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Discussion Starter #1
I am going to change plugs in my 1.8 t its about 50k on the present set. What plug works best with this engine. I know some times its best to use the factory supllied plugs. Tx for your comments.
 

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Gustav
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If your motor and ECM are stock stick with stock plugs NGK PFR 60 VW knows what they are doing.
You don't need a big hot spark in a compressed environment your producing plenty of heat as it is.

As you tune your motor and increase your boost you will need to go with a cooler plug and a smaller spark gap. My tuned motor gets NGK copper core plugs and are gaped down to .27 from the factory .32 spec.
I replace my copper plugs every 5K miles but they are cheep.

Do not gap the Platinum plugs as it will damage the electrode.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the info, why do the plugs for this engine have such a short milage range. The plugs in my eldo (northstar) are good for 100k.
 

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Gustav
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Thanks for the info, why do the plugs for this engine have such a short milage range. The plugs in my eldo (northstar) are good for 100k.
Heat kills!
IMG_0829.jpg
This is a factory Plug with 164000 miles on it I pulled it from my VR6 when I bought it from the original owner he never had them replaced.
"VW recommends that this plug should be replaced every 90K miles."
Hard to belive I was still getting close to EPA rated MPG with the plugs in this condition.
The power on the other had suffered greatly.
VW are tough to kill even when neglected.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Just completed this job yesterday. Used factory recommend plugs. Old plugs didn't look real bad but the electrodes were clearly worn.If you have over 40 k on your plugs change them! I cant believe the increase in power. Almost like i had made some engine modifications. I was begining to think the turbo wasnt woking . Be sure to use some antiseize lube on the plug threads. I neglected to do this last time and the plugs were tough to remove,i was afraid i was going to break off the thread part of the plug.
 

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The 1.8T in its stock form; is a fun and powerful engine, most people do not maintain them like they should. Everything, should be kept up in the service area; you will be rewarded by a good and powerful running engine. The problem with many service parts; is the degrading of power, happens over time and you don't realize, how things have degraded! Glad you got the plugs replaced; you might also, see what the part # is on your coils, they ALSO degrade over time and lose their power/efficiency. A new set of coils; can make a HUGE difference; if they are old and worn out.
Let us know; what the part number is and you can see, if they are the latest revision. There was a number of design revisions and recalls on these, they were a ongoing failure problem. The latest revision; has been more reliable and I have not had a failure, since mine were changed to the latest oem BREMI genuine VW part # 06A905115D, unless you have the bolt down Hitachi style coil packs.

Also, good call on the anti seize and using the dialectic ignition grease, on the ends of the coils is a good idea as well.

Loctite 37535 - Dielectric Compound/Grease; Dielectric Tune-Up Grease

Permatex 22058 Dielectric Tune-Up Grease, 3 Oz. Tube

Look at ecs tuning for the common parts and coils: (note: I am not recommending ecs tuning; just using them as a reference)

https://www.ecstuning.com/News/MKIV18t_CoilpackOptions/
 

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Gustav
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When replacing the spark plugs, a common mistake people make is use anti-seize on them.
Rightly so they want to prevent the plugs from seizing inside the head. Maybe it is a good idea with crappy plugs and an old iron head but you should never do this with a 1.8T motor and NGK plugs.

Using anti-seize on spark plugs will do the following:
Alters the tightening torque by up to 20% which may cause over-tightening (or breaking the spark bolt)
Reduces electrical ground contact if the anti-seize is non-conductive or semi-conductive (reduced spark possible)
Isolates more heat into the spark plug therefore causing the plug to increase the heat range above specification (can cause detonation/pre-ignition)
Creates a big goopy mess when tightening
The thing with NGK plugs is that they are already self-lubricating and corrosion resistant. They have to be installed dry. Never put anti-seize on them. I used to only coat the washer but as of recently found no need to even do that. Change those plugs once in a while and they will never seize up and you get great gas mileage.
 

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Here is a good tech bulletin from NGK:

http://randakksblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/dyk_5points.pdf

Five Things You Need to Know About Spark Plugs

1. Anti-seize
NGK spark plugs feature what is known as Trivalent plating. This silver or chrome colored finish
on the threads is designed to provide corrosion resistance against moisture and chemicals. This
coating also acts as a release agent during spark plug removal. NGK spark plugs
are installed at the factory dry, without the use of anti-seize. NGK tech support
has received a number of tech calls from installers whom have over-tightened
spark plugs because of the use of anti-seize. Anti-seize compound can act as a
lubricant altering torque values up to 20 percent, increasing the risk of spark plug thread
breakage.

2. Corona Stain
Corona stain is observed as a light brown or tan discoloration above the hex (located on the
ceramic body of the spark plug). Corona stain is created by oil or dirt particles
surrounding the spark plug. Spark plugs create a high amount of static
electricity as they fire, attracting these particles to the exposed ceramic
between the plug boot and the hex. Corona stain is completely normal and
should not be mistaken for exhaust gas blow-by or broken seals inside the spark plug.

