000 miles).
We will do our job to monitor and test the integrity of our coils. We hope that this information will help
you to enhance the reliability and credibility of your repair while complementing our product. The
main goal here is a real solution to your ignition problem which will result in happy customers.
Temporary solutions will only result, in the return of non-defective parts and in unhappy customers
who will continue to have the same problem.

HARNESS AND COIL PLUG REPAIR INFO:

VW/AUDI COIL HARNESS/CONNECTOR REPAIR KIT
Failed or burned up VW/Audi ignition coils are most commonly caused by poor electrical connections, wire
harness breaks or fouled spark plugs.
Up until now, there has not been a cost effective kit available to aid with VW/AUDI coil harness/connector
repairs. Bremi/STI has developed a Kit (#20113/40) that contains the parts and tool needed to replace the
self locking connector housing and to make simple harness lead repairs for all the popular VW/Audi Ignition
Coils, including Karlyn/STI coil #’s 11961T, 11963T, 11971T, 20112, 20115, 20121, 20122, 20126, 20127,
20128 & 20130.
Each kit contains;
4 - High temperature leads and terminals,
all pre-assembled in an
OE type connector housing.
4 - Heat Shrink Butt Connectors
1 - Terminal Extractor Tool
#20113/40
You should replace all the connectors every time you replace a coil especially if you had more than one coil
failure. A loose connection (caused by engine vibration, a cracked connector housing etc.) can cause a
voltage spike which may not only destroy or burn up the coil it is attached to but also a neighboring coil
because the harness wires are bridged together. The OE connectors to the coils are not designed to be
repeatedly unplugged and re-plugged. The locking features of the connector housing are critical to maintain
positive terminal contact. That is why OE recommends replacing the connectors if there is a chance of a
loose connection. (see picture below)
Broken insulation on the wire harness (see picture below) can cause a voltage spike (misfire) that can destroy
or burn up the coils. Harness related connectivity problems are very common and are usually the cause of
coil problems when one has experienced more than one coil failure. Inspect the harness wires carefully for
any cracks in the insulation and have them immediately repaired or replaced by an authorized VW repair
shop.
You may utilize Kit (#20113/40) to make simple harness lead repairs.
PLEASE NOTE: NO PART OF THIS KIT SHOULD BE ATTEMPTED WITHOUT FIRST HAVING THE FOLLOWING;
A: BASIC KNOWLEDGE OF THE USE OF MECHANICAL HAND TOOLS
B: THE FACTORY REPAIR MANUAL AND UNDERSTANDING WHAT YOU READ. REFER TO (https://erwin.audi.com) (https://erwin.vw.com)
C: A SAFETY UNDERSTANDING.
D: IF AT ANYTIME YOU FEEL YOU ARE OVER YOUR HEAD, YOU SHOULD REFER TO A VW/AUDI AUTHORIZED REPAIR FACILITY.

For more info and pictures; refer to the catalog here:

http://www.karlynsti.com/2015 Direct Ignition Catalog.pdf
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks billymade,

I'll take a day to absorb all this information.

I purchased Bremi ignition coils for the Beetle and NGK spark plugs. Then I'll move to inspecting the ignition wiring harness. I can say that two of the ignition coil connectors have broken locking tabs, but cylinder #1 is not one of those coils.

I will change the coil position and see if the misfire "travels" to the new location, as a start.

Cheers!

17763/P1355 - Ross-Tech Wiki

What brand coils; did you buy to replace them with? The genuine vw oem Bremi (push in) or Hitachi (bolt down); depending on your application is crucial, to get the best performance needed for the 1.8T to run correctly. VW has had a number of coil pack recalls; the current version, seems to be much better and less failure prone (VW part #06A905115D). Here are some examples of 1.8T VW coils available these days:

https://www.ecstuning.com/Volkswagen-Golf_IV--1.8T/News/MKIV18t_CoilpackOptions/

When removing coils; take particular care with them as they can be damaged. It is not recommended to pry them out with a bar or screwdriver. They sell removal tools but using some spare wire or tie wraps; can be a no stress tool, to help you pull them out straight without damaging them. It is recommended to use dialectic ignition grease; to the spark plug connector/boots, to make removal easier and keep them from fusing to the plugs.

