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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Everyone,

I haven't been on here latetly because we moved from South Carolina to Vermont. This poses an new concern for my little buggy. One - we get some serious snow and I am not sure I will have enough clearance. Two- I have 225-45-17 tires that are apparently hard to get up here and they need to be special ordered when it comes to snow tires. My question is - has anyone put studded snow tires on their vert bettle and been ok in the snow? My buggy also has "ESP" traction control - if i turn that off and have studded snows - will I be ok or do I park her and drive the Land Rover-gas guzzler? thanks for al your help.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
tires

Also, being that it is only front wheel drive - do I need to do all 4?
 

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Also, being that it is only front wheel drive - do I need to do all 4?
I would not recommend studded tires unless you plan on driving on ice a lot. Studded tires on regular roads will drive you bonkers with the noise and vibration. I would recommend regular winter tires and yes all around! Putting winter tires on the front and not the rear does not make sense. Generally winter tires are made of much softer Rubber which the tires stay more pliable in cold conditions. They also wear faster than harder compound tires so I would only drive of them in the winter months and than switch back to summer or all season radials. The best solution would be to get a set of inexpensive 15 or 16 inch rims and put winter tires on them rather than switching out the tires on your existing 17 inch rims.
15 or 16 inch wheels are also overall better for winter/snow since the tires will give you more rubber on the sidewall which allows for more flex and better cold and snow traction.
Check the tire rack they always have Great deals on winter wheels and tires. Probably less for a set than what you would be able to buy at your local tire dealer.
http://www.tirerack.com/snow/WinterTireCompare.jsp?minLoad=LL&sortSize=15&snowSortCode=19131&autoYear=2005&autoMake=Volkswagen&autoModel=Beetle&autoModClar=GLS+1.8T&winterType=A&startIndex=0&performance=W&search=true

You can get some Good Winter Tires for as low as 74 Dollars each and have them put on some $47 dollar steelies. Great winter package for around 484 bucks.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks so much IndyTom
 

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Dreamin' of a Bug !
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Winters tires all around is the best and safest option.

They are a much softer rubber, as mentioned above, so it's recommended to change them when the temperatures falls below 7 degrees and vice Versa. I have always switched over to winter tires every winter, and they make the world of a difference.
 

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For your winter tires I would suggest purchasing separate black steel winter wheels of the standard size and then put your winter tires on those. So back to the 205/55/R16 size. This gives you less wheel and more rubber which is what you want in rougher winter driving. Also, come spring the pot holes are going to destroy your low profiles. Which is why they're harder to get the further north you go, they become a liability beyond any esthetic gain.

Studs are not required for paved road winter driving, and not recommended I believe.

Clearance can be an issue, make sure your skid plate is in good condition. If you get a huge snowfall, well you have the Land Rover for a reason, but for the rest of the time once the roads have been cleared the Beetle is fine. The worst part of winter driving isn't the snow, it's the ice. Especially at intersections where you get what we call black ice, it's incredibly slick and very difficult to get traction on. You also have a hard time seeing it until it's too late.

With winter driving the big important thing to remember, this is what I tell people learning to drive, keep it low and slow. Low gear, slow speeds, low gear, slow acceleration.

Winter tires only help, they don't turn a skating rink into dry black top.
 

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Winters tires all around is the best and safest option.

They are a much softer rubber, as mentioned above, so it's recommended to change them when the temperatures falls below 7 degrees and vice Versa. I have always switched over to winter tires every winter, and they make the world of a difference.
I hope you meant to say 7 degrees Celcius which is about 44.6 degrees Fahrenheit. ;)
Good idea to put on winter tires. In most European countries it is required and if it isn't most of the people there have the common sense to swap them out anyway. Here in the states people drive on bald summer tires in 10 inches of snow and wonder why they caused an accident. Or you have the tough 4x4 SUV drivers that think they are impervious to ice and snow and speed by you going 75 mph when there is major snow on the road, only to find themselves upside down in a ditch a couple of miles down the road.

I am glad there are still some people with common sense and regard for safety for themselves and others.
 

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I'm currently using Big O brand all-season tire and love it. I don't know if you have a Big O in Vermont but I highly recommend it. I think the price was around $125/tire. It's quiet and has great traction on ice. My job is 40 minutes away so driving on icy roads is a part of life in the winter. Keep your ESP on and ONLY turn it off if you get stuck in snow. Your ground clearance should not be a problem unless you get a foot or more. If you are driving through deep snow, do NOT stop unless you have to. You need the momentum to make it through. Practice driving in a parking lot on ice. Do not panic. Slow down on bridges, overpasses, and on/off ramps. Do not slam on the brakes. Shift down when possible instead of braking. Be aware of snow that gets built up in the undercarriage and wheel wells - it may need to melt off or be kicked off before you drive again.

Beetles are great in the snow. You'll do fine.
 

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Dreamin' of a Bug !
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I hope you meant to say 7 degrees Celcius which is about 44.6 degrees Fahrenheit. ;)
Good idea to put on winter tires. In most European countries it is required and if it isn't most of the people there have the common sense to swap them out anyway. Here in the states people drive on bald summer tires in 10 inches of snow and wonder why they caused an accident. Or you have the tough 4x4 SUV drivers that think they are impervious to ice and snow and speed by you going 75 mph when there is major snow on the road, only to find themselves upside down in a ditch a couple of miles down the road.

I am glad there are still some people with common sense and regard for safety for themselves and others.
Yes seven degrees Celsius ... I live in Canada, lol ...

Even if it was a law people would still drive without them. It's a law in Quebec, and still numerous people are caught without them. I change them over simply because I find it safer and easier to drive through the snow.
 
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