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Discussion Starter #1
1.8T 2000 GLX - here's some recent history;

March 2013 - Drove to work and cylinder 1 completely died, I felt it die when I shifted from fourth to fifth going up a not too steep hill, was not firing at all. Bought a new Ignition Coil for 25$, slapped it in, car ran perfect. I also replaced all four spark plugs later that day since they were due for a changing.

Two weeks later on the way to work, same thing, up another hill in fifth cylinder 1 stops firing again. I moved the Ignition Coil from cylinder 4 to cylinder 1 and vice versa - lo and behold the code the car throws now is cylinder 4 misfiring. Went back to PepBoys and they gave me a replacement which I put into cylinder 4 and car ran great. (Cylinder 1 still working like a champ with the OE Igintion Coil that used to be in Cyl4.)

So I just assumed that the Coil that the store had sold me was wonky as the 2nd replacement worked for a few weeks.

Over the course of those few weeks I did the timing belt/water pump with my friend (thanks to D2Beetle for that awesome DIY, was a hell of a job but that belt is on there perfectly. :D) and that was pretty much all the work done on the car.

Driving home one night last week on the highway in 5th gear at around 60 MPH the car suddenly shudders and loses a bit of speed, same feeling as when my coil originally died but no CEL or anything and the car is still running fine. After I get off the highway the car feels fine although it's just lacking power in the top end. Got another new coil, everything back to perfection.

That coil worked good for a few days until I noticed that in fifth it would start to lack power up hills. Replaced that coil with another and it's running fine again.

So after all of that and a few wasted Ignition Coils later, it sounds like there might be some faulty wiring somewhere?
Not sure what else would be causing repeated failures like this?

What doesn't make sense to me is why is cylinder one fine and dandy right now when it's the one that originally failed and the recurring failures are only with these replacement coils?

Any ideas anyone? I'd like to get this settled as the car is mechanically very good but it's getting unreliable when it's trying to make me drive it on three cylinders. >_<
 

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I would recommend that you get the coils from your Volkswagen dealer; they aren't that expensive, they have the latest design revision as well. You also might call your dealer's service dept. with your vin # and see if the latest recall has been done on the coils, you might get them replaced for free. I had mine done; the latest version, seems to be superior and I haven't had any failures yet. I have had numerous coils replaced over the years and the earlier revisions seemed to be particularly failure prone. I would question the quality of some aftermarket parts sold through your typical auto parts store, like pep boys.

Another possiblity; many have noted on the 1.8T, the wiring near the coil pack connectors get cracked from the heat from the engine. The audi's had a covering over the wiring that protected them and insulated the wiring loom from the heat. Some threads I have read; relate that the wiring and connectors being faulty, actually contributing to the coil pack failures. There is a kit from VW that comes with everything you need; to replace all the wiring. You might check with your dealer's parts dept. to make sure this is the right one for your particular engine code.

I would start with getting all the coil packs to the latest revision (hopefully for free under warranty) and then see if you still have the misfire issues.


You might check with your dealer's parts dept. to make sure this is the right one for your particular engine code.*

1.8T COIL PACK WIRING HARNESS REPLACEMENT
VW part #: 1J0971658L


(there are other places that sell if for cheaper: 1stvwparts.com)

Home Page > Search > 1J0 971 658 L > ES#2506749 Coil Pack Wiring Harness Replacement - 1J0971658L

Here is a diy that gives you an idea what it takes to do the swap:

MKIV Ignition Coil Wiring Harness Replacement ---- DIY
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks billymade, it does look like my ignition coil harness is due for a replacement as I replaced the connectors for cylinders one and two with the following repair kit:
Ignition Coil Connector Repair Kit / Ignition Coils - On Sale at CPD!

Running very nice at the moment, hopefully it did the trick (for now at least) and I'll definitely plan on doing a full harness replacement in the future.
 

