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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
As to the oil residue; your boost was passing through the bad valve and so, that makes sense. Excess, motor oil, tends to build up in the piping and intercooler overtime. I removed my intercooler, lower hoses and cleaned them out, degreased, pressure tested it for leaks (mine was ok) and it seemed to help my boost performance a bit.
Replaced the diverter valve. No cigar. Gave me a bit more boost and sometimes delays the noise a bit but still there. Also took away my turbo flutter which makes sense but I miss that sound. Anyways. Any other guesses?
 

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It sounds like your DV was toast and the “flutter sound”, can actually end up damaging your turbocharger and so, that being gone, is a good thing!

Unresolved noise issue: A mechanics stethoscope or even a piece with of hose held up to your ear; can help isolate the particular noise, as you move around the engine compartment.

The above boost hose, that tends to split and make noise; is the hose, that connects to the diverter valve, you just replaced and the metal charge pipe, it runs behind the valve cover and along the back firewall.

1C0145712E

Pressure Line.
Part Number: 1C0145712E
Supersession(s): 1C0-145-712-E; 1C0145712D


Fits Beetle, Beetle Convertible

1.8 LITER, to cut-off valve.


Many assume, quickly looking at the hose; confirms it’s “ok” but removal and close inspection and possible pressure testing many times reals a split or leaks that might not be apparent at a quick glance.

Based upon your description, it maybe boost related and so, boost system and occ hoses should be checked.

You might benefit, from doing a pressure or smoke test; to reveals boost leaks and other potential failures in the engine boost, intake, evap, pcv subsystems.

You can make your own pressure tester with pcv plumbing parts from a hardware store, even something like a soup can, then spray with soapy water to find leaks or testing with smoke using, simple methods, shown on YouTube and other sites:



 

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Squeal may also just be the turbo drawing in air. Although if it is a violently loud screech , then it’s possible the turbo has seen its final days. , this sound could be the compressor wheel contacting the housing, the shaft in the turbo develops axial play( side to side) movement that ends in turbo failure.
 

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Alrighty. So, a few months ago I was driving home from work and decided to pass someone and all the sudden I hear a very loud high pitched squeal coming from my drivers side. Somewhere in the middle of the dash area coming from the engine. I literally thought there was a rat or something that was being squished by something somewhere in my engine. It only happens when I push the gas pedal hard and the rpm’s jump to about 3k. Once I hit about 3k, it continues and doesn’t stop until I let off of the gas. It happens at 3k ish rpm’s if I hit the gas pedal hard from a stop. But if I am normally driving and hit 3000rpm it doesn’t do it, it is pretty much just when I hit boost or when the engine has to push harder to move forward, such as up a hill. Now, it’s been a few months and still does it. I just replaced the brake booster vacuum hose today, which had a leak in it, but it still does it. When it does it, the car gains power right before it starts and then once it starts to squeal, the power isn’t necessarily lost but it just refuses to increase as much as it should. I’ve only had the car for about a year and a half and it’s been happening for the last maybe five or six months. Like I said, I have no clue what’s wrong with it. I took it to the vw specialists in my area and they said it was the brake booster, but I have a absolutely no trouble braking and there has been no change in the brake performance. I don’t experience any of the other symptoms of a bad brake booster either. The engine is completely stock. It sounds like it comes from around the brake booster area but I haven’t noticed any loose clamps, leaks (other than what I replaced today), or anything else. It only happens when I’m driving, if I am in park or neutral it will not do it.

general info about my car:
2001
AWV engine code
1.8t
GLX
73000 miles
Automatic

If anyone has any suggestions, I greatly appreciate it.

Video of the noise
The noise in that video seems to be coming from in the dash, from a faulty warning chime or the like.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
It sounds like your DV was toast and the “flutter sound”, can actually end up damaging your turbocharger and so, that being gone, is a good thing!

Unresolved noise issue: A mechanics stethoscope or even a piece with of hose held up to your ear; can help isolate the particular noise, as you move around the engine compartment.

The above boost hose, that tends to split and make noise; is the hose, that connects to the diverter valve, you just replaced and the metal charge pipe, it runs behind the valve cover and along the back firewall.