As for your particular situation; that seems to be cylinder #1 specifically. There are a number of common problems with the 1.8T in particular:

1. bad or poor quality coils; you can change the coil position and see if the misfire "travels" to the new location. DO NOT purchase; aftermarket brand coils, that are typically available from most local auto parts stores.

2. plugs/wiring: many of the wires can deteriorate and cause grounding out and misfire issues.

a. inspect the wires for the the insulation coming off, cracks and any visible damage to the harness.

b. check the plastic coil plugs/connectors; broken locking clips or cracked housings, can cause the connection to not be secure and a misfire will result. You can use a tie wrap to secure the coil/plug; as a temporary fix, until you replace the plug.

c. testing of the wiring harness to the ecu and possibly a bad ecu, would be the worst case scenario.

3. fuel injector

a. check for power from the ecu; at the plug and you can use a "noid" light to confirm this diagnosis.

b. see if there is fuel flow from the injector; you can use the "swap" method as well, to determine if the injector isn't working and if the misfire "travels" to the new location.

4. compression loss or damaged cylinder (e.g. valves, rings or head gasket)

a. compressor leak down test; would confirm whether there is a problem or not.

b. fouled or damaged spark plug; remove and inspect, replace or move to another location to confirm issue.

5. vacuum leaks or fuel pressure issues

a. fuel pressure gauge would confirm fuel pressure is to spec

b. vacuum leaks; can be tested with smoke testing, checking all the connections, isolating audible sounds (with a mechanic's stethoscope) or spraying fluid like carb cleaner to see if the engine changes rpm to find the source of the leak.

SERVICE MANUAL INFO:

coil packs; testing and replacement:

Volkswagen Workshop Manuals > Beetle L4-1781cc 1.8L Turbo (APH) (1999) > Powertrain Management > Ignition System > Ignition Coil > Component Information > Locations > Component Locations, Overview

fuel injector; testing and replacement:

Volkswagen Workshop Manuals > Beetle L4-1781cc 1.8L Turbo (APH) (1999) > Powertrain Management > Fuel Delivery and Air Induction > Fuel Injector > Component Information > Specifications > Electrical Specifications

testing fuel pressure:

Volkswagen Workshop Manuals > Beetle L4-1781cc 1.8L Turbo (APH) (1999) > Powertrain Management > Tune-up and Engine Performance Checks > Fuel Pressure > System Information > Specifications > Pressure, Vacuum and Temperature Specifications

As for repairing the wiring harness or a bad plug; you can get a whole wiring harness replacement from VW or just purchase a plug/wire kit, to splice into the existing harness. The other option for a bad plug; is to just replace the plug itself and you can get those from your local VW dealer or online.

Here are examples of what I am referring to:

Electrical Connector Housing - 4 Pin Does not come with terminals or wires:
VW part #: 4B0973724

https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=4B0973724

IGNITION COIL PACK CONNECTOR REPAIR KIT:
Bremi part #: 2011340

https://www.google.com/search?q=Bre...=91&ie=UTF-8#q=1.8T+coil+connector+repair+kit

Genuine VW Coil Pack Wiring Harness Replacement
VW part #: 1J0971658L

https://www.google.com/search?q=1J0...rome..69i57&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=91&ie=UTF-8

Good VWVORTEX thread; about options and solutions to coil pack harness/plugs problems:

VWVortex.com - REFERENCE: 1.8t Coil Pack Replacement, Repair, and Heat Shields

install and tech bulletin:

http://www.uspmotorsports.com/downloads/vw.tb.97-04-02.pdf

Here is some good information; from STI/KARLYN a major Bremi distributor in the USA:

