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Discussion Starter · #81 · (Edited)
Hey, I have not resolved my problem (have not pulled the trans yet); the theory, at this point... is that when I had the 5th/6th fork welded, that it go slightly warped. I am assuming; that this caused the stiffness/binding, in 5th/6th. I bought a new fork from my VW dealer, just need to pull the trans and do the swap.

Having gone through all this brain damage myself: this is what I would recommend doing:

1. weld/bolt the shift forks (I would do them all; your in there, go ahead and eliminate the weak areas): they also, sell the metal ones 1st/2nd, 3rd/4th (USP Motorsports/APTuning), really depends on what you are going to do with the car and if you are going to upgrade the performance to higher levels, how aggressive you are when shifting (racing, track days, fasting shifting daily driving, etc.) but steel, is stronger then the brass/steel. Anything can be broken but the steel forks, would be less failure prone.

2. Install ARP differential nuts/bolts: go ahead, drill out the rivets and replace them (with bolts), even if you don't put a limited slip differential in your trans (e.g. Wavetrac/Quaife/Peloquin). This is another primary weak point; I would go with the ARP bolts, they are cheaper then official VW ones anyway.

3. Replace clutch/flywheel/throw out bearing et. al. (the whole enchilada): you are in there and would rather then go through pulling the trans in the future. If you have the money and the clutch is worn, it is probably worth replacing it. If money is tight; you check the DMF for play and everything looks ok, you could probably get away with reusing it but you are most likely, going to have to replace it, at some point soon anyway (sooner, rather then later).

OPTIONS:

A. performance aftermarket: while stronger, can give you allot of problems, that I am still dealing with (hard to get into gear, grinding etc.); I would advise against it, the NLS shim has helped allot of people but has not cured everyone's problems. I am running a SouthBend setup: after what I have experienced, I don't know if I would recommend it. There is strong anecdotal evidence; to suggest, that the stock clutch master cylinder/hydraulic system is not up to the task of being able to handle the increased pressure from the performance clutch/pressure plate combos on the market. There are rumors; of a company coming out with a conversion kit, that converts everything over to a early steel master cylinder from a earlier VW that can handle the pressure and solve the problem. Others, say it isn't a problem and use the NLS shim kit or find other problems, that seem to contribute the issue (too much play in the input shaft, bad clutch disks, failed hydraulics, poor/wrong clearance with p/p, incorrectly bled systems, etc.); the explanations and possibilities, seem to be endless.

B. Stock level clutch/smf conversion kit by the respected OEM company VALEO: all the parts are made by them and it is a affordable kit, they designed some features to absorb some of the sounds/shock that the original DMF was supposed to (flywheel, PP, Disk, throw out bearing etc). I don't know anyone personally; who has used this kit but it is a affordable option, I have heard good things about the kit for the 5 speed 02J. I cannot guarantee; that you won't have problems but I would think they would have better R&D then South Bend, you never know, until you try.

C. Stock clutch: keeping the DMF, quieter, potentially failure prone but the prices have come down.... go with the OEM LUK brand, if you go that route. I would think about the future and if you are going to get performance stage upgrades or bigger turbos etc. This is the STOCK system; so, you would most likely, not have any shifting problems, that the performance aftermarket systems seem to be having. I have seriously; considered, pitching my SouthBend setup and going back to stock, be done with the problems.

D. stainless steel clutch line; it is a cheap upgrade to have one made, I would do it (I posted all the info you need to have one made; any hydraulic shop should be able to do it for you). You can also; buy it from USP Motorsports.

4. TOOLS:

A. Phoenix Systems reverse bleeder kit:
It works excellent and I really recommend you buy one and use it to bleed the system, which can be hard to bleed fully.

5. Have the whole transmission; looked over, by a trusted professional when it is apart and pay particular attention to the bearings and the 1st and 2nd syncros, as they are a common wear area. My bearings; were scored by particles from the fork and grinding the gears.

A. Use Genuine VW gear oil; seems to work the best and hopefully, will give you trans-axle a long life, less gear grinding with the VW oil. This can be up for debate but from all the research, I have done... seems to be a safe way to go and anecdotal evidence seems to suggest the least amount of grinding gears.

