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Discussion Starter #1
I've been looking around at a TDI and kind of stumbled onto a statement on VWVortex that implied VW will no longer make the TDI after 06 (for US consumption) because some kind of a diesel fuel change. What is changing and what does that mean for all of you with a diesel and for that matter, anyone with a diesel? Are you still going to be able to get fuel for your cars?

I also understand that VW may be switching over to the CDI (common rail diesel) and may bring a diesel back to the US after 06/07. Does anyone know what is going on?

I'm very seriously considering a Jetta TDI or a Beetle TDI but I don't want to invest in something I won't be able to drive in a year.
 

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CRAZ4VW
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VW will definitely still be importing TDIs to the U.S. However, there will likely be a model year gap for 2007 where there are no TDIs imported. There are several reasons, the ULSD (ultra-low sulfur diesel) being a part, as well as ever-tightening emissions requirements and the fact that VW is retiring the PD technology that's used in all the TDIs currently available in the U.S. From what I can gather from info over at tdiclub.com, it's likely that come 2008 VW will be importing their new generation of TDI with common rail injection technology and it will be 50-state legal.
 

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a sneak preview

If you want to see what VWAG are doing with the common rail injection diesel, have a look at this page. And, especially, watch the video.

That's what we'll get in 2008. (Well, maybe a bit smaller than the 650hp model.) Oh yeah!
 

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I'm a bit disappointed in the Audi videos; I wanted to see more of the car on track and less talk and stastitical information overlay, but it sounds and looks like a mean machine.

I've also heard from the dealers that we won't see an 07 model, nor will Mercedes make an 07 diesel, in order for all german diesel makers to transition in Common-Rail technology and to wait-out the US low-sulfur diesel initiative that the EPA has started.

On the bright side: this is great news for those of us who want old diesels; as the regulations change those of us who want to make greasecars or biodiesels will have lots of options!
 

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Above average
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Yeah - I agree !! No sound no more details of the car...rats

Ok let ma add my 2 cent. The latets version of CRD enigines is called BLUETEC by Mercedes. Dont know how this works but Mercedes (Daimler-Chrysler)assert they could underbid the current polution norm for Diesel cars...We'll see
 

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Nashman28 said:
Yeah - I agree !! No sound no more details of the car...rats
I got some really sweet sound (engine and music). Check your player!
 

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Yup the TDIs don't meet EPA regulations. Be careful what you wish for as you might just receive it.............
 

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New MAF and glow plug harness

I installed a new MAF. It is very easy to do. I had no idea this car was supposed to rev up :). What a difference. I guess it slowly went bad. I did notice a sluggishness at top end and "oilhammer" suggested I change it out when he did my TB changeout. Good call oilhammer.

Glow plug harness: I removed the old one and found out why they chnaged over to a solid plastic cover compared with the "slotted" stock housing. Right where one of the slots is there was a big crack in the plastic and it exposed the inner wire. This won't happen with the new one. Is this the REAL cause of the glow plug "intermittent" warning? Putting this on is a little more tricky as you have to cut the wiring and splice in a female end blade-type electrical connector and cover it with heat shrink wrap. Still, it's an easy job when it comes down to it.
 

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CRAZ4VW
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Mercedes-Benz will have a 2007 E320 CDI featuring the new 3.2l CRD V6 with BLUETEC technology. It will be 50-state legal. I work for DaimlerChrysler and they state that they're committed to offer BLUETEC engines in Mercedes, Jeep and Dodge starting in 2007.
 

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What The FudgeCake?
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What does all this mean for current diesel owners? Will we still be able to get fuel? I mean WTF. So many people would have to sell their car, and quite frankly im thinking about buying a TDI soon. I dont want to buy it, be a year, and then have to get rid of it because i cant fill it up at all.

Someone let me know ASAP...that soon may be like...today...


*Cant believe i couldnt spell the difference of their and there...dork moment thanks!*
 

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Whitacre said:
What does all this mean for current diesel owners? Will we still be able to get fuel? I mean WTF. So many people would have to sell there car, and quite frankly im thinking about buying a TDI soon. I dont want to buy it, be a year, and then have to get rid of it because i cant fill it up at all.