Coil on Plug (COP) Warranty and Diagnosis
Karlyn Industries/STI distributes high quality COP components. We utilize independent engineers to
monitor our coils and test warranties. Most coils that are returned DO NOT have a problem.
Rough running engines that set misfire codes can have multiple causes. It is the responsibility of the
dealer/installer of our products to verify that the following items of inspection have been performed,
in order to comply with warranty replacement.
General misfire codes are most likely due to an intake vacuum leak or fuel delivery problem. Misfire
codes identifying a particular cylinder are usually due to a fouled spark plug, dirty or dead fuel injector
or loss of compression in the cylinder (burned or bent valve, weak or broken valve spring or leaky
head gasket.)
If the crankshaft position sensor fails, the loss of the basic timing signal will prevent the system from
generating a spark and the engine will not start or run. A failed driver circuit within the powertrain
control module (PCM) can kill an individual coil and prevent that cylinder from firing. Replacing the coil
without addressing the cause will only result in another damaged coil.
Misfire codes can also be triggered from a damaged wire harness due to poor grounds. Inspect the
wire harness carefully. You may have to cut back the insulation to verify that there is no corrosion or
melting of the wire harness due to poor grounds. A faulty harness can cause the coil to fail. If you
simply install a new COP it may seem like you have corrected the problem but, merely replacing the
coil without repairing the grounding problem may result in future coil failures.
In summary, it is important to remember that ignition misfire can also be caused by other factors such
as worn or fouled spark plugs, loose or damaged coil connectors or terminals, dirty fuel injectors,
low fuel pressure, intake vacuum leaks, loss of compression in a cylinder, even a tank full of "bad" gas
contaminated with water. These other possibilities should all be ruled out before a COP unit is
replaced. (Note: A fouled spark plug can damage the COP. We recommend that you always replace
the spark plugs when you replace the COP units & that all the ignition coils be replaced at the same
time. As a form of preventive maintenance we suggest this be done every 60,000 miles).
We warranty our coils free from factory defect (12 months or 12,000 miles).
We will do our job to monitor and test the integrity of our coils. We hope that this information will help
you to enhance the reliability and credibility of your repair while complementing our product. The
main goal here is a real solution to your ignition problem which will result in happy customers.
Temporary solutions will only result, in the return of non-defective parts and in unhappy customers
who will continue to have the same problem.

HARNESS AND COIL PLUG REPAIR INFO:

VW/AUDI COIL HARNESS/CONNECTOR REPAIR KIT
Failed or burned up VW/Audi ignition coils are most commonly caused by poor electrical connections, wire
harness breaks or fouled spark plugs.
Up until now, there has not been a cost effective kit available to aid with VW/AUDI coil harness/connector
repairs. Bremi/STI has developed a Kit (#20113/40) that contains the parts and tool needed to replace the
self locking connector housing and to make simple harness lead repairs for all the popular VW/Audi Ignition
Coils, including Karlyn/STI coil #’s 11961T, 11963T, 11971T, 20112, 20115, 20121, 20122, 20126, 20127,
20128 & 20130.
Each kit contains;
4 - High temperature leads and terminals,
all pre-assembled in an
OE type connector housing.
4 - Heat Shrink Butt Connectors
1 - Terminal Extractor Tool
#20113/40
You should replace all the connectors every time you replace a coil especially if you had more than one coil
failure. A loose connection (caused by engine vibration, a cracked connector housing etc.) can cause a
voltage spike which may not only destroy or burn up the coil it is attached to but also a neighboring coil
because the harness wires are bridged together. The OE connectors to the coils are not designed to be
repeatedly unplugged and re-plugged. The locking features of the connector housing are critical to maintain
positive terminal contact. That is why OE recommends replacing the connectors if there is a chance of a
loose connection. (see picture below)
Broken insulation on the wire harness (see picture below) can cause a voltage spike (misfire) that can destroy
or burn up the coils. Harness related connectivity problems are very common and are usually the cause of
coil problems when one has experienced more than one coil failure. Inspect the harness wires carefully for
any cracks in the insulation and have them immediately repaired or replaced by an authorized VW repair
shop.
You may utilize Kit (#20113/40) to make simple harness lead repairs.
PLEASE NOTE: NO PART OF THIS KIT SHOULD BE ATTEMPTED WITHOUT FIRST HAVING THE FOLLOWING;
A: BASIC KNOWLEDGE OF THE USE OF MECHANICAL HAND TOOLS
B: THE FACTORY REPAIR MANUAL AND UNDERSTANDING WHAT YOU READ. REFER TO (https://erwin.audi.com) (https://erwin.vw.com)
C: A SAFETY UNDERSTANDING.
D: IF AT ANYTIME YOU FEEL YOU ARE OVER YOUR HEAD, YOU SHOULD REFER TO A VW/AUDI AUTHORIZED REPAIR FACILITY.

