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Discussion Starter #1
My 2002 turbo has a coolent leak. I put her up on the rack today and i saw coolent leaking from behind the lower main pully right above the oil pan. Could that be the water pump? I was gping to replace the timing belt soon. If it is the water pump weres the best play for a new one? Thanks
 

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This is the timing belt kit I've always used on 1.8t engines

Volkswagen New Beetle 1.8T Maintenance Engine Timing Belt Kit - 06B198479 V2waf - Timing Belt Kit - Ultimate Plus - ES#5954

ECS has great support and pretty well put together kits I also use them for BMW parts as well

And to check water pump flow look at your coolant overflow expansion tank. The small hose that is connected to it on the top, if you shine a hand light or flashlight through the back of the plastic expansion tank while the car is running, you can see coolant running out of that hose into the tank. If the flow is weak or not present at all then that is a good indication of a failing water pump. This test should also be performed at idle and during normal operating temps and not while the car is cold.

Hope this helps you out
 

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Thanks for the link. Ill get a kit ordered.
No problem buddy. The link also has installation instructions too with torque specs. I know the instructions are for a 1.8t Audi TT, but the install procedure is the same for the beetle minus the "beauty" panels and covers in the TT engine bay.

I'm actually going to be posting up a DIY instruction on how to change the timing belt, water pump, tensioner, camshaft and crankshaft seals, thermostat and housing, basically everything that comes in that kit here in about a week or two when I get some free time to change out my timing belt and comments.
 

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This is a pretty good how-to for the timing belt job: VWVortex.com - Ultimate Timing Belt DIY!
Yes this is a decent guide to the timing belt change, but I wanted to make a DIY specific to the new beetle for the members here. I was noticing the write up on VW vortex is missing some crucial torque values and small steps that are pretty important and often overlooked by DIYers. One thing Volkswagen excelled at was using multiple platforms with the same engine/powertrains, but what they also excelled at was having totally different removal and installation procedures for each vehicle and specific engine codes. I just think that a beetle based DIY is in order, due to the fact that the beetle is the most commonly overlooked VW in terms of how to's and maintenance. There was another thread on here where a member said his service writer at the dealer said he never sees beetles come in for service.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I think the pump finally went out. Coolent light started flashing and it pouring out under the crank pully. Im going to order the kit in the morning, and get a smaller tourqe wrench from snap on tonight. The job looks pretty streight foward. The biggest bummer about it is being without my new car for a few days.
 

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Yes this is a decent guide to the timing belt change, but I wanted to make a DIY specific to the new beetle for the members here. I was noticing the write up on VW vortex is missing some crucial torque values and small steps that are pretty important and often overlooked by DIYers. One thing Volkswagen excelled at was using multiple platforms with the same engine/powertrains, but what they also excelled at was having totally different removal and installation procedures for each vehicle and specific engine codes. I just think that a beetle based DIY is in order, due to the fact that the beetle is the most commonly overlooked VW in terms of how to's and maintenance. There was another thread on here where a member said his service writer at the dealer said he never sees beetles come in for service.
You could use this TB/WP DIY and create an updated version ...
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Is there any tricks to get new timeing belt to fit?? Ive tried everything. I tried putting the belt on the tension pully no luck. Any help would be great thanks...
 

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sure

Is there any tricks to get new timeing belt to fit?? Ive tried everything. I tried putting the belt on the tension pully no luck. Any help would be great thanks...
Why sure, easy stuff..LOL :D Did you remember to mark the old belt at the cam and crank before removing? and transfer the same marking on the new belt? put the belt at the top cam and run it through the rest of the pulleys/tensioners and leave the bottom crank last then do the old bicycle chain trick by turning the bottom crank as you push the belt on. I believe I only had to turn about 3/4 turns and it guided on. easy stuff

Holding the belt at the cam with one of this plastic holding tool helps. The second picture is somebody else's Idea on holding the belt at the crank with a washer. good luck man.
 

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That worked great thanks. SO I checked it a few times cranked the engine over by hand twice, all marks lined up. I put her back together and fired it up. It started right up. Is there susposed to be some light clicking from the valve cover? I don't remember how much there was before.. every few starts its takes a little longer cranking to fire up. Is this normal or do I have to tear it back apart and redo every thing??
 

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cllicking?

Good to hear you got the timing belt on. My first guess is that a slight clicking coming from the valve cover area usually means your valves timing change tensioner could be going bad especially at Idle. There is a DIY around here on replacing that just do a search. This guy in the yellow circle
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I took it half apart and rechecked the timing looked good. So put it back together. Fired it up let it idol for a few while I put the wheel back on, lifter clicking quieted down. It runs great and strong. Heater works great. It had a after market water pump that went out. I installed the whole kit from ECS except the seals for cam and crank shaft. The starting problem I put on the starter. The starter squeals right after its started some times it feels like it has a flat spot. So for know the bug is up and running strong. Thanks to everyone for there input and advice its GREATLY appreciated....
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Well 2 months later the water pump I got from ECS tuning, is leaking. I have to call on Monday and see if there is a warranty. I really not in the mood to redo the water pump now that my jeep wrangler is running again. I have already dumped a ton of money in to it. I might fix and sell it. I love driving it. But it breaks down every other week. I thought I had I running good till the water pump went out again. I'm thinking about towing it to the dealer for repairs. Any one else have any issues with the ESC water pumps?
 

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A number of people have had leaking problems (sealing or waterpump failure); a common issue, is the o-ring mating surfaces are not prepped correctly or the seal gets pinched, when installed. Check out this link for more info: (pay particular attention to the video)

Vw Water Pump Leak Leaking - Vw Water Pump Problems Explained
 

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pump leak

Sometimes it's a good Idea to even use a really fine sand paper(400 grid) and sand down the block hole where the water pump go's into for a better seal. The O-ring could have pinched and moved like billymade said. I always thought that it would be a good Idea to put a little of that FORM-A-GASKET Sealer behind the o-ring, not on the o-ring itself or in front of the 0-ring but behind as a backup in case it did leaked. I didn't do it to mine but will the next time around.
 
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