If you have anymore questions; let me know and feel free, to ask anything about the repair. I spent a ton of time and effort on this; so, I'll tell you my unvarnished opinion about what I experienced and while I am not a professional tech, I have gone through the repair process. These are all my personal opinions but I hope, that they would be of help from one who has "been there", as it were. As with anything, take everything with a grain of salt, your mileage may vary... blah, blah, blah! I do hope that everyone with these problems, finds the best solution and hope my info, will be helpful in repairing their trans, try to built one that will hold up to use and be reliable in the future.

The 02M six speed; is a great transmission but it does have its weakness, the key is to fix the weak areas and do your best to make it strong! :)

PS: for the problems that people are dealing with on the performance clutches and possible solutions; check out these threads:

02M whining decel noises, aftermarket clutch disengagement issues, mainshaft axial play
VWVortex.com - 02M whining decel noises, aftermarket clutch disengagement issues, mainshaft axial play

NLS shim kit:
VWVortex.com - NLS 02M clutch shim kit now for sale!!

LSD and steel fork review
http://forums.vwvortex.com/showthre...eviews-Peloquin-LSD-and-USP-Steel-Shift-Forks

If you want professional help in the repair or just ship out the whole thing and have a performance rebuild or get good advice on parts, repair options, these guys seem to know their stuff in the VW trans performance industry. There are bound to be others out there but these are the ones, I hear most about (I have not dealt with or have any association with either of them).

APTuning: http://www.aptuning.com/

USP Motorsports: http://www.uspmotorsports.com/
 

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Any consolation I ditched my 2012 Jetta because the 5th gear synchro cracked. 4th one my dealer had seen. Then they reused one time use bolts on the axle. It separated on the highway about 2900 miles later.

Remember to never reuse one time use bolts.
 

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Discussion Starter · #83 · (Edited)
Which transmission are we talking about here? Things definitely break, was the car repaired under warranty? I have been very disappointed with my local dealers repair work and would never go back to them, the only reason I did it was free warranty work. Based upon what my experiences have been; I would request a new transmission from VWOA, versus them trying to repair the existing one (general repair techs at a dealership; don't specialize in this type of work). My situation was similar and like you there was just a lot of incompetence, and the primary problems were never resolved. After my transmission rebuild they did not Torque down the axle nuts; I drove a whole day that way! :) I had a 2000 GLX with the five speed o2j and it had the classic 5 speed, second gear grind problem, it was never fixed right (replaced syncros) and I did a buyback with Volkswagen. I got the 2002 turbo S as replacement; than, the 1st/2nd shifter fork broke years later! Of course; this happened, when I was outside the warranty period. I guess we just can't win! :) Based upon what I've experienced with my Volkswagens; if I had a major transmission problem under warranty, I don't think I would want the car and would ask for another one or request a buyback. I wouldn't want your car either; getting out of it, was probably a good idea. Now, those of us; who own a car; it is paid for and you are essentially stuck with it, repairing the transmission makes sense.
 

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My tranny is now loose from the car. We will take it off and start tearing apart being extra careful. I guess that strengthen all the forks makes sense. Will post my process too.
 

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We just did this "beefing up the forks". This was an easy and cheap task, pulling/installing the tranny itself it was not. Now I have another problem.

My speedo needle/odometer do not work. They remain @ 0. Gas/Tach/Cluster work but these 2 things. Did I broke something? Did I not connected back one sensor? Any help?! 2003 TurboS 02M Tranny code.
 

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Discussion Starter · #86 · (Edited)
Hmmm, did you scan the car for trouble codes? My first thought, would be the speed sensor or other wiring forgot to be connected or damaged a sensor or wiring during the removal/repair process. It is very easy; to forget to put something back on (plug/sensor) or unknowingly damage something, when your yanking on this REALLY hard to get out the 02M!

Scan the car; check all the plugs/wiring and sensors, let us know if you find anything or if any trouble codes, reveal any problems. Speedo clusters; do fail but it seems like coincidence seeing how you just worked on your transmission.

