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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This DIY is for Replacing the Engine Timing Belt and Water Pump.

Technical Note: The Timing Belt has to come off to change the Water Pump, so you might as well change it to.

If you want to change the Thermostat as well, here is the DIY Thread for that.

DISCLAIMER: The author(s) assume that you (the reader) are reasonably capable with the automotive tools necessary to get the job accomplished, which means that you won’t glue your fingers together or use a cutting torch to get the bad part out and are smart enough to know not to try to blame or post ranting about anyone else if something goes horribly wrong ... AGREED?

These instructions were developed using the following NB...

1) 2000 APH 1.8 liter Turbo, 5 speed, O2J Transmission

As always, just remember to offer a simple thank you and credit to the original author (D2Beetle) when you tell all of your BUG buddies!!

TIME NEEDED: 6 Hours.

ITEMS NEEDED: An eBahn Bentley DVD or Haynes manual.

PROJECT COST: $ ???.??

SPECIAL TOOLS: Engine Support Bridge; also a T10092 and T40011.

WARNINGS: THE MOTOR MOUNT BOLTS should NOT be reused.

CAUTIONS: Be careful not lose any reusable Screws/Nuts/Bolts. The front passenger side of your NB must be supported by a jack, so take extra safety precautions to prevent any accidents.

Here are the steps simplified...

00) Raise the Car.
01) Drain the coolant.
02) Remove the Sound Panels.
03) Remove the Turbo Inlet Tube.
04) Remove Front Passenger Side Inner Wheel Well Guard.
05) Remove the Serpentine Belt and Tensioner.
06) Remove the Coolant Expansion Tank.
07) Remove Upper Timing Belt Cover.
08) Install the Motor Support.
09) Remove the Passenger Side Frame/Motor Mount.
10) Remove the Block Motor Mount.
11) Set the Crank and Cam to TDC (Top Dead Center). Take a picture of both marks so you know where your current marks are at.
11-1) Remove the Crank Serpentine Pulley.
11-2) Remove the Lower Timing Belt Cover.
11-3) Remove the Turbo Air Intake Tube.
12) Release the Tension on the Timing Belt Tensioner.
13) Remove Crank Sprocket Cover.
14) Remove the OLD Timing Belt.
15) Remove the Idler Roller.
16) Remove the Timing Belt Tensioner.
17) Remove the Water Pump.
18) Clean the Block Surface before installing any new parts.
19-1) Install New Tensioner.
19-2) Install New Idler Roller.
19-3) Install New Water Pump.
20) Put the New Timing Belt on and hand crank the engine 8 to 10 times.
21) Recheck Your Timing Marks. Repeat Steps 20 and 21 as many times as it takes to get the CAM and Crank at TDC.

So let’s begin ...

The kit that I installed is from Frank Irving. So I will be buying another kit for Cowboy when I get to that point in that project.

Step Zero: Raise the car. Remove Center (Yellow) and Passenger Side (Orange) Sound Panels. I use jack-stands on all corners except the front passenger side, there I use a floor jack [TBWP DIY 001 & 002]. Remove the front passenger tire.

Step One: Drain the Coolant, which is done in two parts; here is the DIY Thread for the first part and coolant drained in this manner can be reused, if needed. Second disconnect a coolant hose (Yellow Circles) from the Oil Cooler [CCH DIY 008].

Second Part: Place a container under the car, with a splash mat; I used an ex-large pet training mat [TBWP DIY 003]. Disconnect a coolant hose from the Oil Cooler, which the pics were supposed to be be found here; however I had a problem downloading images from the camera and lost a few in the process. Now my computer does not recognize the camera. :banghead: So I have posted a pic from Cowboy's Cylinder Head Rebuild Project to show you the hose that I disconnected; yellow #1 in the pic [CCH DIY 008]. This coolant cannot be reused as it will run down the A/C hoses and oil filter and get contaminated. If you are not careful it will make a mess. If you need to let air into the system, remove the sensor in the top radiator hose; green #2 in pic [CCH DIY 008].

