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A.K.A PROJECT X
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Hi all, I was reading up on replacing (coolant stuff, etc for my wife’s 2003 1.8l bugg and i know I’m going it have to replace the dreaded metal water hose (just checked it, rusty corroded on ends) on the right frame rails and other coolant stuff later possibly down the line. I’m going to have coolant loss of course but what’s the best way to rid of air pockets? I’ve heard of tools but wanted advise on it. That way if I have to tear into it however many times I’m ok with it and don’t Have to worry with air on burping the system ...thanks in advance ....Brandon
 

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The 1.8 T on the mark iv golf, new beetle and Jetta; historically has been a challenge to burp the system and remove the air out of the block in particular. Some design aspects Volkswagen implemented on these cars; seems to have aggravated this problem, the thermostat has no hole or wiggle valve, to equalize the coolant level in the block/water jacket and also there is no bleeder valve anywhere on the system, like on other models like the Passat. many have said another issue on many of all modern vehicles is the fact that the engine tends to be higher than the radiatir and so this is another factor in air pockets not naturally burping as easily as they used to on older cars.

Volkswagen is aware of this problem and this is confirmed by the fact that the factory vw service manual actually recommends the use of a vacuum based coolant filler tool. When I first started working on modern volkswagens ; I ran into this problem and so I invested in the UVIew brand Airlift vacuum tool and it has worked very well but does require the use of compressed air.


There are a number of YouTube videos that discuss burping vw engines and helpful tips on certain things to look for that can help make this easier if you do not have a vacuum filler tool.
 

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Pay attention to the "exovcds" youtube channel; his tips and info are very good and helped me understand how the cooling system works, plus things to check for
, seeing if the return line is clogged and even drilling a hole in the thermostat can help the burping process.
 

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Imbugd - 99 1.8t
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I really do love this site. Ive been a member here for years and still learn things regularly.

One thing I've learned today is that I've been lucky. Ive replaced the coolant on occasion in my beetles and never knowingly ran into this problem. ..and if it did occur it managed to work itself out over time. Almost certainly explains the need for later fills after I thought I had it all taken care of. :\

So yea, now another complication to think of when I get back to it.
 

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U don't need specialty tools to get the air out after replacing coolant if the system is functioning correctly. The air bubbles float to the highest point in the system Which is the reservoir and then burp out u will notice this as the reservoir level goes a little down a s the coolant is displaced by the air. After repairs u just need to keep adding g a little coolant to the reservoir level until all air burped out.
 
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