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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Picked up a lower mileage 2.0 AEG during one of the 50 percent off sales last year at LKQ. Just wondering if I have everything covered as far as a maintenance checklist before it gets swapped in. I will be doing a new valve cover gasket, intake gasket, exhaust gaskets, oil filter gasket, plugs, and wires. If anyone can make any recommendations as to what else would be wise to replace while everything is easily accessible, I would love to hear it. The timing belt job looks like it had been done recently before entering its final resting place, however it appears to me that it is off a tooth. I'm attaching a picture to see if everyone agrees. The marks on the crank pulley are perfectly lined at the bottom. I will be checking to see if the water pump was replaced with one that has metal impellers.
 

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I'd leave nothing to chance concerning the timing belt. If you dont have sho nuff proof that the timing belt is new, I'd go all in, do it right and put a new timing belt/tensioner/roller/water pump in now, especially that the engine is not in the bug. It would be a shame to forfeit the joy of your excellent engine buy, only to have the belt fail, and pay for a top end rebuild.

Keep us posted on the install and you beetle's progress.

All the best.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337 using Tapatalk
 

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Look to these guys; for a timing belt/waterpump kit: Audi Parts - Vw Parts - Audi Parts Vw Parts Kit Company - Blauparts®

It couldn't hurt; to do a compression test and oil pressure test; BEFORE installation. That way; if there is any issues, you can resolve them before installation. In this case; a leak down test, may be easier to perform with the correct tool. Good video; showing this testing procedure:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WgrfT0LFMhc&nohtml5=False

Pulling the oil pan and checking the oil pump screen for debris/clogging and bottom end caps/rods for wear; couldn't hurt either. Also, a new rear main seal; would be easy to do as well; as would a new clutch. Used engines; can be a great affordable solution to a bad engine but they are also a gamble. Be sure to double check the condition of everything before installation; eliminate, any surprises by fully evaluating the condition of the engine before dropping it in. At that point; make any necessary repairs and you can be fully confident with the engine in the car and hopefully, it will last for a long time. I don't know; how many times, I have been involved in used engine swaps and there ended up being something wrong with the engine and it had to come out after installation; it is a huge drag and no fun! How about eliminate that situation; double check everything, before install. Good luck and let us know; how it goes! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well after accumulating some parts I finally got around to getting the motor/transmission installed. Put in new valve cover gasket, exhaust and intake gaskets, oil filter housing gasket, plugs, wires, timing belt and waterpump. Also new LUK clutch and flywheel, release bearing and fork. Probably some other stuff I'm forgetting. I only put on what I had to for the initial startup. The lifters had a little bit of noise at first but it sounds nice and is pretty quiet. About the only problem I had was as soon as my foot touched the clutch pedal, it fell to the floor. The only thing I can think of for that is when I took the slave cylinder out, the rubber boot end pulled back and that may have allowed air in. I made sure the clutch pedal wasnt touched while the slave was out.
 

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Good job; it sounds like you took the time, to do it right and replace the parts that were worn out. Always good to replace; hard to get to parts with the engine out.

For the pedal falling to the floor issue; you should try bleeding the system. When I did my clutch swap; the pedal going to the floor (not coming back up), was defintiely, when I did NOT have the system fully bled (new slave cylinder with the fluid drained out; when replacing the parts). I used the Phoenix Systems reverse bleeder kit and it made the bleeding job a snap, no need for someone to pump the clutch for you. This tool; works particularly well for hard to bleed clutch systems and you can do it by yourself:

https://www.google.com/search?q=pho...rome..69i57.9452j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8
 
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