Step Two: Remove the Passenger Side Sound Panel [TBWP DIY 004 thru 006]. These metal disks (004-1 and 005-1) should not be pulled off or you will break the plastic clips that hold them into place; I used a flat screw driver and turned it, as if it was a bolt/nut. Slow process but it worked. The Screw in (006-1) is a T-20.

Step Three: Remove the Turbo Inlet Tube [TBWP DIY 007 thru 013]. Loosen the tube clamp (007-1) and the support bolt (007-2). The light blue square shows you one of the sound panel disks. You need to place an oil pan under the Intercooler, because when you remove the clamp (010-1) and break the hose seal, oil (011) is going to pour our of the Intercooler. I have read several articles on how much is too much oil in an intercooler and none had a firm recommendation. So the average that I came up with is, no more than a pint. Pic (013) shows what the inside of the metal tubing looks like; it is fairly clean, but coated with oil, because you can see it settling at the bottom.
 

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No NB Yellow Trifecta :(
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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Step Four: Remove the Inner Plastic Guard from the passenger wheel well [TBWP DIY 016 thru 021]. The are a Ga-Zillon T-20 screws here. Be sure and put them in a ziploc bag so you do not loose them. Pic (021) shows you the lower crank pulley, A/C Compressor and Serpentine belt.

Step Five: Remove the Serpentine Belt Tensioner (Yellow Square). You will need either a large adjustable wrench, vice grips or pliers to release the serpentine tensioner and a 3mm allen wrench to use a locking pin; I used a twelve inch adjustable wrench. Pic [TBWP DIY 022] shows you were the wrench goes (Yellow Circle). Place the wrench on the tensioner [TBWP DIY 023] and pull the wrench toward the front of the car. There is a small "brownish squiggly" line in pic [TBWP DIY 023]; this shows you how far back you have to go, to get the locking pin holes lined up.

Pic [TBWP DIY 024] shows you the VW Special Tool 3090 (Tensioner Locking Tool); once you have the tensioner locked you can remove the serpentine belt. You will need to disconnect the air intake tube (Green Circle in pic [TBWP DIY 023]) from the intake manifold before you can get the tensioner out.

Pic [TBWP DIY 025] shows you the three bolts that have to be removed to get the tensioner out (Yellow Circles). The thrid bolt is actually under the hose and hard to see. The bolt that is visible and near 025-3 is not a tensioner bolt; it is an alternator bolt. Be sure that you do not lose the hose clamp that mounts on the outside of the tensioner.

Pics [TBWP DIY 026 thru 028] show the tensioner after it has been removed from the car and pic [TBWP DIY 029] shows you what it looks like with the tensioner removed.

Step Six: Remove the Expansion Tank. That DIY is here ...
 

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No NB Yellow Trifecta :(
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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Step Seven: Remove the Upper Timing Belt Cover [TBWP DIY 030 thru 033]. The upper timing belt cover is plastic, so when you are removing it take care so you do not crack it or you will be buying a new one. There are two clips that hold the cover onto the cylinder head [TBWP DIY 030]; the front clip (yellow square) and the rear clip [TBWP DIY 031]. You will need to disconnect the wire harness for the vacuum sensor (green oval [TBWP DIY 030]) and the vacuum hose (Blue Rectangle). The cover does not come out easily either; some wiggling will be necessary. Pic [TBWP DIY 032] shows you the Timing Belt Cover removed from the car and pic [TBWP DIY 033] shows you the cam sprocket and the upper portion of the timing belt.

Step Eight: Install the Motor Support. I am fortunate, because I have an Engine Support Bridge [TBWP DIY 034]. The weight of the engine must be supported because the passenger side engine mount is removed in Step 9.

WARNING: Regardless of the method that you chose to use to support the engine weight, remember it must be flexible enough to pitch the motor up and down WITHOUT DAMAGING the motor, drivers side motor mount and above all YOU! :scared:

Step Nine: Remove the Passenger Side Frame Mount [TBWP DIY 035 thru 037].

