NewBeetle.org Forums banner

1 - 20 of 59 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
so i started spewing out coolant from my flange a few days ago and was not too far from my dads shop and really slowly drove it to park it. so i ordered the part and today i replaced it. Presto no more leak so i go to drive it and the red coolant light comes on and i freak out come to find out it sucked the coolant to under the sensor range so i filled it. well this happened several times. now the coolant level is steady right above the max line and the light is still blinking. My car is running really hot so im guessing its overheating. i just wanna know what the hell. i got the computer codes reset and in spite of my check engine light turning off which was nice the coolant light is still on and blinking. Someone help me please i feel so helpless.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
355 Posts
Coolant

You have larger issues here.
Get your car to a dealership ASAP.
The reason you overheated is still unknown.
I would be very cautious about driving that thing
with your issues.
You do not say what model you have, or how many miles, or if you bought the car with problems, so any help you need from this forum will need further info from you.

Another garage may be able to correctly diagnose your troubles,but a VW shop will surely have the ability.
Suck it up and make the trip.

Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
more info

Ok i have a 2000 1.8t glx with about 80000 miles. I got the car from the dealership use about 2 1/2 years and 40000 miles ago. I was reading and thinking that the waterpump may have failed. Thanks for anymore help.
 

·
Keep It Real
Joined
·
1,746 Posts
Yes, it is very possible that your water pump has gone bad, as CA Solt suggested, it would be a good idea to take your car into the VW dealership and have it checked out/serviced.

On another note, the coolant level should "not" be above the maximum line on the expansion tank, proper coolant levels are as follows: With a cold engine the coolant level should sit dead center of the Min. and Max. marks, with a fully warmed up engine the coolant level should be right on the Max. mark, also, you should be using VW/Audi G12 coolant "only".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
so i started spewing out coolant from my flange a few days ago and was not too far from my dads shop and really slowly drove it to park it. so i ordered the part and today i replaced it. Presto no more leak so i go to drive it and the red coolant light comes on and i freak out come to find out it sucked the coolant to under the sensor range so i filled it. well this happened several times. now the coolant level is steady right above the max line and the light is still blinking. My car is running really hot so im guessing its overheating. i just wanna know what the hell. i got the computer codes reset and in spite of my check engine light turning off which was nice the coolant light is still on and blinking. Someone help me please i feel so helpless.
So...I'm having this same exact issue! OMG!! Exactly...any help out there would be great! What did you do to fix the issue??
TIA
-Jon
 

·
Keep It Real
Joined
·
1,746 Posts
1. Have you checked the thermostat, it might be stuck closed.
2. Pull the thermostat and put your fingers in the hole, you should be able to feel the water pump "plastic" impeller to see if has broken off of the water pump, common issue with the factory style water pumps on these cars.
3. While you have the thermostat out, I suggest that you replace it and the o-ring seal with genuine factory parts "Only".
4. When all is said and done, make absolutely sure that you bleed all air from the system.

The coolant vacuum system is the best way to make sure that no air is left in the coolant system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Looks like I'll be doing a vacuum-fill/flush to remove the old coolant along with any residual air in the system...and replace the thermostat in the process...hopefully that will do the trick!
farfegnugen!
Thanks Too Cold!
 

·
Keep It Real
Joined
·
1,746 Posts
My pleasure, you are welcome! ...?

Don’t forget to feel for the water pump impeller while the thermostat is out.

If none of that fixes the problem, then I would suggest the next step to be a Block text, test the coolant for exhaust/combustion material.

The over heating issue could be the result of exhaust gases leaking into the cooling system due to a blown head gasket, hopefully this is not the case ...?

Please keep us posted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
My pleasure, you are welcome! ...?

Don’t forget to feel for the water pump impeller while the thermostat is out.

If none of that fixes the problem, then I would suggest the next step to be a Block text, test the coolant for exhaust/combustion material.

The over heating issue could be the result of exhaust gases leaking into the cooling system due to a blown head gasket, hopefully this is not the case ...?

Please keep us posted.
Thermostat purchased...now the practice in patience begins...??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Thermostat purchased...now the practice in patience begins...??
So, I took the Beetle out for a aquick spin to the local auto parts place and pressure-test the cooling system and along the 1.25 mile trip, the oil pressure sensor light and alarm went off...leading me to believe that I have something more sinister going on with this lovely vehicle...i guess i'll be taking this to the mechanic to see what is truly the matter with this thing...ugh!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,354 Posts
Did, you confirm, the waterpump impeller; was in good shape, when you replaced the thermostat? The original plastic impellers; are notorious, for cracks or spinning on the shaft.


After installation if a new thermostat or any repair service on the cooling sytem with substantial coolant loss; there will be AIR in the block and VW recommends, the use of the pressure fill tool. Other VW's like the Passat; had bleeder valves, to make their process easier, the 1.8T New Beetle's, in particular, are known for air pockets, in the block and will overheat quickly, after refill, if not vacuum filled and evacuating all air out of the system. This will be obvious, as the coolant bottle; can start bubbling, the temps will rise quickly and the coolant will be hot! This can be air in the system and a bad waterpump, impeller, can cause no circulation, causing a overheating condition.