For more info and pictures; refer to the catalog here:

http://www.karlynsti.com/2015 Direct Ignition Catalog.pdf
 

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Well, those connectors should be replaced eventually; you might go ahead and use a tie wrap, to secure them to the coil. All the connectors; eventually break, as the heat of the engine makes them brittle. The bremi repair kits; are not cost effective in my opinion and actually buying a new harness is actually cheaper. The plugs from the VW dealer are in the $17-$25 range but you can find them cheaper on ebay (set of four: $12-$25 range).

VW Ignition Coil Connector Repair Kit

VW Ignition Coil Connector Repair Kit | eBay
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
DTC P1355 - Cylinder 1, Ignition circuit Open Circuit REPLY TO THREAD

Well, those connectors should be replaced eventually; you might go ahead and use a tie wrap, to secure them to the coil. All the connectors; eventually break, as the heat of the engine makes them brittle. The bremi repair kits; are not cost effective in my opinion and actually buying a new harness is actually cheaper. The plugs from the VW dealer are in the $17-$25 range but you can find them cheaper on ebay (set of four: $12-$25 range).

VW Ignition Coil Connector Repair Kit

VW Ignition Coil Connector Repair Kit | eBay
Thanks again for all the good information billymade,

I'm going to focus on the wiring for cylinder #1 coil connector (and others too), with the hope that it's cracked insulation on the wires. I had the harness off a couple of years ago when I replaced the valve cover gasket, so I know what I'm getting myself into (nothing really).

The car really does run good, with no hesitating or other symptoms of power loss or lack of response. It's just this one code that is preventing me from passing an emissions test.

My gut tells me that since I'm only getting only P1355 for cylinder #1, that it is the wiring and not a vacuum leak(s). I would expect that I would be seeing multiple cylinders misfiring if it was a vacuum leak, but maybe not.

I'll pick up a can of carb cleaner and maybe even a smoke tool as well. I've never replaced any of the vacuum lines, so I could very well have a small leak somewhere.

Can you recommend a source for an ignition coil wiring harness? I may consider replacing the harness if necessary.

Thanks again.
 

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Well, it depends if you just replace one plug/terminal ends per cylinder as a kit (total of 4) or replace the whole thing. The whole wiring harness is a genuine vw part and most of the repair kits are made by Bremi or other sources that are cheaper, if you look on ebay.

IGNITION COIL PACK CONNECTOR REPAIR KIT:
Bremi part #: 2011340

Genuine VW Coil Pack Wiring Harness Replacement
VW part #: 1J0971658L


As usual; ebay and amazon.com; seem to have the best prices

https://www.google.com/search?q=IGN...+1.8T+IGNITION+COIL+PACK+CONNECTOR+REPAIR+KIT

Here is a full diy; on the vw replacement harness:

http://forums.vwvortex.com/showthread.php?4919803-MKIV-Ignition-Coil-Wiring-Harness-Replacement-DIY

Another option; is a custom wiring harness sold by 034 Motorsports a vw/audi tuning company. They chose to create sub harness assembly; that does not require major disassembly and re pinning all the terminals back to the ecu, like the genuine vw harness does. They claim; the wire they use is better quality; added some protective boots and make it; so the harness can be unplugged when doing maintenance on the car. This solution; is more expensive but the quality of the components maybe better, last longer and be easier to install:

REPAIR/UPDATE HARNESS, AUDI/VOLKSWAGEN 1.8T WITH 4-WIRE COILS

SKU: 034-701-0004

Manufacturer: 034Motorsport

https://store.034motorsport.com/harness-update-repair-1-8t-4-wire-coil.html

install info:

https://store.034motorsport.com/docs/1.8T Coil update install instructions.pdf

As noted before; here is a excellent thread discussing the harness problems, replacement and heat shielding options, once you install the a new one.

