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Discussion Starter #1
We're heading into our first NY winter with Geraldine and wonder if we need to have a block warmer. We can't get her into the house so she's stuck in the garage . . .unheated (GASP!!). What experience do you all have with this issue? Thanks.:confused:
 

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I haven't had a problem with diesels in the winter.

Matter of fact back in January 1994 we had a record cold snap that sent the temps down to -21*F with some seriously strong winds.

I went out to start my Audi Quattro and got a whir click click click. So I went over to my Cabriolet and got....nothing. I looked over in the turn around and there was my almost 500,000 mile 1986 Jetta Diesel that had sat for about 2 months. I knew it wouldn't start but after about 5 seconds of cranking (which felt like an hour) she started right up. :)

Ironically I had picked up the Quattro for a winter car and on the day I needed it most.. she let me down. :lol:
 

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Huntington Station is probably about the same temp in the winter as Connecticut. I have never had a problem starting my TDI. The first two winters I had it, the car was outside all night and still never failed to start. Even an unheated garage is warmer than being outside. I think the biggest concern in the winter is to make sure you get good fuel. If you come across a station at this time of year that doesn't sell much diesel and still has the summer blend, that could be problematic, as the winter mix has the anti-gel agent in it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks to both of you. That's good to hear. We are waiting for the only known (by us) supplier on Long Island of bio to get his butt over and set us up with a holding tank which he is supposed to keep filled (sort of like an oil tank to heat a house). Then, we will be filling up from our own reserve and can run it 100, 95 or whatever we want. Looks like it will be better than diesel and cheaper, too.
 

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lugh said:
Thanks to both of you. That's good to hear. We are waiting for the only known (by us) supplier on Long Island of bio to get his butt over and set us up with a holding tank which he is supposed to keep filled (sort of like an oil tank to heat a house). Then, we will be filling up from our own reserve and can run it 100, 95 or whatever we want. Looks like it will be better than diesel and cheaper, too.

From what my understanding is .. you don't want to run biodiesel in the winter time because it doesn't have the anti gel properties necessary to keep it flowing in the cold temps.

You should go on www.tdiclub.com before filling up with it during the colder months...
 

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VW tests these things in Alaska (the interior), and there are LOTS of Canadian TDI owners who don't have issues with winter.

#1 - Good battery. Stock is probably good for 4, maybe 5 winters.

#2 - WINTER FUEL ! - or at least suitably treated fuel. Alot of folks use PowerService fuel treatment (white bottle) over the winter to lower the gel point. The Stanadyne you can get from VW is also reputed to be good, and there are probably some others that I don't see around here (we're lucky if we get a week of +teens or single digits here). The Powerservice should be available at your local Walmart. I wouldn't use Biodiesel below about 32 because of the gell factor. I use 8 oz of the PowerService every fillup (and I use the silver dieselKleen whne it's not winter).

#3 - proper oil - If you have a 2004 or later - you don't have a choice (gotta use the VW 505.01 spec). For older - a 0wX or 5wX diesel rated oil should get you fine.

That said - you shouldn't NEED any kind of heater. However, if you WANT one - look for the TDIHeater - it's one of the Zerostart coolant heaters with the appropriate hoses. People who have one rave about it - it's a good way to have instant heat (that will go away as soon as you start driving). There are some self-contained fuel-powered heaters that you can get (PRICEY !) - I'd consider these if the car was going to be parked outside at -40 and below regularly and you couldn't plug in.

Also - keep in mind that your TDI will probably not heat up too well just sitting and idling. People with Zerostarts report that the car actually cools off when they start idling. You want heat - drive it.

TDIClub is the place to go for good info. Just do some reading (a little knowledge goes a LONG way).
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Welcome Scooperhsd

Thanks for the extensive response. The information is very useful and I appeciate having it. Welcome to the group and why not take a few minutes to fill in some data about yourself and your ride so we can all get to know a little more about you? Looks like you will be an asset to the club. :)
 
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