3. Gapping fine-wire spark plugs
In the late 1980’s, when fine-wire spark plugs first appeared, installers used incorrect gap tools
and procedures resulting in broken-off firing electrodes. As a result, many
people assumed that one cannot adjust the gap on a precious metal plug.
While most NGK spark plugs are pre- gapped, there are instances where the
gap requires modification. NGK recommends a wire-style or feeler gage gap
tool, which can adjust the gap without prying against the center electrode. NGK also
recommends adjusting the gap no more than +/-0.008” from the preset gap.

4. Torque
Torque is critical in the plug’s ability to dissipate heat and perform properly. Always follow the
manufacturer’s recommended torque specification. An under-torqued spark
plug can lead to excessive vibration and improper heat dissipation, causing
spark plug and/or engine damage. An over-torqued spark plug may cause
thread damage or breakage, or compromise internal seals within the spark
plug, leading to improper heat dissipation or exhaust gas blow-by.

5. “Copper plugs”
“Copper spark plugs” is a term mistakenly used for a standard material spark plug. A standard
material spark plug traditionally uses a nickel-alloy outer material fused to a
copper core. Almost all spark plugs use a copper core center to conduct the
electricity, jump the gap, and promote heat dissipation. However, as an
outer electrode material, copper would not be a good choice, as it is soft and
has a low melting point (resulting in a plug that would last minutes, not miles). All NGK spark
plugs, including precious metal Iridium and Platinum, have a copper core.
When one talks in terms of nickel alloys, platinum and iridium, one is referring to its durability,
or how long a spark plug will last before it needs to be replaced. However, when one talks
about copper, he or she is referring to its ability to conduct electricity that is needed to fire
across the gap and ignite the air/fuel mixture.

For more information please call NGK Technical Support at 1-877-473-6767 ext. 2, or visit us on
the web at ngksparkplugs.com.

©2011 NGK Spark Plugs (U.S.A.), Inc
46929 Magellan Drive - Wixom, MI 48393
877-473-6767 - ngksparkplugs.com
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Lots of good information here ! I used the anti seize because I had difficulty removing the plugs , they had not been removed In awhile ,and I was worried about breaking them off My 2k bug only has 85k miles on it so I guessing I removed them six or seven years ago, also I don't remember if a used a torque wrench either. I was aware of the possibility increased torque but at 22 lbs. I thought that it would be ok. I've had plenty of trouble in the past with aluminum blocks in the past with bolts seizing up due to dissimilar metals.
I have these newer coils that bolt in. Thanks again for all the input , who would have thought .
 

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I feel the same way; back in my vw air cooled days with those heads, it was not uncommon for the plugs to gall, seize and ruin the delicate threads. While, it now seems to be not recommended on these modern plugs; I just put a tiny little bit on the threads. I definitely; don't want problems getting my plugs out but maybe my fears are unfounded, with the modern "Trivalent plating" on the threads? I'm afraid; my fear of stuck plugs, is outweighing my faith in NGK claims!? Maybe, I am stuck in the stone age? I suppose; one could compensate on their torque wrench; 20% if you were really paranoid, of stripping out the threads?


Sent from AutoGuide.com Free App
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Sometimes technology is great in theory only . Did the coating break down after all those years ? All I know is that I had a hell of a time getting them out. I had to use a breaker bar with slow even pressure , they fought me till the last few turns of thread . I was afraid one of these things was going to break off. The treads were good with no visible chunks or metal hanging around but were dirty . How far does the threaded part of the plug screw into the combustion chamber . Those plugs seem screw in a considerable length based on the length of the thread and where the plug gasket is located .
 

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Ugh, THAT is NOT a good feeling; when getting plugs out (I have been there)! :mad: I have had just portions of the plug break off and not hurt the threads. Fixing plug hole threads; would not be fun! Time Sert; makes some nice repair kits though; while expensive, they are fun to use! :)

+ TIME-SERT® SPARK PLUG THREAD REPAIR KITS + spark plug stripped thread repair kits for spark plug problems, thread stripped spark plug repairs in damaged threads in spark plug hole stripped out approved thread repair, aluminum head spark plug repair
 

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I feel the same way; back in my vw air cooled days with those heads, it was not uncommon for the plugs to gall, seize and ruin the delicate threads. While, it now seems to be not recommended on these modern plugs; I just put a tiny little bit on the threads. I definitely; don't want problems getting my plugs out but maybe my fears are unfounded, with the modern "Trivalent plating" on the threads? I'm afraid; my fear of stuck plugs, is outweighing my faith in NGK claims!? Maybe, I am stuck in the stone age? I suppose; one could compensate on their torque wrench; 20% if you were really paranoid, of stripping out the threads?


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I'm 100% with you on this one, maybe it's a combination of usually driving older cars and having spent too much time in the rustbelt. Salt would always make it's way into everything even if you didn't drive it at all.
 
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