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Discussion Starter #1
Can anyone please explain in NON TECHNICAL terms the reason for the ESP button and what it does. And maybe possibly give some examples. I have seen postings out here about this....but they are totally too technical and I NEED examples so I can put myself in the situation.
:rolleyes:
 

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It's snowing but you want to want to get home to pee.The light turns green you floor it (you really gotta go)the tires start to spin and the car starts to slide sideways then you feel a bumping sensation and the light starts flashing and the car starts to go straight again.They aren't spinning as fast anymore and you start to get traction back again.The lesson here is pee before you leave work! Did that help?
 

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You press the button the light goes on and the tires spin like a top. If it was dry on the road you would peel rubber,lay a line or whatever else they call it (burn rubber)
 

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Gina; it's an orange light. It's a warning light. If you press the button, the warning light comes on to tell you it's DEACTIVATED.

Makin' sure it's clear there.

If it flahes, it's actively doing SOMETHING to keep you on the road.
 

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Yeah what noR said. If it flashes it's doing the brakes to keep you safe. If It's on steady it's NOT doing anything. Pushing the button turns it off (triangle light comes on). Is that better?:)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Nice explaination (the pee senario!!)

I understand, so its always on? And pushing the button turns it off? And what happens if you turn it off? And....why would the Salesman tell me that I need to push it when I go for the emission test????:confused:
 

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If you turn it off a light on the dash comes on. And the computer won't interefere by applying brakes to control an "omg I'm out of control and spinning and sliding across the road" situation.

I have no idea what you'd turn it off for emissions testing, but then I have no idea how they go about testing emissions. If it's at idle, there's no point in turning it on or off.

If they have it on a 2wheel dyno, then yes, you'd probably need to turn it off.
 

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ESP is Electronic Stability Program, which is a stability program which will help keep the car going the correct direction when it starts sliding or spinning tires on a slippery road.

ON is the default position, and pressing the button will turn it OFF. When it is off, the orange warning light is on to remind you that it will not save you if you do something stupid.

For emissions testing, they put the front wheels on a rolling road (dyno) so they can test the exhaust gasses under load. The problem now is the rear wheels are not spinning, but the front ones are. The ESP will think this is a problem and shut down the power and stops the front wheels.
When you turn the system off, you can spin the front wheels while the back are stationary.

The ESP is a nice safety system that will help when you take an exit ramp a little fast when it's slippery. It will apply a specific brake to steady the car and prevent a spin. The traction control will help you get going in the snow when there is very little traction. It will limit the engine power to allow you to start moving instead of spinning the front tires.

The earlier cars only had ASR (Anti slip regulation) which is a traction control program only.
The Turbo S and newer cars have both ASR and ESP.

MY TV has ESPN which is better than all of that.

:D
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you!

NJ Turbo said:
ESP is Electronic Stability Program, which is a stability program which will help keep the car going the correct direction when it starts sliding or spinning tires on a slippery road.

ON is the default position, and pressing the button will turn it OFF. When it is off, the orange warning light is on to remind you that it will not save you if you do something stupid.

For emissions testing, they put the front wheels on a rolling road (dyno) so they can test the exhaust gasses under load. The problem now is the rear wheels are not spinning, but the front ones are. The ESP will think this is a problem and shut down the power and stops the front wheels.
When you turn the system off, you can spin the front wheels while the back are stationary.

The ESP is a nice safety system that will help when you take an exit ramp a little fast when it's slippery. It will apply a specific brake to steady the car and prevent a spin. The traction control will help you get going in the snow when there is very little traction. It will limit the engine power to allow you to start moving instead of spinning the front tires.

The earlier cars only had ASR (Anti slip regulation) which is a traction control program only.
The Turbo S and newer cars have both ASR and ESP.

MY TV has ESPN which is better than all of that.

:D
Thanks for the WONDERFUL explaination!!!! I am printing this off and keeping it with me..... (Visual Aid!)
 