Here are some tips; on bleeding the system without a vacuum bleeder fill tool:



Coolant temp light: modes and what they mean:

Blue coolant light = engine cold
Flashing blue coolant light = fault in the coolant monitoring system
Flashing red coolant light = low on coolant
Steady red coolant light = engine overheating, pull over and stop engine IMMEDIATELY and do not run until the problem has been identified.

I would scan for trouble codes with a vw specific scan tool; typically, a red light flashing on cold startup, would be low coolant or the coolant level sensor in the bottle, could be defective.

Bad water pumps, are very common on these cars; so, when the thermostat is out, it is advised to inspect the impeller, as it is exposed and you can see, if it is in good shape. The original water pumps, had a plastic composite impeller and crack, spin on the pump shaft or literally fall apart in pieces.

As noted, after a cooling system repair; the air needs, to be purged out of the cooling system or the engine will quickly overheat.

vacuum fill tool use:


purge air out of the cooling system without a tool, easy techniques:


Another note: a common fault; is the coolant temp sensor electrical circuit issues, that can cause the oil pressure temp sensor, to kick on and give you a false positive. I had this problem and in my case; the wiring to the coolant temp sensor was damaged, I replaced the plug, terminal ends and the sensor, (this FINALLY, solved the odd coolant light and oil pressure light problem). I got all my parts, from my local VW dealer; so, that is another issue, that could be the reason, your oil pressure light is kicking on.

Note: confirming the electrical issue: I was getting a "short to ground" trouble code; specific to the coolant temp sensor, when I scanned with VCDS by Ross Tech. My coolant temp light, was blinking and would not get off the blue color but remained, even when I got to normal operating temps. One wire terminal had broken off the plug; so, the temps were not being shown correctly with the coolant temp light.

In this scenario, I used a scan tool; to observe the noted coolant temps, compared with a infrared temp gun and also, tested my oil pressure with a traditional gauge. The results, of this testing; confirmed my coolant temps and oil pressure, were normal.

As noted by others, if all air bleeding, temp checks, no trouble codes, oil pressure is in spec and waterpump checks are good; then, a bad head gasket, could be a issue as well and a combustion leak tester, compression check would be next.

This MAY or MAY NOT; be the case, in your situation but keep in mind, of many scenarios that can happen. Troubleshooting the overheating issue and doing a process of elimination, through the results of testing, is the way to find the problem. Yes, this can be frustrating and confusing but the above testing, checks, should be performed. Hope this helps, thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
45 Posts
Did, you confirm, the waterpump impeller; was in good shape, when you replaced the thermostat? The original plastic impellers; are notorious, for cracks or spinning on the shaft.


After installation if a new thermostat or any repair service on the cooling sytem with substantial coolant loss; there will be AIR in the block and VW recommends, the use of the pressure fill tool. Other VW's like the Passat; had bleeder valves, to make their process easier, the 1.8T New Beetle's, in particular, are known for air pockets, in the block and will overheat quickly, after refill, if not vacuum filled and evacuating all air out of the system. This will be obvious, as the coolant bottle; can start bubbling, the temps will rise quickly and the coolant will be hot! This can be air in the system and a bad waterpump, impeller, can cause no circulation, causing a overheating condition.

Here are some tips; on bleeding the system without a vacuum bleeder fill tool:



Coolant temp light: modes and what they mean:

Blue coolant light = engine cold
Flashing blue coolant light = fault in the coolant monitoring system
Flashing red coolant light = low on coolant
Steady red coolant light = engine overheating, pull over and stop engine IMMEDIATELY and do not run until the problem has been identified.

I would scan for trouble codes with a vw specific scan tool; typically, a red light flashing on cold startup, would be low coolant or the coolant level sensor in the bottle, could be defective.

Bad water pumps, are very common on these cars; so, when the thermostat is out, it is advised to inspect the impeller, as it is exposed and you can see, if it is in good shape. The original water pumps, had a plastic composite impeller and crack, spin on the pump shaft or literally fall apart in pieces.

As noted, after a cooling system repair; the air needs, to be purged out of the cooling system or the engine will quickly overheat.

vacuum fill tool use:


purge air out of the cooling system without a tool, easy techniques:


Another note: a common fault; is the coolant temp sensor electrical circuit issues, that can cause the oil pressure temp sensor, to kick on and give you a false positive. I had this problem and in my case; the wiring to the coolant temp sensor was damaged, I replaced the plug, terminal ends and the sensor, (this FINALLY, solved the odd coolant light and oil pressure light problem). I got all my parts, from my local VW dealer; so, that is another issue, that could be the reason, your oil pressure light is kicking on.

