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Hi All,

I'm busy prepping my '99 for paint (currently sanding and filling). For those of you who have already painted your Beetles how much paint did you need to repaint the entire car? I'm looking at using the Duplicolor Paint Shop line series to repaint her, but I'm not sure exactly how much paint I need.

This paint already comes reduced out of the can, so I don't need to worry about mixing the paint before I lay it down, so I'm not exactly sure if I need more than a quart per stage.

Anyone use this paint line? How did it turn out and how much paint did you use?

Thanks!
 

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I used the spray cans of Duplicolor; when repairing my door panels, as the top cap was split. I found a good used one at the junk yard but it was dark gray, my body color is Reflex Silver. The paint match was pretty good and I used clear, to finish it off. I had quite a few problems; using the cans, having to re sand and respray, many times, as the paint had problems laying down well. After it dried, it still seems to be somewhat "sticky" and so, I am not convinced, this "auto paint" is really NOT professional grade. I'm assuming, in particular; the lack of a traditional hardener, maybe the reason and because, of the less expensive nature of it, the quality has to be reduced somehow. I went to my local auto body supply jobber and they were able to mix, put the right paint in a can for me, initially I thought Duplicolor would be a cheaper way to go. However, byy the time, I "redid" the paint spray coats, from the poor quality of the paint and re sanding, etc. so many times, because of the problems I had, it ended up costing what it would have been, if I went with professional auto body paint. I think, a pro auto paint; would have laid down better and easier; I wouldn't have had to redo things as much, working with a inferior product. That was my experience and the stickiness of the paint surface; when i rest my arm on the top of the door panel, is a constant reminder of my poor choice and is still annoying me, to this day! That was my experience; not good, in my opinion (I used to work at a body shop; in another life). As with anything, do your own research (maybe checke for reviews on youtube); you could do a "test" on a old panel or piece of metal; see, how it turns out for you.

So, whether the paint in the can and the paint in a spray can, are the same I don't know. However, I can see, if someone was doing a small touchup and it didn't have to be "handled" allot, like my door panel, it could be ok. What seems to be particularly annoying; is the lack of hardener or just that it is a inferior paint, to the pro grade stuff. Since, you are painting a WHOLE car; I wouldn't recommend it. The amount of time and effort; to prep the car correctly, could be ruined, by a poor quality paint, put on your good bodywork, only to not last or cure well, seeing how they omitted a hardener or it is just a sub par auto paint product.

As to the amount of paint needed; much depends, on how many coats you spray and if you use, a single or dual stage paint (e.g. just needs a one paint type or needs paint, plus a protective clear layer). A good local auto body paint/supply jobber; should be able to advise you, on what you need and their recommended amount, coats needed, etc. Many auto body shops or diy's at home; will try to skimp, on the coats, to save money and in the end, it just doesn't look right, as too little paint was laid down. Like anything, there is a learning curve; you may have to respray certain areas, color sand, remove drips, buff things out, etc. Making your own temporary spray booth; can help, keep the dust down and make your spray job better.

Another option; is to call around and see, if one of your local auto body shops, will rent out a booth, which could really increase, the quality of your spraying results. I would also, check with the cost of having them spray the car; as most of the cost of a paint job, is the prep and materials. Research all your options and see, what works best for you. If you did ALL the body prep yourself; you could end up with a affordable spray job, from a professional shop.

True professional auto body paint and supplies; have become very expensive, one of the reasons auto body work costs so much! However, if you go through all that prep time, blood/sweat/tears; is would be a real shame to use a inferior paint product and be heartbroken with bad results, not have it last or be very durable, long term.
 
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