1C0145712E

Pressure Line.
Part Number: 1C0145712E
Supersession(s): 1C0-145-712-E; 1C0145712D


Fits Beetle, Beetle Convertible

1.8 LITER, to cut-off valve.


Many assume, quickly looking at the hose; confirms it’s “ok” but removal and close inspection and possible pressure testing many times reals a split or leaks that might not be apparent at a quick glance.

Based upon your description, it maybe boost related and so, boost system and occ hoses should be checked.

You might benefit, from doing a pressure or smoke test; to reveals boost leaks and other potential failures in the engine boost, intake, evap, pcv subsystems.

You can make your own pressure tester with pcv plumbing parts from a hardware store, even something like a soup can, then spray with soapy water to find leaks or testing with smoke using, simple methods, shown on YouTube and other sites:



I will definitely try to make my own pressure tester. Worst case scenario I take it to the VW specialist in my area and pay the $70 an hour for them to do it. But I will try making my own first and see if I can find it and fix it. I really hope to get this resolved soon. It has been such a pain to deal with.
 

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What are the codes associated with your check engine light being on?

I have had a similar noise with the 1.9 diesel. After replacing the turbo I did not get all the egr bolts tight and there are 2 places where there are small metal gaskets that if not tight will make noise like a reed in a musical instrument as the air is sucked across them by the turbo pressure.

I’m not sure a 1.8 has a similar set up or not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
What are the codes associated with your check engine light being on?

I have had a similar noise with the 1.9 diesel. After replacing the turbo I did not get all the egr bolts tight and there are 2 places where there are small metal gaskets that if not tight will make noise like a reed in a musical instrument as the air is sucked across them by the turbo pressure.

I’m not sure a 1.8 has a similar set up or not.
The only code that it is running right now is a lean code. and I will look into that, thank you
 

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There are a number of check valves; that are parts of the brake booster hose, the egr and turbo boost systems, you might remove each one and use a vacuum tester, to see if they hold vacuum one way, not the other. The many valves, tend to wear out or fail over time; my 1.8T has run better, as I slowly checked and/or replaced each one (diverter valve, hockey puck, jet pump, basic check valves, etc). Visual inspections are always good but as noted, making a pressure tester, using soapy water with a spray bottle, can reveal leaks, your odd "honking" noise, might rear its ugly head and/or smoke testing, can help as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
There are a number of check valves; that are parts of the brake booster hose, the egr and turbo boost systems, you might remove each one and use a vacuum tester, to see if they hold vacuum one way, not the other. The many valves, tend to wear out or fail over time; my 1.8T has run better, as I slowly checked and/or replaced each one (diverter valve, hockey puck, jet pump, basic check valves, etc). Visual inspections are always good but as noted, making a pressure tester, using soapy water with a spray bottle, can reveal leaks, your odd "honking" noise, might rear its ugly head and/or smoke testing, can help as well.
her alternator just died but once I replace it and get her back running I plan on doing more tests. If I am unable to find the source on my own I will go get her professionally smoke tested
 

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The small check valves are expensive from VW, see if you can get the VW part # off the old ones, then start searching and many places online, have them for less, fcpeuro has good quality oem parts with the lifetime warranty; then typically lesser quality stuff is on Amazon, eBay, can have them as well. Check the supplier/dealer ;as sometimes you can find known dealers selling parts on there or things can even be genuine VW parts, etc.


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The brake booster has a hard plastic line; is notorious for cracking and could cause you vacuum squealing noise.

They are kinda expensive and VW only; I have found rmeuropean, sells them for cheap for some reason and I ordered min from them, listed as oem but was genuine vw parts.

Volkswagen O.E.M. Brake Booster Vacuum Line with Check Valve 1C0612041AA



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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The brake booster has a hard plastic line; is notorious for cracking and could cause you vacuum squealing noise.

They are kinda expensive and VW only; I have found rmeuropean, sells them for cheap for some reason and I ordered min from them, listed as oem but was genuine vw parts.

Volkswagen O.E.M. Brake Booster Vacuum Line with Check Valve 1C0612041AA



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
This is exactly what I was thinking, I have no experience with it because I deleted all un necessary vac lines from my car immediately when I started building it as a drag car.
 