WARNING: DO NOT loosen any frame/motor mount bolts until the engine weight is supported! :eek:hnoes: Also DO NOT RE-USE Frame/Motor Mount Bolts, as there are "Stretch Bolts"; which means that the bolt heads have a tendency to snap off when re-torqued back down. Consider them all one time use and replace them.

Remove Bolts 035-1 and 035-2 first [TBWP DIY 035]; this will disconnect the motor mount from the frame mount. Be aware that your engine may move slightly when these two bolts are released/removed. Remove the remaining bolts 035-3 thru 035-6 [TBWP DIY 035 and 036]. Pic [TBWP DIY 037] shows you the frame motor mount after it has been removed from the car.

Step Ten: Remove the Motor Mount [TBWP DIY 038 thru 0??]. This is the first of two difficult steps, as it is a multi-step process. The first sub-step is to remove the Upper Motor Mount Bolt [TBWP DIY 038 thru 041]. You will need to pitch the motor up in order to get the socket into the motor mount hole [TBWP DIY 040]; you will also need an extension bar to break the torque on the bolt; I used the Lug Nut Wrench to slide over the handle of a 3/8 ratchet.

Motor Mount Bolt Part Numbers
Upper Mount to Frame: (x2) N90596906 Cost $9.83 Each
Upper Mount to Lower Mount: (x2) N10209605 Cost $6.51 Each
Lower Mount to Engine Block: (x2) N90712403 Cost $5.25 Each and (x1) N10328002 Cost $6.53 Each
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Step Ten (Continued): Here are the multi-part steps prior to removing the lower motor mount ...

1) Remove the Crank Serpentine Pulley. (We will put this back on to get the timing marks lined up in Step Eleven.)
2) Remove the Lower Timing Belt Cover.
3) Remove the Turbo Air Intake Tube.

Step Ten-One: Remove the Crank Pulley [TBWP DIY 042 THRU 047]. You will need two ratchets/sockets; one to prevent the lower crank from turning while you loosen the Crank Pulley Bolts and the other get the crank pulley bolts out.

Warning: :eek:hnoes: The four Crank Pulley Nuts are allen heads and IMHO they are soft and easy to strip; so be extra careful when breaking the torque. As you can see from the pic I have replaced two already.

Part Number
Crank Pulley Bolts (x4) N10303607 Cost $2.95 Each

Do not worry about putting the crank pulley back on properly, as there are three check points to ensure that you do it correctly [TBWP DIY 043-1 and 043-2] and bolt points 1 and 4. The crank pulley has two alignment holes, 043-1 and 043-2; there is a dimple on the crank sprocket which is meant to line up with 043-1 and I scratched the surface of crank sprocket 043-2. Which you can see in pic [TBWP DIY 044 and 045]. Also if you look at the crank pulley mount holes you will notice that 1 and 4 are not evenly spaced. So if you try to put the crank pulley back on incorrectly, one of the these three points will not be lined up.

Pics [TBWP DIY 046 and 047] show you the timing marks that will be used when we align the crank and cam at TDC (Top Dead Center) prior to removing the timing belt. Ensure that you clean the crank pulley and crank pulley cover so you can mark these points where they can be seen.

... it will also be necessary to adjust the engine pitch up and down so you can get the Ratchet/Socket into the lower motor mount holes. The most challenging part will be getting the lower mount out. There are two possibilities; from the top or bottom. I have yet to get it out through the top, but I have successfully got it out through the bottom twice and I have those pics.

Step Ten-Two: Remove the Lower Timing Belt Cover. There are three bolts [TBWP DIY 048] and they are easy to remove. Be sure that you use the proper torque on these bolts when putting this cover back on so they do not come loose.

Warning: Also make note that the lower timing belt cover is on top of the lower crank pulley cover. If you put the lower timing belt cover on first it will rub the timing belt edge and that is a bad thing. :scared:

Pics [TBWP DIY 051 and 052] shows you the lower timing belt cover removed from the car.