Someone let me know ASAP...that soon may be like...today...
Yes, and no problems. We went through the change over at the beginning of 2005, and the world has not ended. Price of diesel went up 10c a litre though. :( We now get so many diesel cars (Audi, VW, Peugeot, Citroen, Holden (=GM), BMW, Mercedes, etc) because finally our fuel is as good as the stuff Europe has had for a few years. To give you an idea, VW Australia now sell nearly 50% of all Golfs with the 2.0 TDI engine, which makes it the most popular engine choice for the most popular VW model in Australia. The Jetta is coming with a TDI as well, but that's a niche model which will sell maybe 200 a year (sedans aren't popular for some reason), so it doesn't count. The New Beetle has two engine choices: a 1.6 petrol and the only reasonable engine is the old 1.9 TDI.

The new engines which can't cope with crappy fuel, which is why the makers will probably wait a bit to introduce them to ensure that all the old fuel is gone by the time their cars come on stream. The old engines will cope no problems with the new, cleaner fuel - diesels are quite tolerant of better / different fuels (think biodiesel for example). The new 2.0 TDI with 110 kW / 320 Nm is just an awesome engine - I've test driven it several times in a Comfortline Golf, making me wish my jihad against VW was over.

However, the new engines require <150 ppm sulfur fuel or else its emission equipment will just block up. The old engines don't care that the new fuel is 50 - 150 ppm sulfur and will continue to work.

Andrew
 

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Diesel Inside
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We don't have ULSD everywhere yet. I think it was supposed to September this year that you will see it widespread. It's sometime at the end of this year I thought when they HAD to have it. It is nice though that with the ULSD we should start seeing more models come to the US with diesel options. Honda Accord diesel anyone?
 

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DR.billZ said:
HOnda Accord diesel? No thanks.
Is it the Accord that worries you, or the diesel?

Check this out - sounds like a decent engine to me.

The Accord the rest of the world gets is known in the US as a Acura TSX, but as Honda Accord Euro everywhere else. There is a another Honda Accord as well, but it's ugly and crap.

thanks,
Andrew
 

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jpdeuce said:
We don't have ULSD everywhere yet. I think it was supposed to September this year that you will see it widespread. It's sometime at the end of this year I thought when they HAD to have it. It is nice though that with the ULSD we should start seeing more models come to the US with diesel options.
Business is looking good lately for oil refiners, and unfortunately that includes having more time to switch to ULSD. We may not see ULSD as a nationwide federal minimum until 2010. Last time I read, refiners will blend the ULSD with the crappy stuff for a few years. Anything can happen, but it's 2006 already and we've yet to see the good news on cleaner diesel for the US.
:(
 

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Whitacre said:
What does all this mean for current diesel owners? Will we still be able to get fuel?
Come up for some air. Breathe calmly. Uh, you see all those 18 wheelers out there? What fuel do they use? No, diesel fuel isn't going anywhere. Locomotives use it, farm equipment, etc, etc, etc. Time to see the reality that abounds around you.
 

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Yes, we will not lack diesel. I consider diesel fuel more useful than gasoline by far: trucks, locomotives, boats and ships, construction machinery, power generators, military tanks, you name it. But...

if there is a mismatch as there is now between the emission limits for small passenger vehicles, and the quality standards for diesel fuel, then we won't see small passenger cars for sale with diesel engines in them. As of now, only Volkswagens and one model from Mercedes and the Jeep Liberty are available with a diesel engine in them in the US. it really is hard to believe that you can't get anything else, but you can't! (except for supersize pickups)
 

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DR.billZ said:
Come up for some air. Breathe calmly. Uh, you see all those 18 wheelers out there? What fuel do they use? No, diesel fuel isn't going anywhere. Locomotives use it, farm equipment, etc, etc, etc. Time to see the reality that abounds around you.
Very true! and lets not forget 'Jet A' which is a similar type of fuel. Hey... Wonder how my TDI would run on that? :)
 

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Timeline said:
Very true! and lets not forget 'Jet A' which is a similar type of fuel. Hey... Wonder how my TDI would run on that? :)
Not very well. This has been discussed to death at tdiclub.com. You'd have to blend something with it to increase lubricity to the level needed by a diesel engine. Biodiesel might work. It could go, but I wouldn't bet my PD on it. Try it in your 1984 Rabbit.

But your point is well-taken. No. 2 Diesel, Jet A and home heating oil are all in more or less the same class of heavy distillates. And when gasoline engines are less prevalent, the heavy oils that were broken down to produce gas can be used instead to produce diesel, with less energy invested in the cracking process, so more efficiency.
 
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