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2000 new beetle broke down. Over heating issue. Milky oil on dipstick. Time for new head gasket. so I remove the valve cover, to my surprise the oil deflector under the valve cover was completely melted. I don't know how long it's been like that but it has been burning oil like crazy. I've managed to get all the plastic pieces out and cleaned it all up. my question is this. I'm not sure what caused the deflector to melt like that. did the engine overheat causing the deflector to melt and block oil passages which got it super hot and blew the head gasket. has anyone experienced this before. did the oil pump suffer if the oil passages were blocked by melted plastic. not really sure where to go from here. any advice would be much appreciated.
 

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Well, first time I have heard of that plastic deflector melt in the head; we have seen, the windage tray, in the oil pan do this, however. I can only assume, that at some point; the engine, got hot enough to melt, this part (maybe the head is warped; that is why the head gasket is leaking?). Compression/leak down or combustion leak test; may, confirm the head gasket issue. When tearing the engine down, I would be checking everything and confirm, the internals are ok. With the oil, being compromised; I would pull the oil pan, confirm, the bottom end/bearings are ok. I would have the head taken to a machine shop; have it pressure tested, checked for cracks, cam caps for wear, etc. etc. Worst case scenario, a engine rebuild; might be in order.

Do you know, anything, about the history of the car? We are seeing, more, more people; buy sub $1k new beetle "fixer upper" type cars and some need a lot of work and that is why, they are being sold for so little, these days.
 

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I know next to nothing of the history of this vehicle. I put a straight edge on the mating surfaces of the head and block. I was unable to slide .002 feeler gauge under the straight edge on the block and I was unable to slide .003 feeler gauge under straight edge on the head. where i see the head gasket failed. between the number one and two cylinder. I really can't afford to take the head to a machine shop. An old timer suggested I get some 80 grit and a flat piece of plexi glass and level out the head that extra .001. ima replace the valves, guides, seals, springs etc. since ive got it out anyways. the only issue I have is do you think the liquid plastic from the melted deflector got into the oil passages to the head. And if so is the head shot? could that have stressed out the oil pump? I know it's only a vw beetle and putting all this effort and time into this vehicle, to some would be a waste of time and money. but it's my girls car and she loves it. thanks again for your advice.
 

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Well, all of these issues, are possibilities; because, the engine is already disassembled, much of the testing, like oil pressure and compression, are not possible.

We, have had some successes lately with people doing head rebuilds/head gasket replacements but we have had some failures. Much, depends on checking everything; before, just assuming, things are ok and putting it back together. While, cost is always a factor; in the long run, have a head fully tested for cracks, warp, straightness, etc. and shaved to spec, making sure everything is, as it should be, actually can save you money. We had lately, two failures and in those cases, the owners, went ahead and didn't have the heads checked out, they regretted it later, when they had problems with leaks and low compression.

So, saving "money", is questionable; if you have to "redo" a head job. Keeping in mind, you will need all new head gaskets and new bolts, which are stretch bolts and have to be replaced, everytime, they are torqued, to spec.

Everything should be checked out, including the bottom end, oil pump/pickup tube/screen, bearings/crank aren't scored, etc. As for oil galleys being clogged; that is possible, as well and should be checked. If you keep the engine in the car, there is only, so much you can do or the traditional methods, with the engine, fully removed on a engine stand and thoroughly cleaned, etc. Oil galleys, can be cleaned out with special engine brushes and blown out with compressed air. You won't know, how things work out; until you have everything back together, fill it with oil, you start the engine and see, what the oil pressure is with a oil pressure test gauge.

As you can see, there are alot of "open" questions; you can do the best you can with the engine in place or remove, the engine and do a rebuild, in a more detailed way, have everything checked out, following the vw factory service manual.