If you have VCDS; you can check the speedo cluster by using out put tests and check the speed sensor is working as well. By the way; did you get a new clutch or just reuse the old one and did you install the differential bolts? :confused: Inquiring minds want to know! :D

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5c4SRoVdojU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zvb70NPIhtc
 

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I kept everything the same. no more mods at this moment. All looked pristine inside!

I wonder if I messed up something INSIDE the tranny, being afraid now that I have to take it off again just to fix this? I did saw my VSS and see it connected properly. Right next to the turbo, foil puch around it. What other sensor could register my speed needle and the trip odometer?
 

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No codes on VCDS were thrown.

It was the VSS sensor. Wiring gave correct readings with the Multimeter, sensor was not...

turns out, this TYPE of sensor, PN 1J919149A, its exclusive for the 6 speed/1.8t combination.

Back of the transmission, below the turbo. Easy to access it using ramps under the vehicle. Inside a foil pouch, 9 mm hex key to get it out.

The inside of the sensor, had a unsoldered resistor.
Here is the part,

Here is the part, sans the outside shell


the small square yellow you see on the green circuit board, came unsoldered on mine. This resistor was not avail at my local store. Since I did not had the 80 bucks on hand to pay for a new sensor, I had this friend of mine get a replacement resistor (same values, different type) and soldered it on the board. A few arrangements and voila! My speedo, trip and non-wobbling gas gauge are in full working order.
 

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Discussion Starter · #90 · (Edited)
Awesome on board repair! That is strange; that there wasn't a trouble code thrown, I guess weirder things have happened! I would not have thought of taking it apart and seeing if you could repair it; I would have assumed it was sealed and bought a new one! I guess it is true what they say: "necessity is the mother of invention"! Excellent repair job; maybe others, can fix theirs in the future! :)

Necessity is the mother of invention - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Looks like the part # is 1J0919149A: all the parts suppliers online; seem to be about $80.

https://www.google.com/search?q=1J9...=210&es_sm=122&ie=UTF-8#q=1J0919149A&start=10
 

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I was able to find one replacement on ebay @ 67 a pop... using a cross-reference part. Still, it was 65$ too much for my pocket.

Yes, no VCDS codes were thrown.
 

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Discussion Starter · #92 · (Edited)
My clutch and or the hydraulics (master/slave) has failed on my car; the trans, will have to come out again. :mad:

Debating on; just going back to a stock clutch and calling it a day, with the continual problems with the South Bend setup. Great clutch; just doesn't seem like the stock clutch hydraulics, can handle the increased pressure plate force, don't really want to but maybe I should just concentrate on a clutch/trans that "works"; rather than a performance clutch, that doesn't work correctly! The other option; is the Valeo clutch kit with the single mass flywheel, haven't heard any issues with those, as the pressure plate/clutch is just a stock replacement and not performance oriented. The stock LUK clutch; would (I assume), be trouble free, aside from the fact that it is a dual mass flywheel. Any feedback welcome! :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #93 · (Edited)
Got the trans out and looked at the clutch for problems; here is the evidence below: definitely, some transfer of material, from the sintered metal side of the disk... the disk was stuck to the flywheel. I'm going to call South Bend Clutch on Monday and see what they say.







[






 

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Discussion Starter · #94 · (Edited)
Couldn't get a hold of Jon @ Southbend today but left a message; about my clutch situation.

Order new clutch, master cylinder and dual mass flywheel from amazon: eta Weds, hopefully back on the road this week! :)

I sure like the performance clutch but I guess I need to stick to a reliable solution that I know will work, for now..

Parts ordered: LUK is the original OEM for VW (says/marked LUK on my old stock parts)

LuK 02-040 Clutch Set

LuK DMF032 Clutch Flywheel

LuK LMC351 Clutch Master Cylinder
 

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Discussion Starter · #95 · (Edited)


The mechanic; cracked the case, looked over the trans and diagnosed, shifting issue; I was having with 5th/6th, turns out one of the added bolts to the 5th/6th shifter fork, was making contact with the case of the trans! Bolt was ground down and clearanced, that seems to have fixed that issue (whew)! This was a step; I was going to do but the mechanic, put the trans back together and in the car, before I mentioned it to him. As with anything; take your time, do it right the first time and if there is a problem, fix it! :)



mark showing; BOLT contact on case


ground down bolt for clearancing the trans case half

(space for pic)

New LUK clutch kit, flywheel, bolts etc.

