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I just finished a post here Custom Ford Lights: Smoked Tail Lights - How and Where to Do It detailing the different options available for anyone considering tinting their head lights and taillights.

In short, I broke it down to the three possible ways to tint your lights (this assumes you think it's a good idea to do at all of course so I'm putting all legal and stylistic questions to the side):

1. Using sprays/paints
2. Using films
3. Using complete aftermarket replacements.

I go a little further in the post and discuss the benefits and disadvantages of each but since writing it I have been wondering if anyone has any other ways to achieving the same end. I mean, can you tint with Plasti-dip? I've never used the stuff so I don't know but I'm throwing this out there to get feedback and see if I've missed anything. Anyway, thanks for reading and have a great weekend!
 

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As a former motor vehicle inspector:

Do NOT tint headlights/taillights without first checking with your local and state regulations. When I did legal inspections several years ago for this state? ANY covering on headlights was an automatic fail. And yes I've had my share of *issed off customers to the shop I work at all say the same thing: The parts guy at the local supply house said these where 'street legal'.

The parts guy is there to sell parts, not to inspect your car. Check first to ensure you won't get a ticket or a failed inspection. Same goes for window tint. Many states have strict rules about the percentage of tint that can be applied.

S-
 

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Plus i hate coming up behind idiots at night who have pretty much blacked out.....or tinted as they like to call it their tail lights and you can not see them at all.
 

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2 or 3 coats of vht night shades. Passed nys inspection with flying colors. Never been pulled over because of lights and when I was they didn't say anything.
 

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I'm down with tinted tail lights if they are done properly. I tinted my tails using several thin coats of Rustoleum tint, wet sanding each layer in between so I got a deep yet very clear look that let a lot of light pass through. The turn signals and brake lights were very bright and clear. Whenever I wash the car I use regular cleaner wax and put a high shine on the taillights. Where many people go wrong is when they just slather it on in thick layers. I later on changed the look up so it would match the front end better.

I can't see any good reason to tint headlights unless it's a show car or something that will never see regular night driving.
 

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375-12A/B1 EXCESSIVE TINT ON WINDSHEILD $80 $58 $138 $130
375-12A/B3 EXCESS TINT-REAR/SIDE WINDOWS $80 $58 $138 $130
375-12A/B4 EXCESSIVE REAR WINDOW TINT $80 $58 $138 $130
375-12A1 FRONT WINSHIELD NON-TRANSPARENT $80 $58 $138 $130
375-12A2 TINTED SIDE WINDOWS $80 $58 $138 $130
375-12A3 REAR SIDE WINDOWS TINTED $80 $58 $138 $130
375-12A4 EQUIP VIOLATION-SAFETY GLASS $80 $58 $138 $130
375-12AB2 TINTED SIDE WINDOWS $80 $58 $138 $130

375-4 TINTED HEADLIGHTS $80 $58 $138 $130

The above is the fine list and surcharges for tinted windows and headlights. This applies for Nassau County. I wasn't trying to be a jerk about my comments, just saying CHECK your local laws and to be careful.

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Plus i hate coming up behind idiots at night who have pretty much blacked out.....or tinted as they like to call it their tail lights and you can not see them at all.
If you are involved in an accident and there is the slightest possible link to tinted lights being the cause (rear-ended because your brake lights are tinted, for example), not only may your insurance company give you the boot (and not pay out), but you could face criminal charges of negligence and/or reckless driving or tampering with safety equipment (one could go on…).

There is nothing safe, legal or smart about reducing the light output of headlights or taillights on road-going vehicles.
 

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There is for each county/state set guidelines about the how bright the tail lights have to be. Basically they state for example: Tail Light/Brake Light needs to be clear and viewable from a distance of xxx feet from car/truck. I'm currently at work, so I can't verify it, but I think it was at least 600 feet?

Headlight tinting is clearly ILLEGAL in most states and counties. Tinting tail lights can create a huge mess as already mentioned. Why take the risk? You want something BRIGHT! so the idiots behind you can see you're STOPPING!! (Normally I'm the idiot that needs that bright light to catch the attention. Tinting the tail lights might make me think you've got your fog lights/running lights on, and not stopping!)

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I like a light coating of tint on the taillights. Just enough to be noticeable but not enough to really decrease light output.

But tinting headlights? Why? You want to keep the best light output, tinting is exactly opposite of that. To me that's just as bad as letting your headlights haze over to a translucent finish.
 
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