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Discussion Starter #1
Hi folks, in the last few weeks my wife's 2006 2.5L Beetle has been kicking out a few codes along with the engine check light coming on . I cleared the first codes to see if they were flukes, and they seemed to stay off but returned ever couple of days of driving. The Beetle performed fine while the first codes came on with check light on until today, the car now is hard to drive as in engine is missing and lacks power until we getup to a around 35mph and baby the throttle. Any way the codes when read pertained to many things in faults but 75% pertain to the upstream O2 sensor bank 1.
The first codes were P2414, and then the same with P2626 showing up. Today the codes were P0303 and P0300.
So with that said I started to look for a decent priced Upstream O2 sensor to start with to see if the problem goes away. Yes they are not cheap and they also are hard to fine the upstream sensor. So with all this said someone maybe point me to a decent priced sensor that maybe you found with the same problem that with fit this year and engine. Got to start somewhere, I appreciate any help on this, thanks.

Codes

P2414
P2626
P0303
P0300
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Today I ran some more test and got a new code P0305 (Cly. 5 miss).
Have to ask will a bad O2 cause all this missing on any cylinder just by whatever it happens to be?
Hear is the screen shots of some of the test. Photo 4 the top number was steadily going up from the 364.
Still looking for an O2 sensor.

249638


249639


249640


249641


249642


249643
 

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Based upon the 02 sensor codes; it looks like the wiring and the sensor should be tested and confirm the problem.

In this case the sensor is the 02 sensor upstream from the catalytic converter bank 1 sensor 1. I would follow the testing procedures; outlined in the service manual and this will confirm if the ecu, wiring or 02 sensor is the issue.


If you do end up needing a new 02 sensor; stick with oem Bosch sensors, stay away from cheap after market parts for crucial things like sensors.

Let us know, the results of the testing procedures outline in the service manual and we can go from there. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks Billymade, at this time I am trying to get the O2 sensor out of the exhaust to visually check it and do the test. Looks as I will need that special tool to get at it.
O2 volts when running show 0.45V @ 99%
Checking the coils but with the missing engine just better start with the O2 as the reading go all over the place.
Never knew that it would have a fuse so will try to find that if it has one, this is the BPR engine code.
Believe it or not I cannot even find a Bosch upstream sensor, they have tons of downstream one and this is the 6 wire (pin) type.
I have to add that we all need to be a little more on the lookout for counterfeit parts, a month ago I bought some NGK spark plugs on Amazon, they turned out to be fake but the box and the plugs looked to be the real deal other than I noticed the NKG logo was off set on one of the plugs. Long story short not all is what it may look like, even sensors.
Will post findings.
Thanks
 

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Yeah, best to purchase from reputable solid supplier or local brick and motor stores. Advance Auto, Pep Boys and sometimes Autozone have 15% to 30 % off online discount coupon codes and you can purchase online, pickup at the store.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Update -
Replaced the O2 sensor with a Bosch premium PN 17024 for the 2006 2.5L and is seems a it is a bit better but still getting a misfire P0300 (P0303) #3 cyl.
Cleared it twice and still has miss. Remove the spark plug for inspection and it looks good, reinstalled and checked the coil connector and it is fine, reinstalled coil and still has a misfire on #3.
Is there an ohm meter check test for the coil one can do or is it the switch it to a different cly and see if it fails on that cylinder?

Thanks
 

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These coil packs are known to fail, i think they have been revised; similar to the 1.8T coil pack debacle. Swapping to a different location/cylinder, seeing if the trouble code, travels, there; indicated by a trouble code for the new location, is a easy/quick, way to troubleshoot the problem.

In the past, there was a recall on the early revision failure prone coil packs:

 

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If you end up needing a new one, stick with oem or genuine vw parts; do not purchase them, from your typical local auto parts store, as they are known to fail and cause drivability problems. Some say to replace all your coils at once; as others may have degraded performance and other coils are likely to fail after just the one. Depending one age of the coil packs and milage on the engine; may help you decide what to do. Check the coils part #'s and they typically have a production date on them, which can help you, consider to just replace one or all of them. A fresh set of spark plugs and oem coil packs; can give you a nice tuneup and typically, makes your engine run much better, then before.

Let us know, the results of your troubleshooting process and we can go from there.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks Billymade. I heard that VW change the coils to one that have I believe has a rubber sleeves on the shaft as in the picture. If bad should I be looking for the new style if it applies to the 2006 Beetle.
Also I had a couple of the meatal sleeves come off when removing the coils is that a bad thing or common? Had to pull them out with needle nose plyers, maybe that's why the rubber sleeve.
Cheers

249648
249649
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Results-
Just replaced all the coils with the newer (new style) Bosch PN 0221604115 along with the new upstream O2 sensor (Bosch PN 17024) and glad to report that all codes are gone and the car runs much better than before, more power.
I world guess that the coils that I removed were failing fast as they turned out to have a production date of 2010 and were install a few years ago by the PO before we got it. Being old stock and made in China, not Bosch I guess one can expect problems later.
I am glad that Bosch change the shaft covering to a rubber type as the other meatal covers most all came off when removing. Also the Bosch one's went in without any trouble as I had to really push down on the old ones to seat them, they have a flexy rubber seal around the neck that can bunch up if off set.
Billymade, your right, don't mess with the no name stuff for important parts.
As for the O2, 14 years so not to bad now I expect the downstream to fail, hopefully not.
Cost total was $207 for all the parts, worth shopping around-$127 (5) = coils, $80 = O2 sensor.

Cheers
249653
249654
 

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Another case, of correct diagnosis and high quality oem parts, making all the difference! Good solid work! :) At almost 10 years old, i would think; they were due for replacement, as was the 02 sensor. What brand were the old coil packs and how were the spark plugs? I find it interesting, that Bosch revised the design of their coils; i always assumed, the metal shielding was added; to help cool the coil packs but who knows?
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
They were 10 years old but put into service a few years ago as the prior owner said that the coils were just replace before we bought the car, so they were on the shelf somewhere for a few years before being installed. I like what Bosch does and dates the coils along with codes on the box to verify that they are genuine .
The number found on the side of the coil related to a company in China, I don't remember the name let alone pronounce it. The spark plugs looked good in all respects, color, and wear, so will leave them for a bit. I too believe the same as the old sleeve cover did keep a gap between the inner shaft from the elements, but maybe the problem of installing and removing was a large complaint just as when I removed them the covers or outer shields would stay in the spark plug/coil hole. I don't think that the shield coming off was a big deal as it is built stout, but if the top edge of the shield gets bent as one on mine did it would make it hard for the upper edge of the shield to seat back in the top of the coil when reinstalling the outer shield.
The new rubber covering is pretty solid and looks as it can handle some high temps along with the two tabs on the top area that seal the top of the coil in the hole, they are a hard plastic that helps the coil slide in the two notches much easier than the old rubber, well as far as I am concerned.
The source of the coils- good folks
Cascade German, Inc.
Phone:
(503)669-2277
Email: [email protected]
Website: https://www.cascadegerman.com

Cheers
 

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It seems that counterfeit parts; are becoming a ongoing problem, I have run into them, being sold on amazon and ebay (nice genuine confirmation program by Bosch). I'm glad to hear, the car is fix and running as it should. Good work and thanks for documenting the details of the repair, plus your parts choices. Thanks.
 
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