Pic [TBWP DIY 053] shows you the parts that you are going replace; Tensioner, Idler Roller, Water Pump and Timing Belt.

Step Ten-Three: Remove Turbo Air Intake Tube [TBWP DIY 055 thru 058]. The only issue with this step is the heat shield that is wrapped around the rubber hose; the hose it self has your basic hose squeeze clamps.

Caution: The heat shield may be brittle and if you use to much force to unsnap the snaps you might tear the heat shield; which means you will be buying a new, like me. :banghead:

The heat shield has two snaps, [TBWP DIY 055 and 056] like those you would find on a pair of blue-jeans and they are a pain to unsnap. Now if your NB is as old as mine the squeeze clamps may have poked holes [TBWP DIY 057] through the heat shield; which makes more difficult to get the heat shield to slide off of tube. Pic [TBWP DIY 058] shows you what it looks like with the tube removed.
 

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No NB Yellow Trifecta :(
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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Step Ten (Finally): Remove the Motor Mount [TBWP DIY 060 thru 063]. Lower Motor Mount Bolt 060-1 is in a tight spot; you will need to adjust the pitch (up/down) of the engine to give yourself enough space to work with. I used a fixed swivel ratchet to break the torque on this bolt. Bolt 060-2 is all to easy. Now getting the lower motor mount out is tricky; pic [TBWP DIY 062] shows you the route to take to get it out. You will have to make a few twists and turns; it will come out and go back in this way. Pic [TBWP DIY 063] shows you what it looks like with the lower motor mount removed and pic [TBWP DIY 064] shows you the lower motor mount removed from the car.

Step Ten (Completed): Put the Crank Pulley Back on; you do not have to torque down the mounting bolts, just snug them.

Step Eleven: Set the Timing [TBWP DIY 070 thru 074]. I strongly suggest that you take pictures of your current timing setting [TBWP DIY 070 and 072]; reason being is this, your NB was running with this current setting. I made sure the CAM Sprocket [TBWP DIY 070] is set to TDC, then I checked the Crank Pulley Setting; rarely is it at TDC and that is because timing belts stretch. So with the CAM at TDC, you now know the timing variance range [TBWP DIY 073] (Orange Lines) for the Crank Pulley. Ideally you want the CAM and Crank Pulley timing marks to be at TDC with the new timing belt.

Step Eleven: Optional - After some conversation with Dave regarding marking the old belt with timing marks and using it to annotate the new belt, you can; however IMHO it is not a method I would use. Basically here is what you do ... Set the CAM to TDC and annotate the Old Belt where the TDC mark is at, then find the Crank Pulley Mark and annotate the Engine Block, Crank Cover Plate and Crank Sprocket. Remove the Crank Sprocket Cover Plate and annotate the Crank Mark on the Old Belt. Count the number of belt teeth between the CAM and Crank marks and annotate that number on the belt.

Warning: I cannot stress this enough an INCORRECT TIMING SETTING can cost you, check out this Thread Post ...

Step Twelve: Release the Tension on the Tensioner and Timing Belt [TBWP DIY 075 thru 079]. To perform this step you need the following VW Special Tools; T10092 (M5x55 or M5x60 8mm Bolt) and T40011 (2mm Allen Wrench). Thread the bolt (T10092) into the top of the Idler Roller Bracket and ensure that the large washer [TBWP DIY 075A] is on top of the Tensioner Lever [TBWP DIY 077]. Place the Allen Wrench (T40011) into the hole on the front side of the Idler Roller Housing [TBWP DIY 077] and as you thread in the bolt (T10092), push in slightly on the allen wrench (T40011) until you feel it connect or slide into place; ensure that the locking pin slides all the way through to the other side Step 14 [TBWP DIY 087].

You need to remove the Crank Pulley Cover before you can remove the Idler Roller and Timing Belt.
 

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Ok I'm watching the process and progress.

Is there an easy way to check the timing belt to see if it is in bad shape? I have questions on if the belt has been done on my recently acquired NB.
 