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So, what ended up solving your problem? Did you replace more coil packs (recall?) or did replacing the coil pack wiring/connectors do the trick? It sounds like you aren't having any more misfire codes!? Those repair kits are kinda spendy; a little more and you could have gotten the whole harness repair assembly! :mad: It is interesting; I find from time to time, that aftermarket parts and repair kits are more expensive then genuine vw parts... which seems to be against the conventional wisdom when it comes to working and repairing vw's. Always check your dealer; you never know!
As I said before; my latest revision coil packs have been doing great and so far, I haven't seen any cracks in my wring harness but seeing how many years it has been and the heat getting to the plastic housing... a replacement harness seems like a smart and eventually needed repair in the future. I think the audi insulation covering that came on those cars; would be a smart upgrade to make the new harness last.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I checked my VIN# with VW and my beetle never had a recall for the Ignition Coils so I pretty much went at it on my own with replacing the Cylinder 1 and 4 connectors (spliced them into the old harness as best I could) and put two new Ignition Coils in those cylinders as well.

It's been almost three weeks and the coils are still working.

So for anyone that ever has an Ignition Coil die out on them it's a good idea to splice in a new connection plug if the old one is super aged.. or replace the entire Ignition Coil Harness if you're up for that big a job.
 

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Glad to hear things are going well for you; what brand of coil packs did you buy to replace the old ones? I think most if not all of mine from the dealer; were made by Bremi. Many people swear that the Hitachi coil packs are better and less failure prone.



Here are some examples of different coil pack options from ECS Tuning:

Home Page > ECS News > MKIV 1.8T Coil Pack Options

Keep us posted if things change and you end up doing the wiring harness replacement; looks more time consuming them difficult. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Currently running three OEM Hitachi and the replacement one is a Bremi - the Hitachi and Bremi ones look very similar and perform the same as far as I can tell. It's the made in china ones that local auto parts mostly stock that seem to suck..
 

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Hi Guys,

don't mean to hijack this thread, but I'm just about to replace the plugs. Thought I'd do the coils too and now having read through here, probably the harnesses as well. My question is, do you need a puller to get the old coils off? I understand if they are being replaced I don't need to worry about damage, but I'm thinking for servicing later on. Would it be worth investing in the puller they sell at GermanAutoParts?

http://newbeetle.org/forums/newreply.php?do=newreply&noquote=1&p=844440

Thanks!
 

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As the old saying goes; a repair job, always goes better if you have... "the right tool for the job". One of the major suppliers for Bremi; stresses the need for the tool and even says they will not honor the warranty, if any marks are on the coils from prying them out. I personally; have never used the tool and haven't had any problems. I have been able to pull them out of the valve cover by hand or carefully with a small pry bar or screwdriver or needle nose pliers as a lever to pop them up, out of the hole. Now, did I do it correctly, NO but I was careful and didn't seem to have any negative affects from doing so. If your willing to spend the money; I would say buy the tool and have peace of mind you are doing the job "right". :) Some people have also used a home made "tool"; wrapping spare wire around them or using zip ties as as way to grip and pull them out.

Here is a quote from the USA Bremi distributor:

Direct Ignition Coils are easily damaged when they are removed with an improper tool during routine tune-up or
repair. The inside of the coils get damaged when they are pried off. The removal force must be evenly distributed.
VW/Audi requires that specially designed tools be utilized in order to safely remove the coils, to prevent internal and
external damage. We have seen numerous coils that have been returned “claimed defective” that are broken, cracked or have scratch marks on them from using an improper screw driver or plier type tool to remove them.Please Note: Coils returned with scratch marks or physical housing damage from using improper tools, will not qualify for warranty.


SO, after reading that; it makes me wonder if I have been damaging my coils when I take them out? Maybe so, maybe not?!

Look at the end of the catalog to see the tool set they sell; it can be found online.

http://www.karlynsti.com/2012 Direct Ignition Catalog.pdf

Link to a pic and info;

Karlyn's New Items

Looks to be your typical asian offshore tool kit; sold by many different brand names.

http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_trk...w=vw+audi+coil+pack+puller&_sacat=0&_from=R40

https://www.google.com/search?q=vw+...608,d.aWc&fp=746bd702df9010f1&biw=853&bih=624

ECS Tuning propaganda; showing the tool in use! :)

http://www.ecstuning.com/Volkswagen...gnition_Coil_Pack_Remover_ES#240944/ES240944/

Here is a cool thread; with some ideas, for protecting your coil pack wiring harness; Audi and VW for the Mark V Golf, made attempts to shield the wiring from heat. Obviously, it became a issue; they tried to do something about it! :) While your in there; you might do something about it! :)

http://forums.vwvortex.com/showthre...Coil-Pack-Replacement-Repair-and-Heat-Shields
 

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Thanks for all that info billymade. I think I'll invest in the puller. It's still cheaper than having the workshop do the job for me. Thanks again!
 