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Well, definitely worth checking; they crack all the time and typically, if you forget to remove it, when doing major repairs they crack easily, when old and brittle. This vacuum hose, is required; for the brake booster to work correctly and so, it is certainly worth checking, replacing if needed. If you find it is cracked; as a temporary fix, you can wrap the cracked portion with electrical tape and use a hose clamp to seal it, until you get the new one and swap it out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Well, definitely worth checking; they crack all the time and typically, if you forget to remove it, when doing major repairs they crack easily, when old and brittle. This vacuum hose, is required; for the brake booster to work correctly and so, it is certainly worth checking, replacing if needed. If you find it is cracked; as a temporary fix, you can wrap the cracked portion with electrical tape and use a hose clamp to seal it, until you get the new one and swap it out.
The hose you are referring to is one that I already replaced. Before I replaced it, I messed with it a bit trying to seal it as best as I could until I could order the part. I took it for a test drive and it worked for one solid pull until it, i guess, lost its seal. When I replaced it, it was worse than it was. The brake booster vacuum line on my beetle is a three-way hose, not sure why mine is different from most other 01 beetles. I went back in and tightened everything up again a few months after replacing it and that did not help either. I don't know if just got a faulty part or if the part that I ordered just wasn't quality enough to actually hold up. I find it weird that messing with it that one time worked for a hard pull but completely replacing the hose did not fix it and, if anything, made it worse. I don't want to go out and invest a bunch of money in another one of those hoses, but at the same time, it is completely possible that the one I ordered just wasn't quality enough and didn't hold up. It was some cheap eBay part so... I might try tightening up the clamps once more but after that ill just do a smoke test and if it's that hose, ill replace it

This is the hose that is on my beetle
Volkswagen New Beetle 1.8T Brake Booster Hoses - ECS Tuning
 

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I'm not clear, as to which one is on your vehicle; the genuine vw versions, aren't cheap but sometimes, places like rmeuropean, have better prices or aftermarket brands, like Vaico/Vemo, make a repro part that is less. At the shop, we have also; repaired ends that were not sealing by heating up the end with a hair drier or flame (propane torch, lighter) and then put it back on the fitting, that helped seal it on the barb, once again (like installing heat shrink tubing). In the case of the repair; the old hard plastic hose had split on the end (this is the typical failure mode); we used a hose cutter, to cut off the cracked portion of the hose and just, after heating, put it back on the barb and while not perfect, making the hose smaller, it saved the customer some money, rather then having to buy a whole new hose, which as you know, can get expensive.

I don't know, what brand hose you bought or who you bought it from but if from VW, they have a 1 year warranty on genuine vw parts.


This is another case, where FCPEURO; really shines with their lifetime warranty, they don't always carry the cheapest parts but they typically sell the good stuff, oe/oem and genuine vw parts, the warranty is great, especially for high failure parts.
 

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I'm not clear, as to which one is on your vehicle; the genuine vw versions, aren't cheap but sometimes, places like rmeuropean, have better prices or aftermarket brands, like Vaico/Vemo, make a repro part that is less. At the shop, we have also; repaired ends that were not sealing by heating up the end with a hair drier or flame (propane torch, lighter) and then put it back on the fitting, that helped seal it on the barb, once again (like installing heat shrink tubing). In the case of the repair; the old hard plastic hose had split on the end (this is the typical failure mode); we used a hose cutter, to cut off the cracked portion of the hose and just, after heating, put it back on the barb and while not perfect, making the hose smaller, it saved the customer some money, rather then having to buy a whole new hose, which as you know, can get expensive.

I don't know, what brand hose you bought or who you bought it from but if from VW, they have a 1 year warranty on genuine vw parts.


This is another case, where FCPEURO; really shines with their lifetime warranty, they don't always carry the cheapest parts but they typically sell the good stuff, oe/oem and genuine vw parts, the warranty is great, especially for high failure parts.
Yea FCP Euro is the way to go, I can attest to that, they have warranted motor mounts and fuel injectors for me. Both expensive items but they bit the bullet on them both , with a smile ,friendly as can be
 
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