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No NB Yellow Trifecta :(
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ok I'm watching the process and progress.

Is there an easy way to check the timing belt to see if it is in bad shape? I have questions on if the belt has been done on my recently acquired NB.
You can remove the upper timing belt cover for a visual inspection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Technical Note: Be sure you mark TDC on the Crank Sprocket, as this will help you when checking the timing after installing the new timing belt.

Step Thirteen: Remove the Crank Pulley Cover [TBWP DIY 082]. Remove bolts 082-1 and 082-2. Pic [TBWP DIY 083] shows you what the engine looks like with the Crank Pulley Cover removed; you can also see the slack in the timing belt.

Step Fourteen: Remove the Timing Belt [TBWP DIY 084]. Grab the belt on both sides, about 2-3 inches from the Crank Sprocket; then pulling it slowly toward you, using a wiggle to work it off of the Crank Sprocket.

Technical Note: If you prefer a quicker belt removal method, cut it off; just remember if you need to reset your timing marks, a used belt goes back on easier than a new belt.

Step Fifteen: Remove the Idler Roller [TBWP DIY 085]. Remove Special Tool T10092 (Green Square) from the Idler Roller. There are two bolts (Yellow Circles) that hold the Idler Roller to the block. Pics [TBWP DIY 086 and 087] shows you what the Idler Roller looks like removed from the car.

Step Sixteen: Remove the Tensioner [TBWP DIY 085, 088 and 089]. Pic [TBWP DIY 089] shows you what the Tensioner looks like removed from the car.

Step Seventeen: Remove the Water Pump [TBWP DIY 085, 090 thru 092]. Be careful when removing the water pump from the block; pull it gently and slowly as there may still be coolant in the block [TBWP DIY 091]. Pic [TBWP DIY 092] shows you why I did this DIY.

Step Eighteen: Clean the Block Surface before installing any new parts [TBWP DIY 093 and 094]. Pay special attention to the edge surface where the water pump goes. If the surface is not smooth the o-ring WILL NOT Seat properly and you will be following this DIY yet again. I had to do it twice. :banghead:

Step Nineteen: Install New Tensioner, New Idler Roller and New Water Pump.
 

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No NB Yellow Trifecta :(
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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
Warning Technical Note: Steps Twenty and Twenty-One are "Loop Steps"; which means that you may be taking the new belt off and putting it back on more than once to get the timing marks to line up correctly. Also, be aware that the inner edge of the timing belt may get damaged (frayed) if you perform the steps below to many times.

Technical Note: Be sure that the Special Tool T10092 is in place to Set and Release the Tensioner. The Tensioner should be Released to install the timing belt and Set to tension the timing belt.

Warning: DO NOT Use Tools to pry the belt on! :scared: This will stretch the belt improperly, shortening its life expectancy. All I used were my hands/fingers and it was challenging to get it on.

Warning: The crank sprocket may move when putting the new belt on, so you MUST Maintain your timing settings while putting the new belt on. :eek:hnoes:

Step Twenty: Put the New Timing Belt on [TBWP DIY 100]. I put the belt on the CAM Sprocket first, then around the Tensioner, Water Pump and finally the Idler Roller; which left the hard part, getting it on the Crank Sprocket. After the belt is on, set the Tensioner (Special Tool T10092); when the tensioner begins to apply tension to the timing belt you will see the Crank Sprocket slowly rotate clockwise. **So, if you turned the Crank Sprocket Counter-Clockwise 1/2 to 1 Tooth, your timing should be lined up or *within the desired range.

Step Twenty: Optional - If you performed the Optional Step Eleven, here is where you use that Information. Overlay the Old Belt (edge to edge not front to back) onto the New Belt and annotate the timing marks onto the New Belt, ensuring that the teeth count is the same on the New Belt between the two timing marks. When you go to install the new belt, ensure that one mark lines up with the CAM TDC and the other mark lines up with the Crank Sprocket mark; these are the marks that you made in Optional Step Eleven.

