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An Air-Cooled Fan, Too!
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Our New Beetle, bought used 3 mos. ago, has a lot of paint imperfections and small rock chip marks on the frontal areas. Could going over these areas with a clay bar help cosmetically? How does one go abot applying a clay bar properly? By using with plain water, sudsy (car wash mixed) water, or a misting detailer like the one Meguiars puts out? :confused:
 

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I find that the Mothers clay bar kit is very good for being readily availble (Pep Boys). I do recommend buying an additional bottle of Quick Mist Detailer (I prefer Meguiar's).

The claying process will greatly help remove rough spots and smooth out the paint.

Do not use water, or soapy water. The quick-detailing sprays are best to use, as the clay needs a proper lubricant to prevent from sticking to the car. You will also have to wipe up as well.

Follow the claying with a good coat of wax (I like Meguiar's Gold Class paste), and you'll be good to go.

-Des
 

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Well, the clay bar will not help with things such as rock chips, and if the imperfections to the paint are under the clear coat (and not just as a result of something on the surface itself), the claybar will not help with that.

The main purpose of a claybar is to clean the surface. It helps in removing wax, as well as any airborne contaminents, dirt, grease, etc. It's just a very good cleaning tool.

If you are using the claybar to strip off an old coat of wax before applying a new one, I do not recommend using the detailer spray that often comes with some of those kits. That detailer spray contains a wax, which defeats the whole purpose.

Before I apply a new coat of wax, I always strip the old wax by first washing with Dawn dish soap (only time I use this, as it's a bit acidic, and will help remove the old wax). I then claybar the entire car, using a solution of water / car wash detergent), I then wash the car a second time, with just the car wash detergent.
 

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An Air-Cooled Fan, Too!
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Discussion Starter #5
It's some what confusing, but.....

See, that's what I was a little confused about. I read in another automotive forum some time back where a guy was using carwash H2O for the "lubricant" to claybar his truck. And, when I went to use a commerical demister/detailer (in my case it was Eagle One), it seemed to be "too slick" and I couldn't see where the clay was doing anything other than "gliding over the surface." Okay, I'll try it both ways: with the Meguiar's Quik Detailer and with just sudsy (car wash 'detergetn') water and see what seems to work...Thanks for the replies..:)
 

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#1 Auntie
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The clay bar works wonders on white cars. I live with a lot of dirt surrounding me, so Bugzzi gets dirty very easily and quickly. It eventually gets a yellowish tinge to the paint, without you really realizing it! After claying it, it's amazing to see. It also seemed to help minor little scratches.
 

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An Air-Cooled Fan, Too!
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Discussion Starter #10
bmxbugzzi said:
The clay bar works wonders on white cars. I live with a lot of dirt surrounding me, so Bugzzi gets dirty very easily and quickly. It eventually gets a yellowish tinge to the paint, without you really realizing it! After claying it, it's amazing to see. It also seemed to help minor little scratches.
That sounds great, but just how do you use it? When I spray the surface first with the detailers spray, like Eagle One or Meguiar's, it's so slick and slippery on the surface that it seems to me that the clay is gliding right over it and not removing much...:confused:
 

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Beetlebomb said:
That sounds great, but just how do you use it? When I spray the surface first with the detailers spray, like Eagle One or Meguiar's, it's so slick and slippery on the surface that it seems to me that the clay is gliding right over it and not removing much...:confused:
It's supposed to do just that, you don't want the claybar "sticking" to the surface as you use it. It sounds like you need a good buff job on the paint using polishing or, in extreme instances, rubbing, compound.

The claybar is really good at pulling surface contamanints out of the paint, which is why the paint is glass-smooth after you use it. Polishing & rubbing compounds do the same thing, but they actually remove a small layer of paint/clearcoat.

From what you describe, it sounds like you want the paint polished or buffed out. I don't think a claybar is going to give you the results you desire.
 
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