VWVortex.com - REFERENCE: 1.8t Coil Pack Replacement, Repair, and Heat Shields
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
DTC P1355 - Cylinder 1, Ignition circuit Open Circuit REPLY TO THREAD

Thanks billymade,

I'm going to to start with replacing the ignition coil connector for cylinder #1 this Saturday. I ordered one Karlyn (Bremi) replacement kit to start. I picked up the kit for under $40 CAN. I just ordered three more this morning. It can't hurt to replace all four connectors, considering they are all original and are as brittle as sun-baked plastic (in this case more like oven-baked).

I'll report back and let you know the outcome for cylinder #1 at least. Not sure if the other three connectors will arrive by Saturday.

Cheers!
 

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Yeah, at the price of $40 x 4 @ $160; it would be more cost effective to just buy the whole new harness from Volkswagen at less than $100. I have been in this dilemma for awhile; as a number of my connectors were cracked and the locking tabs were broken. I just went ahead and replaced some of the housings, as it was a cheaper solution but eventually a new harness maybe in my future. The connector kits on ebay; were cheaper but I don't know, if they are the same quality as the
Bremi versions.

The 034 Motorsports solution; is just slightly more than the $160 you spend on the repair kits and it is a whole new assembly, replacing all the wiring on top of the valve cover.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So I replaced the connectors for all four ignition coils, but used the existing wiring for cylinders 2, 3, and 4. For cylinder #1 I replaced wires 1, 2, an 3 and used wire #4. Wire #4 is a common ground for all four connectors and is fastened to the valve cover. I examined the ground wires from each connector and they looked good to me.

For connector #1 I cut wires #1, 2, and 3 back as far as I could get, before the harness heads down to the underside of the battery, spliced the wires together and reassembled everything. I was quite surprised at the light gauge wiring VW uses for wire #3 on the connectors. It's a very fine gauge. The gauge of wire the Bremi connectors came with is much heavier.

Anyway, I reassembled everything except for the wiring harness (just in case the problem is not solved) and started the car up. It started first thing and ran nice. Since the battery was disconnected for long enough, the codes were erased but the CEL came after just a few seconds of the engine idling. I shut it down and checked the codes thrown, P1355 Cylinder 1 Ignition Circuit - open Circuit, and P1602 - Power Supply Terminal 30 - Voltage too low. I cleared the codes. Started her back up after a minute and waited without holding my breath. No CEL light while idling, but it lit up when I started revving the engine.

Shut her down again and I cleared the codes. Waited a few minutes and decided to put her back in the garage and call it an evening. When I started her up and pulled her into the garage, no CEL light lit up. So that's how I ended the evening.

I'll check it out tomorrow afternoon and see what happens when I take her for a short drive around the block. I have to admit that I'm not feeling very optimistic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I was doing some troubleshooting this afternoon on the Beetle, and some wiring harness reassembly, and some proper spark plug installation (torque, dielectric grease). It occurred to me that I should really post a copy of the VCDS file that I saved from the ECM. It follows:

Saturday,16,January,2016,14:53:17:24241
VCDS -- Windows Based VAG/VAS Emulator Running on Windows 8 x64
VCDS Version: 15.7.3.0 (x64)
Data version: 20151216
Ross-Tech: Home


VIN: 3VWCD21C1XM468331 License Plate: BDPS 397
Mileage: 218041 Repair Order:
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Address 01: Engine Labels: 06A-906-032-AVC.lbl
Control Module Part Number: 06A 906 032 B
Component and/or Version: 19MATA31.HEX 230G 2846
Software Coding: 10143
Work Shop Code: WSC 03037
VCID: 1D3FDC7C97EF7FD67A-5178
1 Fault Found:

17763 - Cylinder 1 Ignition Circuit
P1355 - 35-00 - Open Circuit

Readiness: 0110 1101

I followed the troubleshooting instructions for the ignition system (Chapter 28 Bentley) and the ignition coil and power output stage, testing. I checked the voltage across terminals 1 and 4, and then terminals 1 and 2. The voltage was 11.6V for each reading. Minimum voltage specified is 11.5V.