BOLTS (purchased at my local VW dealer):

" " for flywheel: VW part # N906-650-01 TOOL NEEDED: 12MM 12 POINT or "triple square" BIT SOCKET

" " pressure plate: VW part # N903-6086-07 (look similar to crank/pulley bolts)TOOL NEEDED: 6MM METRIC HEX/ALLEN BIT SOCKET

(NOTE: there are different bolt for the VR6; so get parts/bolts based upon your VIN #)

revisions on parts from stock clutch parts:



a. slave cylinder; has an additional "extension", as opposed to all one piece, assuming this is to make the same part, configurable to other applications without making all new parts for so many cars? Extension, looks like it could be potential area for fluid leaks; over time vs. all one piece. marked LUK part # 510017710



b. new DMF, seems to have (more) play in it; from new vs. my stock used one with 70k or so on it. (I would think the opposite; would be true, but maybe it is binding from wear and not a free moving as the new one?)

c. new DMF, has a thin metal cover on the transmission side and this I think is an improvement, over the stock one, which did not! I would assume; this would keep clutch material/dust/contamination out of the DMF, thus a longer life span? On the other hand; when things wear out, I wonder if it could be a source of annoying noises? I guess; time will tell.



Country of origin of the parts (COO):

1. DMF: Box marked made in HUNGARY, no markings on part.

2. pressure plate/disk/slave cylinder (all in one clutch rep kit): Box marked Made in GERMANY, slave only part marked with Germany, others no COO marks on them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #96 · (Edited)
Another issue; that i had, was when I installed the clutch last time, my Lower Control Arm bushings were totally worn out and destroyed! So, after doing some research; I went with a improved performance and durable solution: BFI poly front bushings and stock heavy duty R32/AUDI TT rear bushings, which are full rubber and do not have the "voids" the normal stock Mark IV ones do.



Upon install; they were both were a improvement over the stock bushings but the BFI poly's squeaked! This has driven me nuts for a long time; after researching the issue and contacting BFI, it turns out you need to lubricate them (before installation) but BFI didn't include any lube or instructions with the part! I assumed you didn't need to; with the "impregnated graphite" marketing etc.; after contacting them, they said you do. So, I bought some Energy prelube 5 from PeP Boys and I am hoping this will cure the issue.



It was pointed out to me; that the grooves/lines, inside the bushings, are to retain the grease! I liberally put the grease, on ALL contact surfaces... we will see if it cures my squeaks! :)

FORMULA 5 Prelube
"Formula 5" Prelube is a versatile, waterproof, non-melting grease. It forms a tough, durable, chemical resistant film of lubricant. Prevents metal-to-metal contact even under severe shock loads. Only a small amount is required to properly lubricate bushings and metal components and to prevent corrosion.
Formula 5 Prelube Grease- 3 quan.
1/2 oz. squirt tubes 9.11110
Formula 5 Prelube Grease- 8 oz. tub 9.11104

http://www.energysuspension.com/uni...jack-strap-control-arm-bushing-half-sets.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #97 · (Edited)

VW part #: 1j0199117AK

MOUNTING BOLT HOLES: 12MM X 1.5 threads

In the process of trying out some new BFI transmission mounts; I ended up stripping out the transmission bracket threads; instead of buying a new or used one... that would strip out AGAIN, I decided to try the TIME SERT brand of steel thread repair kits. These should be in tomorrow; I'll report back how they work out for this particular application (steel bolts, aluminium threads). Some discussions; mention, that if you don't replace stretch bolts, it is not uncommon for them to increase the possibility of stripping out threads... first I have heard of this but I did not replace mine when I swapped out the mount. I may; get some "normal" bolts and see if that helps, while I evaluate my mounts and decide, if I will keep them or not. Much depends on the vibration vs. performance factor, whether I can stand it! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #98 · (Edited)


TIME SERT: thread repair system: from left to right:

1. (top left) steel threaded inserts 2. tap guide 3. counter sink bit 4. thread tap 5. drill bit to remove old threads 6. threaded insert installer tool



First I drilled out old threads, tapped in new threads and used the counter sink bit to finish off the threads, for the steel insert.



