VW Beetle Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Ive lurked the forums for the past 2 years and they’ve never let me down but this is the first time I’ve had a question to ask I stripped the bolt that connects the sway bar end link to the control arm and I’ve found that the bolt is (m10x55x32) could anyone assist in what size tap I would need to re-thread the threads? Any info will be helpful and appreciated, also I have a leak from my water pump I have the new water pump but my dad told me that if I didn’t do the timing right then i could mess up the engine, I’ve already bought the water pump and have been considering doing the task myself because of my severe trust issues with mechanics, I’m not a mechanic myself but I do all my maintenance to my vehicles myself and was just wondering if I’d I should take a shot at it myself. I’m receiving the code (P1118) I replaced the coolant temp sensor witch is what the code was related too but it also could be a faulty thermostat, I was just curious since my water pump has a leak could that trigger the code (P1118)? I want to get the work done sooner rather then later since she’s at 181k the leaking coolant isn’t from any of the hoses I’ve checked them all and is coming from the water pump area so I assume it’s the water pump, it leaks more after I park it from a long drive, or when I drive fast any advice with be greatly appreciated thank you!
Tire Wheel Automotive tire Hood Motor vehicle
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,363 Posts
Take the old bolt; down to a hardware store or industrial fastener supplier, they could help you identify it or order a new bolt through your local VW dealer. Then you can put a nut on the new bolt; when you find one that fits correctly, you will have identified the correct pitch.


The other option, is to use a thread pitch gauge; they are not too expensive (e.g. $5 @ Lowe’s) and are typically sold, where the taps/dies are.

Once, you id the pitch and size, you can use a “thread chaser” to restore the threads or use a correct tap, which creates new threads, the chaser doesn’t remove metal but the tap does. The thread restorer is better, keeps the strength of the original threads, which is better but taps can be easier to find.


Sometimes, neither of these tools can fix the problem and the hole is damaged, too large; in that case, you might go with a steel thread insert. These are sold under a number of brands; one of the best is “time sert”; Which comes in a kit; that has everything, you need to drill the hole and install the new threaded steel insert, restoring the hole with new threads.


Lastly, you could buy a new lower control arm and a new bolt from your local Volkswagen dealer; that would give you, all new parts. This would not, require you to figure out the technical aspects of thread pitch, bolt size and have to buy new taps or dies, or the thread insert. Lower control arms are typically worn out and need replacement anyway; that would be less detailed figuring out things but does require more disassembly of the suspension and require an alignment to restore things back, to correct specs.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk kit
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,600 Posts
Go to autozone and buy a helicoil for the sway link mount point. The helicoil kit will have the necessary parts except for the drill bit, but it will tell you on the package what size bit to use and instructions on how to make the repair. Of course there is always you tube to help also.

At 180k miles you’re about due for a bushing /suspension refresh is you’ve no already done so. You can buy new lower control arms with the bushings already installed. The advantage of new arms is you won’t have to repair the threads on your old one.


There is one thing that you should be aware of the mounting point for the front bolt on the lower control arm goes into the subframe. The place where it attaches VW has graciously attached a round headed nut within the subframe itself and somebody did a really poor job of attaching that round nut that is hidden within the subframe.

If you are in the rust belt you will almost certainly break the hidden nut loose and not be able to extract the bolt that secures the front part of the lower control arm. To access that nut and reattach it will require cutting a small “door” in your subframe. This guy drilled holes I cut a small door opened it to get at the nut then closed it after I was done.



Your dad is correct if you screw up the timing you can ruin your engine, or at least damage it so that a replacement is in order. Be absolutely certain you understand how the timing procedure is done because you will have to take the timing belt loose to change the water pump. There is a write up on here somewhere on doing the timing belt.

 

·
Registered
1964 Deluxe, 2005 GLS 2014 Rline
Joined
·
381 Posts
For the amount of time you would spend trying to get that bolt out and recutting the thread you could have fitted a new control arm. It’s honestly probably due new ball joints and bushes anyway.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top