With anything, it comes down to your time vs. money; what you want to "spend" and how long, you want the car/engine to last, the risks, you are willing to take. I can't tell you, what your engine's condition is; you won't know, until you check it out and your success, depends on your ability, attention to detail and following correct testing methods and having professionals (like a machine shop) help/do things for you, when needed. You could cut corners and it work out or you could fail, have the engine get damaged and not workout, in the long run. Because, of the fact, the engine, was obviously overheated badly and the history of the car is unknown, I would err on the side of caution, check everything out correctly, rather then, assuming, everything is ok and just run with it. The decision, is up to you and how much time, effort, money, you are willing, to put into your project.
 

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thanks for the manual. I agree with you totally. it's convincing her whats better in the long run. I'll keep updated or if any issue come up. thanks again
 

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how the heck do I remove the brake line plastic quick connect. I'm so frustrated now. why they make an so difficult please any advice appreciated.
 

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2000 new beetle broke down. Over heating issue. Milky oil on dipstick. Time for new head gasket. so I remove the valve cover, to my surprise the oil deflector under the valve cover was completely melted. I don't know how long it's been like that but it has been burning oil like crazy. I've managed to get all the plastic pieces out and cleaned it all up. my question is this. I'm not sure what caused the deflector to melt like that. did the engine overheat causing the deflector to melt and block oil passages which got it super hot and blew the head gasket. has anyone experienced this before. did the oil pump suffer if the oil passages were blocked by melted plastic. not really sure where to go from here. any advice would be much appreciated.
Well I didn't know they had plastics inside the head !, had a bugger of a time digging out the head bolts everything was melted, now all the valves are stuck open not one appears have touched the piston's, although valves are still in the head. I think the sump is the next off, ;) bought it cheap,( he said it has an oil leak, so can't start it.) if he could of started it, I would have given him a $1000-00 knowing what i have found today, it wouldn't of gone with ether, so your not the only one to find melted plastic, I took the timing plug out of the bellhousing to set it on TDC no1, to find the timing was way out, when I got the head off and checked the belt tensioner bolt was tight it was in the relaxed slack position so it had never been tensioned correctly, hence the jumped timing.

So with that said just pull it apart and blow every oil passage, oil pump, big ends, mains and start again,
its a long time since I have worked on a VW, I must admit the tech which has gone into these new ones , ! All be it 21 years old it is quite refreshing. once you get all the crap off it just like the first polo I changed the head gasket on 50 years ago.
now I need more bit than I expected :)
 

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If the engine was overheated, melted the plastic cover, i would have the head checked out by a machine shop, rebuilt or exchanged. At the bare minimum; it will need to be shaved to fix warped mating surfaces.

Here in the USA, 2.0l rebuilt heads are cheap, plentiful and advance exchange remanufactured heads are typically cheaper then taking it to a local machine shop.


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If the engine was overheated, melted the plastic cover, i would have the head checked out by a machine shop, rebuilt or exchanged. At the bare minimum; it will need to be shaved to fix warped mating surfaces.

Here in the USA, 2.0l rebuilt heads are cheap, plentiful and advance exchange remanufactured heads are typically cheaper then taking it to a local machine shop.


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Well I didn't know they had plastics inside the head !, had a bugger of a time digging out the head bolts everything was melted, now all the valves are stuck open not one appears have touched the piston's, although valves are still in the head. I think the sump is the next off, ;) bought it cheap,( he said it has an oil leak, so can't start it.) if he could of started it, I would have given him a $1000-00 knowing what i have found today, it wouldn't of gone with ether, so your not the only one to find melted plastic, I took the timing plug out of the bellhousing to set it on TDC no1, to find the timing was way out, when I got the head off and checked the belt tensioner bolt was tight it was in the relaxed slack position so it had never been tensioned correctly, hence the jumped timing.