I haven't figured out yet how I'm going to check the signal from the ECM across terminals 2 and 3. I can't seem to find an auto parts retailer that sells an LED test light.

Checking for a signal from the ECM will be my next task to complete. Any leads on a decent LED test light would be greatly appreciated.

I drove the car around the block, after erasing the 17763 - P1355 code, and the CEL didn't light up until I had driven about 1,000 feet. I'm stymied on this one. The code is being thrown on an intermittent basis. But it is being thrown, regardless and it's just a matter of time before it's thrown after each time it's erased.
 

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17763/P1355 - Ross-Tech Wiki

Yeah, narrowed down to just one cylinder; you just have to really check your rewiring connections carefully and do the testing procedures shown in the service manual.

Circuit testing tools:

This is the one; shown as per the factory vw manual:

Diode test lamp V.A.G 1527

https://vw.snapon.com/SpecialToolsDetail.aspx?itemId=34320013

superseded by a special testing tool; kinda looks like a power probe?

Hybrid Voltage Tester Model: VAS6839

From the pictures and specs given; looks like a Fluke.

It looks like you could get this LED circuit tester from Harbor Freight for $12 and it would protect your ecu from damage and light up for low voltage pulses.

Computer Safe Automotive Logic Probe

Cen-Tech - Item#98709


Quickly and safely test high and low voltages on almost all vehicle circuits, including computerized engine and body controls, with this computer safe automotive logic probe. The circuit tester features color coded battery clips and dual color LED indicators. This automotive logic probe draws less than 7 milliamps and is a great tool for any automotive do-it-yourselfer or professional mechanic to test power and ground voltages on vehicles.
High impedance -- current draws less than 7 milliamps
Quickly and safely tests high and low voltages on all vehicle circuits, including computerized engine and body controls
Tests power and ground voltages
Dual color LED indicates red for power and green for ground on 6, 12 and 24 volt systems
Color coded battery clips
10 ft. coiled lead

Sale: $10.99 (check online for a 20% off coupon)


Computer Safe Automotive Logic Probe

There are other companies; that make a similar tool like: CTA, OTC, etc. I would assume that in Canada without Habor Freight, your local auto parts store or Princess Auto, should have something similar or just get one off of amazon.com.

There are some Harbor Freight stores in Buffalo, New York:

https://goo.gl/oZSYgQ

https://www.google.com/search?q=Flu...me&es_sm=91&ie=UTF-8#q=automotive+logic+probe

http://www.amazon.ca/s/ref=nb_sb_no...ias=aps&field-keywords=Automotive+Logic+Probe

Here are the testing procedures WITHOUT; the VW factory scan tool:

Volkswagen Workshop Manuals > Beetle L4-1781cc 1.8L Turbo (APH) (1999) > Powertrain Management > Ignition System > Ignition Coil > Component Information > Testing and Inspection > With Manufacturer's Scan Tool > Page 5356

Another testing procedure you can do with VCDS; is "misfire counting". You could run this; while the engine is running and try a "wiggle" test and see if moving the wiring harness causes a misfire. This might help figure out; where a circuit break or bad connection is, from the coil plug to the ecu.

http://www.ross-tech.com/vag-com/m_blocks/010-019.html

select control module: engine: measuring blocks: channels: (type in 014, next one 015, next one 16)

More info and video; showing VCDS screen:

https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=vcds misfire counter
 

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Hybrid Voltage Tester Model: VAS6839

From the pictures and specs given; looks like a Fluke T5-600 USA
I can tell you the Hybrid Voltage Tester is NOT a Fluke T5-600.