Then, I Installed the steel threaded insert; I added red Loctite, for extra security, eliminate any possible movement. The Time Sert system; actually crimps the end of the insert, so that it remains in place. I used the Loctite brand Threadlocker #268, 9g "QuickStix", Red; it has the benefit, of being thick, "non-drip" and staying on the threads, as opposed to the liquid type.

https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=Loctite®+268



Inserts installed; then I took my die grinder and flattened out any part of the insert that way sticking up... repair complete. If it is possible to enjoy repairing threads; this was the case with the TIME SERT system. It is very high quality; complete easy to follow instructions and the repair process, product... "just works", while not inexpensive.... it really is a quality repair solution. I am hoping; that this will be a long lasting repair; this will be a good test of the product, as there is quite a bit of weight/stress put on the transmission bracket. We will see! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #99 · (Edited)
Waited about a day or so; installed the above, repaired transmission bracket, motor mount and torqued the bolts to factory spec (100 nm) and the repair seems solid. As far as I can tell; the threads held firm and the added insurance of the red loctite, is keeping things as they should be.
Moving on to other things; refilling the coolant, bleeding the clutch and repairing the shifter cable ends, the rubber is falling apart inside the bushing. Online; many vendors, sell metal or poly style bushings, I will look around the hardware stores and see if I can make my own, hopefully I can find some brass bushings and maybe some aluminium stock..... fab some up! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #100 · (Edited)
I ended up getting some bushings; from 42 Draft Designs and ran into some fitment issues, they are now, working but I am in communication with 42DD about possible machining problems with them. The bushings had binding problems on the front/back shaft and would not fit at all on the side/side shaft on the shifter cable bracket; I used a rat tail file to (re)"size" the brass inner bearing/insert and got them to work. I finished them; by putting some 3M red scuff pad on the rat tail file and polishing the bearings off. After that, they spun on the shaft, freely without any resistance or binding! Now, there is some variation in the spacing where they sandwich together on the plastic cable ends and that is what I am in communication with 42DD about, we will see if that gets resolved soon! Otherwise, a great product and cheaper, then replacing the cable ends from the dealer, in that case a bulletproof metal solution and cheaper as well! A NO BRAINER; indeed! :)

VW Shifter Bushing Set - Mk4 5/6S MY02-05

Part # 42-455-001 Your Price: $35.00


http://www.42draftdesigns.com/VW-Shifter-Bushing-Set--Mk4-56S-MY02-05_p_279.html

In the process of lubing my passenger side lower control arm poly bushings; I knocked the cv joint out of place in the drive shaft! So I had to take it apart; I used the opportunity to replace the cv boot and lube it up, put it all back together again! All is well; I ended up using the OEM GKN LOBRO boot kit. Looks like the other boots could use replacement as well; I contacted GKN and they gave me the correct part numbers for the the kits, I am looking online... for a good source for these excellent replacement cv boot kits (they look pretty much identical to the original VW parts: as GKN supplies the axles to VW at the factory).

GKN/Lobro

Home - GKN Driveline

You can lookup; parts for you car here:

Home - www.gknservice.com - GKN Aftermarkets & Services

In my case; I couldn't find the correct cv boot part number in their online catalog; so I contacted them. The GKN German based tech support, responded to my parts request in a couple of days and gave me this info (I gave them year, model, engine code, trans code and my VIN #):

The CV axles are:
Left side - OE 1J0 407 451 PX – Löbro 304351
Right side - OE 1J0 407 452 QX - Löbro 303927

The CV joints are:
Wheel Left/right side - OE 1J0 498 099 E – Löbro 303551
Gear box side - OE 1J0 498 103 E – Löbro #

The CV Boots are:
Wheel Left/right side - OE 3B0 498 203E – Löbro 303552
Gear box side - OE 1J0 498 201 E - Löbro 304113
 
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