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Bremi was the supplier for VW, Audi, and BMW. They all have TSB's on it by replacing all coils. Just replaced 8 on my BMW and was having similar issues. One would go out, moved it to another location, same... still would come back with a misfire.

IF what I read on the internet is true, the coils have 2 phases. Many times the second phase, WOT, fails and can not be bench tested.

Wait, there is a tool to replace the coils? Oh come on. That's Bremi CYA'ing themselves. Seriously, 3 car makers, all the same issues.

The wire harness replacement is a good idea as well. I would start there first, then replace all coils. Ohm resistance is what I gather between new and old.
 

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nyum96, expound on the BMW coil issues; on my 1.8T (I have had it since new), there have been a number of revisions; it only seems until this last one... that they seem to have become more reliable. I think; that fact that they are stuck inside the head/valve cover and all that heat that is generated (with no where to go)... is just asking for trouble and deterioration, failure. I don't know; how they are supposed to remain cool and there doesn't seem to be any attempt to circulate air or draw the heat away from the coils (heat sink, etc.). I'm no engineer but it seems, the design itself is just such that heat has to be a major problem. When I had problems with the first set of coils that came with my car; some literally fell apart when I took them out; the heat really seemed to have gotten to them.
As I mentioned; that last revision, done at my local dealer... really seem to be better; maybe they have finally improved them enough to be reliable! I hope so; I am sick and tired of replacing them so often.
 

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I have BMW's as well, never had coil issues yet, but read on the forums and there are a lot of coil related issues. Likely cracking, bad solder joints and internal wiring issues where the enamel wire insulation may break down to to vibration and heat would be my guess.

I have a 2003 BMW M5 and a 2006 330cic and so far have not had issues. I think most of the problems were 2003 and earlier, but there would still be issues after 2003 as well?
 

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nyum96, expound on the BMW coil issues

Bosch has a replacement for the V8 models (What I am familiar with) It is square than circular (Bremi) and can be replaced in singles. The round Bremi's, they suggest to replace in sets. My coils had the manufacture date stamped on top and was in that year range of them being junk. When I diagnosed the misfire to the cylinder, switch the coils around and the issue followed to that cylinder. Easy fix, until the new one was installed and 4 more cylinders had a misfire, All at WOT. I read it had to with the old vs. new ohm values. I bench tested them and all were fine. BMW says to replace all it they are Bremi and single with Bosch. To throw a twist in that saga, everything was fine until I replaced the spark plugs, then the misfires.

With the VW, my engine code is APH. Not a lot of trouble but have had a coil go out once or twice. Since the coils are cheap, you only have to replace 4 and not 8, better piece of mind and you have spares to keep in the car.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
It's been almost a year since my original issues with Ignition Coils popped up and thankfully everything is still working perfectly!

Basically, due to the age of the vehicle (2000), simple replacement of the coil packs wasn't enough as the connectors and wiring that sits on top of the engine behind the coil packs takes a beating after so long. Even after using cheaper local auto parts store coil packs, they run great as long as the connectors and wiring are re-done to ensure the coil pack is getting proper power and signal.

I wrapped mine in corrugated tubing to help prolong the wire life as long as possible as replacing the entire harness is ridiculously expensive and time consuming when the connectors fix is all it takes.

Hope this helps anyone else in the future if your NB starts killing coil packs and misfires on a random cylinder or two!
 

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Cool! Glad things are working out for you; another option is the Audi/VWs 2.0 TSI coil wiring harness protector (its not expensive and apparently works well):

red version:

Coil Pack wiring harness conduit: Part # 8E0-971-824-S

https://www.google.com/search?q=1.8...7.4926j0j4&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=119&ie=UTF-8

black version:

https://www.google.com/search?q=06F...ome..69i57&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=119&ie=UTF-8

Coil Pack wiring harness conduit: Part # 06F971824C

The wiring harness replacement; I think actually is a pretty affordable part but looks to be time consuming to replace! I need a new coil plug/connector and just one, is almost half the price of a whole new harness!

https://www.google.com/search?q=VW+...ome..69i57&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=119&ie=UTF-8
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Those harness protectors look really nice, going to add 'em to my list of fancy extras to get once I'm done fixing all the vitals in my engine bay.
 
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