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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
03 NB 1.8T, Well I finally got the guts up and started on replacing my timing belt. I've got no history on the belt that's in the 200k car. Could it be original? It doesn't look cracked or missing any teeth. Gonna do the belt, water pump and the tensioners.

I have the fuel lines off, the intercooler lines disconnected, haven't taken the engine supports off yet. My book says to remove the spark plugs and rotate the engine by hand to get #1 at TDC, compression stroke. Man, removing the plugs (which SHOULD probably get changed) looks like a real pita! haven't taken off the crank pulley yet. Can the engine be rotated from a wrench on the crank with the plugs left in?

I marked the cam sprocket notch and the crank pulley notch with paint. I've been bumping the belt around with the starter, but doubt I'll ever get them to stop in JUST the right spot. The MAIN idea is to make sure both sprockets don't move right? As long as the sprockets don't move, does it really matter if I'm at TDC #1? I was thinking if I could make two simple (removable) brackets to keep each sprocket from turning. Put brackets on, remove belt (with brackets in place), install new belt, activate tensioner, then remove brackets. Sprockets couldn't move.

Also, the rear, big hose from the intercooler is soaked with oil (I wasn't sure what ran through those big hoses). The connection that has the spring clip retention thing seems kinda loose and sloppy- like it's supposed to tighter and more sealed. Wonder if that big diameter rubber hose should be replaced, or somehow sealed up better. Seems like anywhere this engine could be leaking oil, it is leaking oil. I don't have it in me to tackle every oil leak.

Thanks in advance! Dave
 

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You don't have to remove the spark plugs (it is easier to turn; when removed but not necessary); I leave them in and just use the crank to turn things. I would get the timing marks @ #1; if you are worried about getting everything right, you could mark your old timing belt and the pulleys. This has a way of making proof positive; you put everything back, the way it came. You can then; count the teeth on the new belt and mark them just like the old one, then install the new one, line up the mark on the teeth and pulleys.

Here is the service manual; to show you areas, to line up the #1 cylinder marks, (crank, cam and flywheel).

Volkswagen Workshop Manuals > New Beetle L4-1.8L Turbo (AWP) (2003) > Maintenance > Timing Belt > Component Information > Service and Repair > Procedures

As for oil leaks on the 1.8T; the most common leaking area is the valve cover gasket and the oil filter housing/bracket. Replacing those; at this pont, would probably be a good idea and most likely fix many of your oil leaks.
 

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You should be able to carefully turn the engine over slowly using the bolt on the camshaft. This is easier to access than the crank bolt and you can turn the engine in the proper direction in small amounts without much problem.

Just do not turn the engine backwards using the camshaft bolt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
timing

After I wrote all of that I went out and just put a big (23mm I think) socket on the crank bolt and gently goosed it around clockwise. Seems that both marks are now on the top- TDC on #1 cylinder! I thought trying to turn it with the plugs in would be quite difficult, but it was fine.

I'm nervous about this repair so I'm going slow and carefully- right from my repair manual. But except for breaking one of those plastic T things on one of the fuel lines (#[email protected]*^!&) it's going pretty well. I need to get some fuel injection style hose clamps. Nice gnarly gash on the back of my left hand...

Valve cover gasket- that sounds pretty simple. Maybe after this T belt I'll give that a go. Dave
 
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