So with that said just pull it apart and blow every oil passage, oil pump, big ends, mains and start again,
its a long time since I have worked on a VW, I must admit the tech which has gone into these new ones , ! All be it 21 years old it is quite refreshing. once you get all the crap off it just like the first polo I changed the head gasket on 50 years ago.
now I need more bit than I expected :)
Hi Billymade, thanks for that, the exchange is not so cheap over here in Australia, have a couple of pictures of what I found, they say it all, I am holding a piece of melted plastic,
252277
252276
 

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Definitely, have a machine shop; check it out and see, if it is rebuildable. Seeing, how bad that looks; you might drop the oil pan and check the crank/rod bearings, for damage and see, if more repairs are needed. There is a plastic windage tray; in the bottom end, it is typically melted as well (that engine got very hot; we have seen this before).
 

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You might be better off sourcing another engine, golf, Jetta or Beetle will all work depending on year and engine. The junkyard should have plenty of choices with dead automatic transmissions attached to them.
 

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Well Guys, your right I bought a Boat anchor, here are some more pictures for a laugh. Did they use the same engine/ codes on other models, how do you know what will fit.
252291
252292
252293
 

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Yup, that motor was definitely hot and probably, the plastic valve splash cover/windage tray debris, caused oil starvation issues. Clogged oil pump, clogged oil pickup tube, rod bearing scoring, etc; all show signs of, oil clogged galleys and plastic debris, all caused the starvation, overheating, etc. issue(s). As to 2.0L engines; you might check your original engine code and then, research which would work. What would be more cost effective, in your are of Australia (?); rebuilding the original engine or a good used 2.0L? I guess, like any repair, you need to find out; what is a cost effective route to go. The 2.0L, in the USA, was one of the most plentiful engine; cheap used at junk yards and you might see what a rebuilt long block costs. I don't know, what 2.0L engines; were installed on Australian spec VWs; here is a good place to look, the 2.0L vwvortex faq area: 2.0 Liter Engine Forum

Most 2.0L blocks seem similar; as they progressed, external components, like fuel injection, intake manifolds and other things were revised (metal to plastic manifolds; cable driven throttle bodies to drive by wire, etc), these parts typically, can be transferred but getting the closest to the original would be preferable.

VW has a self study program; that goes over the 2.0L engine:

VAG SSP 233 – 2.0L Engine

 

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PS: if you have more "carnage" photos; of damaged or overheated parts, post them up! It is always interesting, to see; what gets damaged, in scenarios, such as this! It makes you wonder; what happened first, maybe severe overheating, caused by a cooling system failure issue?
 

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PS: if you have more "carnage" photos; of damaged or overheated parts, post them up! It is always interesting, to see; what gets damaged, in scenarios, such as this! It makes you wonder; what happened first, maybe severe overheating, caused by a cooling system failure issue?
Going to take right down so will add as I go, thanks for your help. If I could guarantee that I would get all the plastic out of crank and galleries I would rebuild
 

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Sounds good: we have had a number of members with the same issue; bought a dead 2.0L new beetle and found, major engine repairs needed! Bottom line: overheated with melted plastic, head, oil pan, clogged oil system and oil starvation issues. As to cleaning everything out; a machine shop, hot tanking, scrubbing out all the oil passages with engine "pipe cleaner" type brushes or pushing debris with flexible metal wire, etc. Then, cleaning with pressure washer, degreasing and blowing everything out with compressed air, would probably do the trick? Detailed cleaning: for things like oil squirters, galleys, bearing oil feeds, etc; would require some inspection and blowing things out, confirming everything is clear, would be in order? Might take some time; attention to detail but it can be done?
 

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If you have to pay someone to do all that cleaning, I can see that it might not be feasible to rebuild. Over here those particular years had a crappy automatic transmission attached to them, so the junkyard has many beetle, golfs and jettas that have a dead transmission but otherwise good engine.

The golfs and jettas share the same engine, some of the externals like coolant pipes are a bit different and would need to be swapped out. If you haven’t already discovered it the best way to pull the engine is to remove the front of the car and slide the engine out. Like in my avatar pic.
 
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