Step Twenty-One: Checking the Timing Marks ... Put the Crank Sprocket Cover and Crank Pulley back on and hand crank the engine 8 to 10 times; that means putting your best socket and ratchet on the Crank Bolt and turning the motor over. Doing this gives the Tensioner a chance to tension the entire belt, and it is possible that your timing marks may not be aligned or within the desired range afterwards.

Perfect Timing means that the CAM (Step Eleven [TBWP DIY 070]) and Crank (Step Eleven [TBWP DIY 072]) are set for TDC (Top Dead Center) ... THIS IS THE SETTING YOU ARE STRIVING FOR.

However, Proper Timing means that the CAM is at TDC and the Crank Alignment Mark is *within the range (Step Eleven [TBWP DIY 073]) that is in the picture that I strongly suggested that you take in Step Eleven.

Caution Technical Note: **Also, depending on the quality of your new timing belt, it is possible that you might have to turn the Crank Counter Clockwise more than 1 Sprocket Tooth [TBWP DIY 100].

That is it! You are Done! :banana: Well sort of, all you have to do is put it all back together now. Simply reverse the steps.
 

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Thanks for all the help by documenting everything. Now to hunt down all the tools, jack stands, and all the other odds and ends to get the job done!

Step eighteen - should that say "not seat"?

Again thanks!


02SilverSport?Sent from my iPad using Autoguide
 

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good diy

Good job on this diy D2beetle, I already did my timing belt this past december but will sure come back to read this diy when it comes back to do it again next time, 90k miles or 3 years from now...LOL :D

thanks again
julian
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks for all the help by documenting everything. Now to hunt down all the tools, jack stands, and all the other odds and ends to get the job done!

Step eighteen - should that say "not seat"?

Again thanks!


02SilverSport?Sent from my iPad using Autoguide
Yes, you are right, :) thanks; I made the correction and underlined it. I proof read so many times, that I "insert words" even though I do not write them.


Good job on this diy D2beetle, I already did my timing belt this past december but will sure come back to read this diy when it comes back to do it again next time, 90k miles or 3 years from now...LOL :D

thanks again
julian
Anytime ... :D
 

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Yes, you are right, :) thanks; I made the correction and underlined it. I proof read so many times, that I "insert words" even though I do not write them.
You have got some great tips on the site! I wish I had the skills and tools, or a good buddy near by that a few bucks and a case or two of their favorite beer after the job was done!???
 

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Nice job. You spent as much time (or more) on the DIY write up as you did on the job. :)

Only things I would add that helped me was to pull the passenger headlight and support unit out for easier access and to reef clockwise a bit on the cam sprocket to free up a little belt length to slide it over the water pump. I could not do it otherwise.

Thanks.
 

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Wow, I remember that job about 80 000 km ago... Nice job on the write up. I remember it all very clearly from your photos, and I vowed I wouldn't do it again.

But maybe, having done it before, and with this excellent guide... who knows?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
You have got some great tips on the site! I wish I had the skills and tools, or a good buddy near by that a few bucks and a case or two of their favorite beer after the job was done!??????
... :D Will Work for St Pauli Girl's :D ... Thanks ...



Nice job. You spent as much time (or more) on the DIY write up as you did on the job. :)

Only things I would add that helped me was to pull the passenger headlight and support unit out for easier access and to reef clockwise a bit on the cam sprocket to free up a little belt length to slide it over the water pump. I could not do it otherwise.

Thanks.
Thanks and I am still trying to perfect my methods for getting the timing where I want it the first time around.



Wow, I remember that job about 80 000 km ago... Nice job on the write up. I remember it all very clearly from your photos, and I vowed I wouldn't do it again.

But maybe, having done it before, and with this excellent guide... who knows?
Yep, that is what I said the first time and look at me now! :D Thanks ...
 

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What I need to know is the secret for getting the motor mount back in position after the belts are all set. Everything else is cake. This job ranks right up there with dual disk clutch change in a 928

Carlos
 
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