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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I get the P0411 code after replacing
  • SAP (Secondary air pump)
  • KOMBI Valve
  • Hoses to the KOMBI valve .

:flipper: Note : I paid $125 for diagnosis plus parts& lab. KOMBI Valve and hoses were replaced by the dealer herzog-meier Metro Portland VW Dealer in Beaverton Serving Salem - Herzog-Meier Volkswagen . I am Really disappointed with the service provided by the dealer. The dealer did not diagnose the problem correctly IMHO.

Any ideas from the forum members will be appreciated
 

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16795/P0411/001041 - Ross-Tech Wiki

Here is a VW tech; that goes through all the typical issues/components, that area issue with this code:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=08flKdnIBQk

When did the code come back; did you try, a hard reset and see if the code would come back? What scanner; are you using to read the codes?

If they did all that work; I would take it back to them and see what they can do for you, they certainly threw allot of new parts at the problem... .it is possible, they didn't diagnose the problem correctly.

Here are some articles on SAI system and how it works:

http://www.motor.com/magazine/pdfs/092007_04.pdf

http://www.motor.com/magazine/pdfs/082007_04.pdf

Good article; basic how to troubleshoot the problem:

http://www.tomorrowstechnician.com/de-bugging-new-beetle-engine-quirks/

DTC P0411 – Secondary Air Injection System incorrect flow detected: This code comes up almost daily. The typical cause is the failure of the vacuum hose to the check valve (combivalve) on the exhaust manifold. Just like EGR vacuum hoses have cracked and fallen off for years, this hose lives in a harsh environment not meant for rubber hose covered with cloth.

Here’s the diagnostic procedure for the P0411 code.

1. Start the cold engine and listen for the “vacuum cleaner” sound of the secondary air pump. The pump should run for up to 100 seconds during any cold start, and may run even after a warm start or after an extended idle.
2. If the pump runs, isn’t too noisy and shuts off after a couple of minutes, start tracing the hoses from and to the pump, and locate the check valve.
3. Inspect the small hose to the valve. Just touching it at the valve connection will usually verify the failure (the valve may be a little warm!).
4. If the hose has failed, replace it, preferably with a silicone hose of the correct size to prevent leakage and repeat failure.
5. With your scanner set to activations, run the pump relay, pump and control valve tests. Use a vacuum pump to make sure the check valve is not damaged (stuck open or closed).
6. If the pump is excessively noisy (experience is the best determining factor; they all make some noise), inspect the inlet hose for any signs of water entry. This is especially troublesome on models that have the pump mounted low in the engine compartment and draw air from the air cleaner. Like a vacuum cleaner, water getting into the pump will kill it in short order. The pump can also be damaged by exhaust getting past a stuck check valve. Always determine the cause of the pump failure before replacement, so the new pump isn’t immediately damaged.
 

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x2

x2, the vacuum hose to the cambi valve is probably cracked or leaking that would be a good start. You can also use a hand vacuum pump and cycle the valve to make sure it's opening all the way or supply 12 vdc to the solenoid to see if it's opening the vacuum valve.
 

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If you had the car to the stealership, they 'figured' out what the code meant and did the repairs...and the code came back in short order?

They should warranty their work. The parts replaced are probably common items that fail and trip the codes and solve the issue maybe 90% of the time. You have the 10% that it does not solve the issue, so the dealership should at the least re-do the diagnostics part for free.

S-
 
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