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I hadn't thought about it, but, yes, you probably would want to turn it off for emissions testing like NJ Turbo said. At least in Oregon, emissions tests are done under load... meaning the drive wheels are spinning while the non-drive wheels are not... I would imagine ESP would have a problem with that.

But I also turn ESP/ASR off when I'm driving in snow. I learned to drive in snow since very early on, and I'm very comfortable with it. I found having ESP on in snow actually gets in the way of how I want to drive. I think the owner's manual actually suggests turning in off on snow and ice, too.

It's pretty cool technology... but it's not really a differential. It uses the brakes to try to simulate what a differential does. All the same, it's a nice safety feature. Though it'll never replace the good, educated reactions of an experienced driver.
 

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Great explanation i feel like a idiot now for posting why my car bogged down when i had it on when i shifted anything above 5000 into second. I figured it out of course after i made a thread but great explanation on this subject. Is there a way we can add ESP to our ASR only cars????
 

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01GLXTURBO said:
Is there a way we can add ESP to our ASR only cars????
Good question. Since it's all software control of (primarily) already existing components... one would think that flashing the ECU with new firmware might do it. But I don't quite know enough about it to say for sure. It could be that there's a different master cylinder or harness that I'm not aware of. In addition, even if all you would need is newer firmware, there aren't many places that I know of that will reflash an ECU. That would just open them up to a whole slough of lawsuits and legal action if they don't do it exactly right. And shops just aren't willing to take the risk, as far as I've been able to tell. And then you'd definitely need to install the switch to turn the system off as needed.

How 'bout just upgrading the car? ;)
 

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1999-2006 New Beetles

ABS (antilock braking system)

There are sensors on the hubs that monitor wheel speed.

If one or more wheels exceed a predetermined maximum

deacceleration rate it will automaitically pulse that brake or

brakes untill the deacceleration rate goes back with in

parameters. (can not be turned off)



1.8T's

EDL (electronic diferential lock)

For speeds up to 25mph the ECU uses the ABS sensors to determine if

one front wheel is spinning faster than the preset parameters

and will apply braking pressure to the faster spinning wheel

to get the other one up to speed.

It will not prevent wheel spin only allow both wheels to spin

at the same rate. (can not be turned off)



1999-2001 1.8T

ASR. (anti slip regulator)

A traction control system that uses the ABS sensors on all

four wheels to determine if the front wheels are

spinning faster than the rear wheels. ASR will then use the

DBW (drive by wire) throttle to back off power

untill the front and rear wheels are accelerating at the same

rate. You can turn this off when wheel spin is desirable.



TurboS and all 2002-2005 Turbo models and 200?-2006 TDI models

ESP.(electronic stability program)

Combines all the features of EDL, ASR and ABS plus adds Yaw

sensors to determine if the vehicle is begining to

spin. In these cases it will use the DBW and ABS to bring the

vehicle back in line. It will touch a brake, back

off power or accelerate to control the spin.

It is still possible to spin out the vehicle but it raises the

limits in emergancy manuevers and loose and

slippery conditions.


When you turn off ESP you are turning off the ASR functions

and the ability for the vehicle to automatically

control a spin. This is desirerable in loose heavy gravel,

Deep snow, race tracks, and when trying to acheive

maxinum acceleration (such as in the 1/4 mile)




 

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Steinola said:
Good question. Since it's all software control of (primarily) already existing components... one would think that flashing the ECU with new firmware might do it. But I don't quite know enough about it to say for sure. It could be that there's a different master cylinder or harness that I'm not aware of. In addition, even if all you would need is newer firmware, there aren't many places that I know of that will reflash an ECU. That would just open them up to a whole slough of lawsuits and legal action if they don't do it exactly right. And shops just aren't willing to take the risk, as far as I've been able to tell. And then you'd definitely need to install the switch to turn the system off as needed.

How 'bout just upgrading the car? ;)
Well if you upgraded what would you do??? upgrade the ECU
 
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