I have a Fluke T5-1000 in my hands and it is VERY different than than the VAS6839.

What the VAS6839 appears to be is a Fluke T150 Voltage and Continuity Tester.

Not seen the T150 by itself often - http://www.tequipment.net/Fluke/T150/PRV240/Voltage-and-Continuity-Testers/?v=0

Here is a link with some better pictures - http://www.amazon.co.uk/Fluke-T150-Tester/dp/B00B1PL7AU
 

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Can you tell; which one it is? The Snap On supplier site; says its Fluke but not which model... :confused:

https://vw.snapon.com/SpecialToolsDetail.aspx?itemId=42740013


Hybrid Voltage Tester
Model: VAS6839
Price: $184.13 *

The voltage tester is required for checking that the voltage has been isolated on hybrid vehicles.
Voltage tester for use in the workshop on hybrid vehicles. Very sturdy housing with protection against dust and water splashes.
Readings can be taken easily thanks to LED and LCD display. Can also be used in poorly lit areas thanks to a light function.

Design and features:
CAT IV 600 V
LED/LCD display

Technical data:
Continuity check: 0 - 400 kΩ
Phase rotation: 100 - 690 V

Warranty
24 months

Manufacturer
Fluke

ASE 401 387 00 000

Maybe, one of these?

T90/T110/T130/T150 Voltage and Continuity Testers

http://www.fluke.com/fluke/iden/ele...-voltage-and-continuity-testers.htm?pid=73757
 

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Almost positive it is the Fluke T150. Seems this is geared more for the European market, in the US you seem to need the kit with the Voltage verifying box. Probably to make sure the tool functions properly. Most likely a legal liability thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Okay, just when I thought I was at the end of the line and was going to have to replace the entire ignition coil wiring harness, I decided to book an appointment with my VW dealer. They've been good to me over the years since my daughter has been driving the Beetle.

It turned out that one of the 4 new ignition coils that I purchased was defective. It was certainly the last thing I suspected. Actually, I didn't even consider it. Not too happy with Bremi. I've advised my supplier and am waiting to hear back from them, hopefully with a return authorization number. The coil is still under warranty so I fully expect that they will either replace the coil under warranty or ask me to deal directly with Bremi.

Regardless, the issue is solved now and the Beetle passed the emissions test this afternoon. On to the safety certification when she's sold!
 

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Hmm, interesting; I thought, you had done the coil pack location swap and came up with the same misfire results? Anyway, glad you got it fixed; finally! Sometimes, when you work on something a long time; you lose your objectivity, you can't see the forest for the trees! At that point; a fresh pair of eyeballs, can really help in the troubleshooting process! Good job! :)
 

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Great info, thanks again for the link below. Just ordered a new Wiring Harness for Pepe Jr. He still has his original, but it is really in bad shape. This is a god send, as the last time I looked for one, VW had just stopped making them.

17763/P1355 - Ross-Tech Wiki

{snip}


Genuine VW Coil Pack Wiring Harness Replacement
VW part #: 1J0971658L

1J0 971 658 L - Google Search

{snip}

For more info and pictures; refer to the catalog here:

http://www.karlynsti.com/2015 Direct Ignition Catalog.pdf
 

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Everett Street in May
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Whats up with your VW? At this time, there are a number of aftermarket solutions; for a whole coil wiring harness, which maybe more cost effective.
Pepe Jr is still kicking, but only getting out to the main GTG's (TOD, Beetles on the Byway, BOD). So he's showing his age now. And yes, I meant to say I just ordered the Coil Harness, not the entire car harness (lol)... :p

Wife and I are looking to make him our Toad when we retire, so I am actually lifting him at the moment. I am also going through and replacing a lot of 20 year old parts, mechanical and electrical. So the intention is to keep him around for as long as we can.

Good news is that there seems to be many more on-line places that now sell a ton of MkIV parts. That is very encouraging.
 
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