Note: confirming the electrical issue: I was getting a "short to ground" trouble code; specific to the coolant temp sensor, when I scanned with VCDS by Ross Tech. My coolant temp light, was blinking and would not get off the blue color but remained, even when I got to normal operating temps. One wire terminal had broken off the plug; so, the temps were not being shown correctly with the coolant temp light.

In this scenario, I used a scan tool; to observe the noted coolant temps, compared with a infrared temp gun and also, tested my oil pressure with a traditional gauge. The results, of this testing; confirmed my coolant temps and oil pressure, were normal.

As noted by others, if all air bleeding, temp checks, no trouble codes, oil pressure is in spec and waterpump checks are good; then, a bad head gasket, could be a issue as well and a combustion leak tester, compression check would be next.

This MAY or MAY NOT; be the case, in your situation but keep in mind, of many scenarios that can happen. Troubleshooting the overheating issue and doing a process of elimination, through the results of testing, is the way to find the problem. Yes, this can be frustrating and confusing but the above testing, checks, should be performed. Hope this helps, thanks!
Thank you so much!! I'm feeling deflated, but don't want to give up and take it to the dealer just yet...this is one tricky Bugger...:cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,354 Posts
You are NOT alone! When my 2002 Turbo S, ran out of warranty; the plastic impeller cracked, fell apart and I couldn't figure out, why my 1.8T kept overheating. I could not for the life of me; think, it was the waterpump, as the car wasn't very old and had less then 40k on it. I had it diagnosed at my vw dealer, after being charged $100+, they thought it might be the waterpump; I took it into VW, as I had been having all the warranty work done there, before. After pulling the thermostat, I discovered the impeller broke into three pieces and was NOT spinning at all, the coolant wasn't even circulating. That forced me to work on my car and I did the first full waterpump, timing belt job, upgrading my waterpump to a metal impeller. Check out bluparts or fcpeuro; for timing belt and waterpump kits.
 

·
Keep It Real
Joined
·
1,746 Posts
So, I took the Beetle out for a aquick spin to the local auto parts place and pressure-test the cooling system and along the 1.25 mile trip, the oil pressure sensor light and alarm went off...leading me to believe that I have something more sinister going on with this lovely vehicle...i guess i'll be taking this to the mechanic to see what is truly the matter with this thing...ugh!
So to be clear, it is the “Oil pressure” light and audio indicator that are going off, not the “Coolant light” and related audio indicator being triggered?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,482 Posts
Like i have been telling ya'll before that these beetles do self bleeding from air bubbles after you do coolant repairs. You just have to keep adding coolant after the level goes down in the reservoir as the air bleeds out since the reservoir is the highest point in the coolant system all air goes to the top as the coolant circulates in the system. Just do a little bit of driving & keep adding fluid in the reservoir until the level doesn't go down anymore means all the air has self bleed. The video in post 12 shows that.
 

·
Keep It Real
Joined
·
1,746 Posts
The self bleed process is not guaranteed, Beetles have been said to be the hardest to bleed out of all the MKIV’s.

Air pockets often form in the heater core and can a nightmare to remove, short of the vacuum method Via the proper tool (which the VW Dealer uses), you ”might not“ be able to remove all air no matter how long you drive the car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,354 Posts
Definitely, a issue: i ended up buying the Uview airlift vacuum filler tool part # 550000, back when my first composite impeller water pump failed and still use it, when i do cooling system repairs. The fact that the vw factory service manual; indicates this is required and shows their specific version of the tool, is a acknowledgment of the problem. There are many of these type of tools these days for affordable prices online; many Chinese knock offs and brands like ECSTuning/Schwaben, are not prograde level tools but will do the job. This requires a compressor/shop air but it makes the job a snap, plus quickly confirms if there are any leaks in the system.

If you do not have a vacuum filler tool: some have mentioned raising the front end with ramps or jack stands to aid the filling process, drilling a small hole in the thermostat (to help equalize coolant levels in the block), cracking open hoses near the heater core until the coolant comes out, making sure the return line to the coolant bottle is not clogged, following some of the "messaging" techniques, shown on youtube, can help the burping process.

Because of overheating, potentially damaging things (head-gaskets, water-pump bearings/seals), etc) and to be able to rule out air pockets as a possible cause, of overheating; acquiring the tool, made sense to me and it has been a great investment, diagnostic cooling service, time saver. Using the tool, evacuating the air pockets, confirming the cooling system is leak free, air tight and fully filled, allows you to move onto other possible reasons for a overheating issue. It is quick, easy to use and your done! Many repairs, are much easier; when you have the right tool for the job, this is one of those tools.
 

·
Keep It Real
Joined
·
1,746 Posts
I agree, I own this exact tool (Airlift UVIEW #550000) and it is the only way to go, it is a high quality inexpensive complete tool.

it does the job in a short period of time without running the engine, without coolant loss, boil overs or guess work.

Clean, simple, thorough evacuation of air.
 
1 - 20 of 59 Posts
Top