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Discussion Starter #1
I park my car in front of the house so there's almost always a car passing by. I wanted double check that my car lights were off. So I opened my passenger's side door and put my hand on the passenger's seat, applying pressure so I could lean over to look at my dash. That's when it sounded like either the car door opened even wider or my front , right side tire went down.

Tire is currently, under a little hole so it's a little hard to tell whether it's flat or just looks that way because it's under a little hole on the curb. Because our curb is kind of crumbling apart along with our street next to that very curb. There's little hard rock-shape pieces where the curb is crumbling in that hole.

So dunno if I'll be able to tell until I start driving.





 

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Peace Love & T.o.D.
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Ok......I will be nice and ask if you know what a valve stem is?
Check the tire pressure with a gauge.
Inflate to recommended p.s.i. as stated on sidewall.
Keep a close eye on said tire and determine if a repair is in order.
 

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Wife's 01 1.8T mechanic
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The sidewall pressure is not the correct inflation pressure for your beetle. That is the MAX pressure for the tire. The correct pressure is found on your gas flap.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ok......I will be nice and ask if you know what a valve stem is?
Check the tire pressure with a gauge.
Inflate to recommended p.s.i. as stated on sidewall.
Keep a close eye on said tire and determine if a repair is in order.
Are they basically air caps? (Valve stems)

I don't have a gauge thing to check the tire pressure. But I could talk to my stepdad or my mother to see if they have one that I could use.

I will keep a close eye on said tire. Thanks.
 

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Peace Love & T.o.D.
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Get yourself a tire gauge. They only cost a couple bucks. Tire pressure is important to the life of the tire.
 

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Probably MIA
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Wow...

Sent from my DROID2
 

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Wanna Walnetto young lady
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It's sitting on the edge of the hole putting all the weight on the outside edge of the tire, making it look low. Move the car to a flat spot on the road and it should be fine. Do check your tire pressure at least once a month.:)
 

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Dubbed Spiderman
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Wouldn't that make a difference if someone had purchased different type tire? Lower profile? Just checking.
It totally would, Scott. :thup: I would never run my low profile 18's at the gas flap recommended pressure. :rolleyes: :D

Pumpkin-> Please get a pressure gauge and check your tires. Most important thing to check on your car next to oil and gas. ;)
 

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The sidewall pressure is not the correct inflation pressure for your beetle. That is the MAX pressure for the tire. The correct pressure is found on your gas flap.
Actually, turboturbo is correct. You are NOT suppose to inflate according to the tire. If you actually read the tire, it will say MAX PSI. That just means the maximum amount you should be inflating that tire. But the recommended PSI is on the sticker on the car in various locations.

Here are some videos.

Finding Correct Tire Pressure -- Mike Rowe Ford Service Video - YouTube
Proper vehicle tire pressure and inflation - YouTube

And a write up from TireRack.

Tire Tech Information - Checking Tire Inflation Pressure
 

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Wouldn't that make a difference if someone had purchased different type tire? Lower profile? Just checking.
No it does not. Just because you have a bigger or smaller wheel/tire doesn't change the amount of pressure required to inflate said tire. For example:

*** WARNING, Boring scientific content ***

When dealing with pressure (PSI) the amount is directly related to the volume of object being filled.

If you take a stock 16 wheel from a beetle, you would be using the follow tires: 205/55-16

If you decide to run 17's, you would probably be using the following tires: 215/45-17

Now lets say the recommended PSI on the car's label says 34 PSI.

Now the internal volume of those 2 tires are different. Meaning the amount of air you can put in those tires would be different. It would take more air volume for the 205/55-16 tire to reach 34 PSI versus the 215/45-17. But they would still be at 34 PSI.

On the flip side, if you were putting in the same volume of air in both tires you would end up with the 205/55-16 @ 34 PSI while the 215/45-17 would be over inflated, say 48 psi. This is because of the smaller internal volume of the 215/45-17 tire.

Simple test of this example would be 2 balloons. One large, one small. If you put enough air in the large balloon to have it completely inflated, and then put the same air volume into the small balloon, the small balloon would probably pop.
 

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OK, back on topic.

From the picture it does look low, but not completely flat. I don't see any reason not to at least drive it out of the hole to see it better.

You should pickup a tire gauge at your local auto store. They are super cheap (around $5). I have in the glove box of my cars even those they all have tire pressure sensors now.

Also, when you get your oil changes, you should go to places that will check tires as well. Most places do for free during the oil change.
 

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Dreamin' of a Bug !
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As everyone else mentioned a tire gauge is a good tool to carry around. I have one that I leave inside my car, and another inside the garage. Once you know what pressure your tires should be at, check it regularly. I check mine once a month & before a long trip.

Hopefully everything works out! Tire might just need a bit of air. :)
 

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Banned
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I'm pretty sure that's the variable looked at when discussing "pro comp tire". IE, not a donut.

Most base models are 16" , so they use 16" steels, no matter what options/packages you add to change wheel size.
 

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Yeah its yellow. So what?
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No it does not. Just because you have a bigger or smaller wheel/tire doesn't change the amount of pressure required to inflate said tire. For example:

*** WARNING, Boring scientific content ***

When dealing with pressure (PSI) the amount is directly related to the volume of object being filled.

If you take a stock 16 wheel from a beetle, you would be using the follow tires: 205/55-16

If you decide to run 17's, you would probably be using the following tires: 215/45-17

Now lets say the recommended PSI on the car's label says 34 PSI.

Now the internal volume of those 2 tires are different. Meaning the amount of air you can put in those tires would be different. It would take more air volume for the 205/55-16 tire to reach 34 PSI versus the 215/45-17. But they would still be at 34 PSI.

On the flip side, if you were putting in the same volume of air in both tires you would end up with the 205/55-16 @ 34 PSI while the 215/45-17 would be over inflated, say 48 psi. This is because of the smaller internal volume of the 215/45-17 tire.

Simple test of this example would be 2 balloons. One large, one small. If you put enough air in the large balloon to have it completely inflated, and then put the same air volume into the small balloon, the small balloon would probably pop.
I'm such a geek... I actually got excited when I saw the warning that there was scientic content... LOL
 

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Insert clever epithet
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Wow indeed.
Thirded.

To anyone who truly doesn't know: gas stations often have one. Ask to borrow theirs and top off your tires as needed. Then go buy your own tire gauge...they may even sell them at the gas station. Keep it in the glove box/armrest/bud vase.
 

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Go to an car part store, like Autozone, Trak & Auto, Pep Boys, or whatever car part store is in your part of the country. Buy a digital pressure gauge. It will cost about $6-$10 bucks. Much more expensive than the $2.00 analog gauges, but if you really have never used one, you will find the digital more user friendly. It will be money well spent. Check your tires about once a month. If that's too often once a quarter. Try to remind yourself whenever the seasons change. Or if you have a cell phone, use the calendar feature to set a reminder. Check the tires, the pressure should be within a pound or so of the recommended pressure, which is listed somewhere on the car. Maybe one of the door jambs, or under the hood. If your tires get low take it to a gas station that has an air pump and inflate them to the correct pressure. The air pump may cost about $1.00 worth of quarters. If you are lucky you'll find a station with free air. The $8.00 you spend on the gauge will pay for itself quickly with better gas mileage, longer lasting tires, and less chance for a flat or blowout. If you have questions come on the board and ask. It's OK not to know. It's not OK to go through life not knowing.

Man, I feel old right now.
 

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The most accurate way is to use a gauge to test. I know some old guys use a metal bar hit the side of the tire and listen to the echo but I don't know how to listen.
 
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