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I have over 96k miles on my 2.0 liter gas new beetle. I need to replace the timing belt but I am squeemish about taking on that job. Is this a job best left to the dealer? If I do it myself is the factory manual an absolute must?

Thanks!
 

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a.k.a. porkchopzz4
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890 Posts
accmeint said:
I have over 96k miles on my 2.0 liter gas new beetle. I need to replace the timing belt but I am squeemish about taking on that job. Is this a job best left to the dealer? If I do it myself is the factory manual an absolute must?
I've got my parts and am just waiting for a few days off in a row to tackle this. I would say a Bentley manual would be essential... ECS's timing kit that includes everything you need except G12 coolant and motor mount stretch bolts is like $155 for the 2.0L. And a Bentley is $50. So, get some price quotes, subtract the $250 or so it will cost you out of pocket and decide if the difference is or is not what your time is worth. :)

I like doing all my own stuff myself and taking it somewhere else is not an option for me. For one, I'm cheap. And for two, I know I'll do it right. And if I break something, well... education is expensive. But I seldom make the same mistake twice. :p
 

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2008 "Fowvay" yellow NB
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Me too!

I'm about to tackle this job next weekend for my 1.8T that has about 72K miles. I'm so sqeemish about it I have enlisted the able help of several friends. 2 heads are better than one. 3 heads should be better than 2 so...

Good luck.

The DIY is gonna save me like $400 that I don't have. Gotta do it.
 

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2.5L 5 Cyl. killer bunny
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575 Posts
Taking the car apart is the easy part...The main thing to worry about is when you actually go to set the timing belt. Making sure all of the gears and timing stuff is in order. It takes two people to do it, but if you have a lot of patience, it is well worth the time in effort.
 

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my VWoA certified tech in Durham quoted me about $250 for a timing belt + water pump replacement. Remember that you gotta replace the water pump at the same time, as it's going to go out shortly after 100k like the belt! I'd check a reputable VW mechanic in the area as well as the dealer.
 

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Future Buddha
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kcfoxie said:
I'd check a reputable VW mechanic in the area as well as the dealer.
I agree with KC Foxie. You sound unsure of your ability to complete the task so I would take it to a qualified professional if I were you. They have the tools and the experience.
 

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I wish I had a shop
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Holy Toledo Batman! The stealership in Greenville,SC wants $650 to replace the timing belt/tensioner and the waterpump. While I don't want to replace the timing belt myself, how hard is it to replace the water pump. I need to flush the coolant system anyhow.
 

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a.k.a. porkchopzz4
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890 Posts
Only you can make the decision on whether or not tackling this job is right for you.

But here are some questions to ask yourself:

1. Do I understand what "timing" is and why it is important?
2. Do I have a good assortment of tools (or do I use a screwdriver as a hammer and a pry bar?)
3. Do I have the patience of Job?
4. Can my car be down for a few days/weeks if I need to order more parts or to replace parts I break once I get started?

I have a reasonable amount of confidence in my abilities, I have lots of tools and a closed in garage to work in - however, I do worry that something "else" might need to be replaced once I get started. Therefore, I will probably do this job on my next vacation week. I'll start it the weekend prior so that if I need to order something, the car can sit for a few days while I wait on the UPS guy.

I know noR mentioned it took him a while because he only had time after work to do the job....

So I think the following things are most important:

1. time
2. tools
3. patience

:)
 

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Yep, I have to agree w/ya porkchop. Time is probably the biggest. Keep in mind, "you might break something and have to replace it" ... Which means ordering parts and waiting for their arrival. That's a biggie. The tools necessary aren't anything special, but you'll still probably need a good assortment of regular tools. There's just no 'special vw tool 1553241-4 required'. :p


noR
 

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a.k.a. porkchopzz4
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noR said:
Yep, I have to agree w/ya porkchop. Time is probably the biggest. Keep in mind, "you might break something and have to replace it" ... Which means ordering parts and waiting for their arrival. That's a biggie. The tools necessary aren't anything special, but you'll still probably need a good assortment of regular tools. There's just no 'special vw tool 1553241-4 required'. :p


noR
The reason I mention tools is having a good assortment of sockets (deep well, regular, 12 pt, 6pt) plus different extensions, wrenches etc can really help since it seems nothing is ever designed to be worked on - it's designed to be assembled quickly by machines or unskilled labor with no thought put into taking it all apart later. ;)
 

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I wish I had a shop
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well talked to the local redneck shop in town. $384 for parts and labor... I can swallow that a lot better than the stealerships 650, and while it is one of those rundown redneck looking joints, I know of one other beetle that had their timing belt/water pump replaced about 6 months ago and something about how there are always cars being fixed there. The dude must be pretty good to get the constant stream of vehicles there.
 
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