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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My fiance's 05 turbo beetle has thrown the p2195 code, sensor signal "biased" according to the advance auto folks. They said it was the bank 1 sensor 1 oxygen sensor and to find out which one it is and replace it. Well, everywhere online I look, it says there's two sensors under there, but when I go under there I see three. There's one in the pipe before the catalytic converter, one in the middle of the converter, and one in the pipe after the catalytic converter. I went to Napa because they know more than the idiots at Advance, and they sold me a bosch BSH 17014 sensor.

I tried replacing the one before the converter, becasue that's what I was told to do, but it is a different plug type into the little box where all three go into the main computer cable. I need advice here, I'm a Ford guy, not a foreign guy.
 

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http://engine-codes.com/p2195_volkswagen.html

Seeing how you have a generic code; it seems to be bank 1 sensor 1. Traditionally; that would be considered the first sensor, before the cat. To confirm a code like this; it would be nice to have a scanner that could read live data and you could see how the sensors are working. You could probably rent one; from a auto parts store. Let's assume; it is the first sensor, before the cat.

To find the correct Bosch parts; use the Bosch parts finder and use your vin # and engine code.

http://www.bosch-automotive-catalog.com/en/

Many times; a "universal" 02 sensor will be shown; be sure sure to choose the "Oem" version, so you get the exact same sensor as your original.

Here is how to find your engine code; it shows 2.0l but 1.8t is similar:

http://www.ngksparkplugs.com/pdf/tb-7192011vw.pdf

Another option, if you download the Bosch parts app for Android or iOS; you can input your vin # and look that way.

https://www.google.com/search?q=bos...urceid=chrome-mobile&espv=1&ie=UTF-8&hl=en-US

Another way to look; is to use the vw parts catalog online. If you are still having problems, finding the correct part try your local vw dealer with your vin#. Once you get the part # you can search online for the best price.

https://parts.vw.com/

Worst case scenario; remove the sensor and get the part #, off the original part itself.
 

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my husband says...

P2195 Volkswagen HO2S11 Sensor Signal Stuck Lean OBDII Engine Light Trouble Code | Engine-Codes.com

Seeing how you have a generic code; it seems to be bank 1 sensor 1. Traditionally; that would be considered the first sensor, before the cat. To confirm a code like this; it would be nice to have a scanner that could read live data and you could see how the sensors are working. You could probably rent one; from a auto parts store. Let's assume; it is the first sensor, before the cat.

To find the correct Bosch parts; use the Bosch parts finder and use your vin # and engine code.

Vehicle Search - bosch.com

Many times; a "universal" 02 sensor will be shown; be sure sure to choose the "Oem" version, so you get the exact same sensor as your original.

Here is how to find your engine code; it shows 2.0l but 1.8t is similar:

http://www.ngksparkplugs.com/pdf/tb-7192011vw.pdf

Another option, if you download the Bosch parts app for Android or iOS; you can input your vin # and look that way.

https://www.google.com/search?q=bos...urceid=chrome-mobile&espv=1&ie=UTF-8&hl=en-US

Another way to look; is to use the vw parts catalog online. If you are still having problems, finding the correct part try your local vw dealer with your vin#. Once you get the part # you can search online for the best price.

https://parts.vw.com/

Worst case scenario; remove the sensor and get the part #, off the original part itself.
My husband says... "Get a new fiance with an American car"...
 

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Well, if you want to diy repairs; you have to do some research on your own or at least give your parts supplier your VIN # and engine code to get correct parts. If whoever is working on the car; cannot figure this out, maybe you should take it to a professional and get the repair completed. We all have our limits; if he or she, is unwilling or unable, to do the work or figure things out... take it to someone who is. Check your PM's. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So, after much discussion and a quick call to the dealership for some free advice, I replaced the sensor upstream from the cat. I didn't get around to it until this weekend and the day I bought the new sensor, many more issues popped up.

Code P0303, cylinder 3 misfire
Code P2279, intake air leak
Code P2196, heated air sensor (just replaced it though..)

Any ideas on where to go from here? I really can't afford dealer prices, and try to do everything myself.
 

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Need to be careful with sensor replacements.

Sometimes they are necessary, MANY times O2 sensor related codes have NOTHING to do with a faulty O2 sensor.

But keep in mind, O2 sensors are "consumable" and they typically should be replaced every 100k miles or when they have a heater failure or for some reason have performance problems. Sometimes they need to be replaced long before 100k miles, sometimes they can last close to 200k miles.

Also fresh sensors often allow other problems to be "seen" much easier by the ECU. So it is not unusual for a fresh sensor to be more sensitive and be able to find other faults.

Fuel Trim values and Freeze Frame data are NECESSARY to better understand what is going on.

Most all misfires and Lean conditions are due to vacuum leaks from crack and deteriorating hoses and pipes, but can also be due to contaminated fuel or a soft fuel pump.

Coils, spark plugs and plug wires can be the source of misfires, but these usually happen at higher RPM's and under heavier engine load, not usually at idle.

Also ignition problems rarely have have high positive Fuel Trims or Lean codes associated with them.

Lean conditions however, can exaggerated ignition problems because Lean conditions can and will tax higher mileage/older ignition components. Often in the process of resolving Lean conditions, people mistakenly find ignition problems and "Think" the problem is found, when in fact there may still be an underlying Lean condition.

If you happened to use a "Universal" O2 sensor, it is VERY important that the O2 sensor wiring be correctly connected. The heater wires can be swapped, however, the O2 wires are polarity specific and if connected backwards can and will cause problems that can be VERY difficult to isolate and find even for a seasoned "Pro".

The more data that you can provide from the OBDII tool, the better we will be able to help.

Warm idle Fuel Trim values and Freeze Frame info would be very helpful at this point.
 

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Code P2196, heated air sensor (just replaced it though..)

When I replaced my 02 sensor; it had a code for the heater portion of the sensor being bad. After I replaced it and cleared the codes, the code came back. I did a "hard reset"; by touching the positive and negative battery cable ends, together for 30 seconds. After putting the cables; back together again, the codes went away and stayed away.
 
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