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squirreljuice
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Ok so my fuel economy is starting to take a serious nose dive, ad so i'm thinking its probably time for some new plugs, and this is probably still a good idea because I bought the car used and I don't know when the last time the previous owner changed them was. I do know they didn't take car of the car though...
Anyway, I have heard that the sprkplugs for the 1.8 motors is in the vacuum reservoir. Is this true? And how the heck am I supposed to get to them to change them? Any insight would be greatly appreciated!
 

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Be sure to get a ratchet extension (5" I think), swivel and plug socket combination. You don't want to leave the socket on a plug when you try to remove it - very difficult to get out. The plugs are not hard to do and easy to figure out if you are handy. They are under the individual coils in the center of the head. Good luck.
b
 

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The Leo Bug
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I recently went to get my car fixed that they said they replaced the vacuum pump or whatever and I was wondering if that meant they changed the spark plugs as well? How would i know if my spark plugs have been changed bc my MPG seems to be going down as well.
 

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I recently went to get my car fixed that they said they replaced the vacuum pump or whatever and I was wondering if that meant they changed the spark plugs as well? How would i know if my spark plugs have been changed bc my MPG seems to be going down as well.
Your receipt would be a good place to start, but I'm certain if they did, they would have made mention, and typically gottten your permission for the additional expense. Worn or fouled spark plugs are just one reason for a decrease in mpg. Oil changes, clean air filter, clean fuel filter, and other things can be just as important in maintaining a good mpg, and as cheaper, and needing more frequent attention, are the first places to stgart looking when mpg falls off. The book does show spark plug replacement at 40k mile intervals, however.

MORAV
 

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I recently went to get my car fixed that they said they replaced the vacuum pump or whatever and I was wondering if that meant they changed the spark plugs as well? How would i know if my spark plugs have been changed bc my MPG seems to be going down as well.
LOL, why would you assume that they changed your spark plugs when they replaced the vaccum pump? Those two items are not related whatsoever. Two different things in two totally different locations.
Make sure you bring your car to a reputable shop that specializes in VW/Audi vehicles. Don't trust your car to just anybody.
 

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Wife's 01 1.8T mechanic
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Call your local VW dealer first to make sure the coil pack recalls have been done first, and register with VW so you will get the recall notices in the future.

Use Bosch Platinum plugs, use anti-seize on the threads, and torque properly.

If you don't have the proof that the timing belt and water pump was done before you bought it, get it done (or DIY) ASAP. A destroyed engine could be in your near future if you delay.
 

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please use anti-sieze on the steel threads that go into your aluminum head on your beetle. The steel and aluminum react causing galvanic corrosion. Makes them very difficult to remove or causes the threads in the head to come out with them when you take them out. Causes a ton of work to repair the threads or requires new head casting and big bucks to fix.
 

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please use anti-sieze on the steel threads that go into your aluminum head on your beetle. The steel and aluminum react causing galvanic corrosion. Makes them very difficult to remove or causes the threads in the head to come out with them when you take them out. Causes a ton of work to repair the threads or requires new head casting and big bucks to fix.
I second that. I have always used Antiseize on my threads in my 01 and 04 Audi TT 1.8 and also the 00 New Beetle. The previous owner didn't and those plugs were a pain to remove. But just a little bit of Antiseize those plugs will never stick to the heated aluminium. Antiseize or Bust. Anything less would be uncivilized. :)
 

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VW does not recommend using anti-seize on spark plugs; so I guess you guys know more than the enginweers who designed the car. :banghead:
This is a shade-tree practice that has been around since before plugs were plated!

Here's what Autolite says about using anti-seize

We do not recommend the use of any anti seize products for installing spark plugs. Anti seize compounds are typically composed of metallic,
electrically conductive ingredients. If anti seize compounds come in
contact with the core nose of the plugs, it can lead to a misfire condition.
Anti seize compounds can also have a torque multiplying effect when
installing plugs. This can lead to thread distortion and thread galling
resulting in cylinder head damage. Autolite spark plugs are nickel plated
to resist the effects of corrosion and seizing. However, plug seizure is
aggravated further when steel plugs are installed into aluminum cylinder
heads for a long period of time.


Here's what AC/Delco says:

Do not use any type of anti-seize compound on spark plug threads. Doing this will decrease the amount of friction between the threads. The result of the lowered friction is that when the spark plug is torqued to the proper specification, the spark plug is turned too far into the cylinder head. This increases the likelihood of pulling or stripping the threads in the cylinder head. Over-tightening of a spark plug can cause stretching of the spark plug shell and could allow blowby to pass through the gasket seal between the shell and insulator. Over-tightening also results in extremely difficult removal.

From NGK:

Hello, The use of anti-seize is not recommended by NGK. The anti-seize has atendency to act as a lubricant during tightening and can cause the plugto be over tightened which can cause damage to the plugs and or thecylinder heads. The trivalent zinc-chromate coating that is on all our plugs is all thatis needed to prevent seizure in the heads. Also be sure to tighten theplug to the correct torque as too much or too little can also cause theplug to become seized. For a 14mm diameter plug in an aluminum cylinder head with a gasketseat, the correct tightening torque is between 18-21.6 ft lbs or fingertight plus one half to two thirds a turn (180-240 degrees) Hope thishelps, thank you. Best regards, Brandon Peeler Technical Support Representative Aftermarket Division NGK Spark Plugs (U.S.A.), INC. 46929 Magellan Dr. Wixom, MI 48393

Heres the Pelican Parts explanation:
"Install each plug into the cylinder heads without using any anti-seize compound. Torque the spark plugs to 25 Nm (18.4 ft-lbs). While writing "How to Rebuild and Modify Porsche 911 Engines", I discovered that Porsche doesn’t recommend the use of anti-seize compound, as detailed in Porsche Technical Bulletin 9102, Group 2, identifier 2870. The bulletin applies retroactively to all Porsche models..."

http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/forums/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=1892994

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Wife's 01 1.8T mechanic
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I know enough to know that the engineers made a bad choice when they spec'd a coolant system with a plastic impeller along with plastic fittings. ;)

In all seriousness, I am well aware of what plug OEMs call for on instal. I don't use anti sieze on my iron head V8s, never have. However, a plug that has welded itself into an aluminum head is impossible to remove, and a dab of anti seize prevents that. We're not dealing with new cars here, they are getting old. Having worked on cars for a long time, I torque my plugs by feel, and have never had a problem. Of course, YMMV...
 

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I know enough to know that the engineers made a bad choice when they spec'd a coolant system with a plastic impeller along with plastic fittings. ;)
I expect the plastic impeller was more a decision by the purchasing dept than the engineering dept.

I have been working on cars a long time as well, and I would like you to name one company that specs the use of anti-seize on spark plugs in an aluminum head. Any one in the world...

Anti-seize is an oil based product that will burn down and turn to soot over time making the plugs difficult to remove. I used to use it as well until I did some research. (not research on Internet forums)
 
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