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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Dear forum members,

First time poster and new owner. My NB is a 2005 GLS 1.8T automatic. It was supposed to have 17 inch wheels coming from the factory, but at some point (who knows when), it got 16 inch wheels put on.

The problem is the tire pressure label on the driver doorjamb is for 17" (front 30 psi and rear 39).

The question is what is the correct pressure for my model with 16" wheels? Car has Michelin Energy 205/55R16 tires.

I had to take it in for service on something else and asked the service department folks, but they only gave me one "average" number and didn't want to look up the info. Even after I insisted there are different numbers for front and back. VW customer care line couldn't tell me either.

So I thought I would ask here, since someone with the same model could simply look at their own label, or if they are sufficiently obsessive, just recite the numbers!

VW designed the vehicle a certain way and specifies certain values for a reason, so an average or guess would seem to be beside the point.

Many thanks.
 

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The sticker for my 05 NB TDI with 16 inch wheels says 34 front, 39 rear.

The sticker for my 04 NBC with 1.8T and 16 inch wheels says 33 front, 39 rear.

I suspect the high rear number is to cover the case when you have 4 people and luggage in the rear.
 

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Oh and by the way. You can order the correct sticker. In fact, if you see one on another car, the part number is printed on it. I had to do this. It was about $1.
 

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Tire pressures

For my 99 1.8 turbo GLS and 16" alloy wheels, the VW recommended tire pressure for around town is 26 to 28 rear and 28 to 30 front. If more load is added and a higher speed is used, the recommended rear pressure jumps up to 30 to 35 psi depending on just how much load you have added. The 35 psi is for a max load. The front pressure is raised to 30 to 32 if more load and high speed is used and just 30 to 32 if high prolonged speed is observed.
Of course this is only an approximation and the only real and acurate means of properly inflating tires is to observe the tire foot print. The entire width of the tread should be contacting the pavement. Observe how the tires wear. If they wear in the center, than you are running too much pressure. If they are wearing at the outside edges only, too little air.
Becareful not to use too high a pressure as this can cause abnormal handeling due to improper tread contact... JK
 
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